Determiners are noun-modifiers that convey the reference of a noun without delineating its characteristics [as adjectives do].

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“All the good people” vs. “all of the good people”

I've heard both of these before. All the good people All of the good people Are they both correct?
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Determiner vs. Determinative

In the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, Huddleston and Pullum use the term "determinative" for the lexical category of words like the, etc. And they use "determiner" for the grammatical ...
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741 views

Possessive pronouns vs possessive determiners

If my understanding is correct, the possessive personal pronouns (which are mine, thine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, and theirs) are used in place of nouns, whereas the possessive determiners (which ...
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189 views

Is a determiner considered an adjective or a separate part?

I came across some blogs which states that determiners are types of adjectives (according to traditional grammar), whereas wiki (which I do not entirely trust) indicates some key differences. after ...
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118 views

What happens to articles in phrases “a bit <adjective> <noun>”?

Consider the phrase "I'm doing this for a bit different reason." The grouping here is "((a bit) different) reason" and not "a ((bit different) reason)", so the noun "reason" lacks an article. Does ...
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157 views

“Money is all what/that I need.” [duplicate]

1.) Money is all that I need. 2.) Money is all what I need. Which one is right? or which one have you not ever seen? and is there any difference between them? But, what about the following? If ...
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3answers
2k views

“Mostest” vs. “most” [closed]

What is the difference between mostest and most? Can they be used interchangeably?
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3answers
19k views

“At this time” vs “At that time”

Is it acceptable to use "at this time" when referring to a specific point in time in the past? While in the process of telling a story, for example, that happens completely in the past? To me it just ...
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2answers
168 views

Is it correct to say “which is Jay”?

I've been watching the movie "King Arthur", and I heard Arthur asking "Which is X?" Is it correct to say "Which is Jay?" instead of "Who is Jay?"?
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Missing articles?

Aren't some articles missing in the following sentence? ... when traditional pattern of landscape became established. Or is it something else that is wrong with this sentence? Context.
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Repeating determiners: “the X and (the) Y”

I have a problem with the use of "the" after "and" where you would basically be connecting words. For example, which of the following is better: The table and the chairs? The table and chairs? ...
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1answer
349 views

Predicate inner components in sentence (object without determiner)

I'm working on a computer program that might output the following sentence: Analyst Mark Mahaney upgraded rating on Apple to Buy Is that sentence valid in English? (That is, nothing betwen the ...
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1answer
237 views

Is “the many” grammatical? [closed]

The homework is as following As it stands, our rule allows just one determiner in an NP. NP → (D) (AdjP+) N (PP+) (CP) (PP+) How can we revise this rule to account for the following data: ...
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161 views

Parse tree of “several more successful books”

Let us consider the following sentence: After that first attempt, she wrote several more successful books. Does this mean she wrote several additional books that were also successful? Or that ...
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1answer
201 views

Is “each” an adverb, pronoun, determiner, or what else? [duplicate]

What do Online Dictionaries Say? Cambridge Dictionaries Online says each is used as an adverb in the following examples: There are five leaflets – please take one of each. Each of the brothers ...
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Dropping articles in confirmation messages

When writing a confirmation message, (i.e. from a computer system) is it correct to say: "Item was modified" or is it necessary to include the determinate article: "The item was modified".
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“Any vs. ”any other“ and ”every“ vs. ”every other"

Can you please clarify what difference in meanings exists between the sentences in the following two pairs: Tom is taller than any boy present in the class. Tom is taller than any other ...
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3answers
338 views

“My latest five novels” or “my five latest novels”?

Is it okay to say "my latest five novels" when I want to express "five of my latest novels"? As far as I know, "five" is a postdeterminer, so it precedes an adjective (except for ...
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1answer
393 views

“Do you like my present” vs. “do you like your present”

When my daughter received the present I bought to her, I asked her: Do you like my present? Is this correct? Or I should say: Do you like your present?
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1answer
249 views

Can I use “any” with singular noun in formal English?

As far I as I remember, "any" and "some" are used with plural nouns or uncountable ones. I know about exceptions for "some" (Wow, some car). But can I say the following and be grammatical: Is ...
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2answers
9k views

“They all are fine” vs. “they are all fine” [closed]

The situation is that someone asks me how my family are; I then want to answer that they all are fine. I want to know whether the sentences "They all are fine." and "They are all fine." have the ...
2
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1answer
59 views

There is not evidence vs. There is not any evidence vs. There is no evidence vs. There isn't evidence

A Washington Post article titled "Justice Dept. concludes that no, Michael Brown’s hands probably were not up" has this: According to the report, here is what investigators believe most likely ...
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3answers
325 views

Plural indefinite pronouns?

Can some indefinite pronouns be plural? One commenter on Mr K's Grammar World says they cannot. He also says the following examples contain quantifiers, and not indefinite pronouns. Many have ...
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396 views

“Much feces” vs. “many feces”

I want to know which word I should use in the following sentence: How many/much feces does a human produce in one year? I found that both versions exist on the Internet. Any help would be ...
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3answers
493 views

Why not concatenate two frequently used words into a new one?

I will probably get a lot of flak about this, but why not combine the often used together words "with the" into "withe" which is pronounced similarly, and it much shorter and easier to write? I am ...
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2answers
199 views

Using “that” to describe everything.. Is this incorrect, or poor grammar?

I'm not very English literate, but I am annoyed by the use of "that" during the CrossFit games. Announcers, coaches, and athletes all said "that" more times than I can count. Move that bar. Use ...
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239 views

I don't know which boy?

Is it correct to say: I don't know which boy you meet. For me which here makes sense but grammatically I think there is something wrong by using which to refer to the boy.
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240 views

Can the word 'formatting' be used as a noun?

Can the word formatting be used as a noun like in the following sentence: Consider the formatting of this JavaScript code... Or is it a gerund which should be used without an article: Consider ...
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The use of any with plural/singular words

I always thought with "any" I should use the plural, but on the internet I can find both: It can be found in any book. It can be found in any books Do you have any books? It can be said in any ...
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How to identify a determiner in a sentence that uses 2 determiners

In the sentence, "This is a flower." How can we both say that the "a" refers to a general noun (flower), yet also account for the presence of the specific determiner, "this?"
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“I am a legend” vs. “I am legend”

Which sentence makes sense, the first or the second? I am      legend. I am  a  legend.
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Is the use of “this” correct in “There is this blog, but I don't remember its name”?

What I write should mean the following: "There is this blog, but I don't remember its name." So I thought I have to write it this way to achieve the meaning in a short way: "This blog." But is ...
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1answer
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Is this construct correct? “This one something…”

After criticizing some whole category of blog posts as fake news, biased or undercover advertising, I was about to add: That being said, I must admit that this one article is quite interesting. ...
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Is “for all who” grammatical? [closed]

The context is: The blog for all who want to learn German. I feel like this is not correct, but the only alternative I can think of is: The blog for all those who want to learn German. ...
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71 views

The recognition of the word “Enough”

I came across a sentence and had bugged me ever since. I cannot identify whether the word "Enough" is an adjective, a pronoun, a determiner or an adverb although I highly suspect that is an adjective ...
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adjectives and past participles used as nouns [duplicate]

In general, 'the + adjective' and 'the + past participle' could be used instead of a plural noun phrase. The good die young. The damned will bury the dead. I think in certain cases that ...
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indefinite article plus proper name in organizational (i.e. business or bureaucracy) contexts

The use of the indefinite article with a proper name occurs often in business or organizational speech-contexts: We're lucky to have a Bill Jones to get the job done. The article plus proper ...
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Quantifiers “most” vs. “most of”

I came across this exercise in one of Oxford books. Most / Most of flowers bought at airports are safe, about 90%. Shouldn't we use "most of the" when we are talking about a specific set of ...
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Is there a difference between “way of doing something” and “way to do something”?

Is there a difference between "way of doing something" and "way to do something"? It is on purpose that I did not write "a way of doing something" or "the way of doing something" and "a way to do ...
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Grammar questions on the usage of “some” and “some of the” [closed]

I am correcting a short journal writes up from my student, who is from Korea and notice that I am so lacking of grammar knowledge in explaining to her why it is wrong in her sentence. Below is one ...
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Coordination of nouns with determiners

These sentences are from some data set used for evaluating programs that automatically process languages, but I am doubtful about their grammaticality. (1) A man and woman are talking (2) The boy and ...
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Is there a difference between articles and determiners?

I have heard the, a, and an referred to as both articles and determiners. Do these two terms mean the same thing, or are there some differences between them? Can a word be an article but not a ...
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306 views

Help sheet for determiners and prepositions [closed]

I'm trying to produce a simple help sheet for foriegn speakers on English determiners and prepositions. Specifically, a basic description of when to use each type of determiner, and then the list of ...
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62 views

Difference between “a few minutes” and “few minutes” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “A few” vs. “few” What is the difference between "a few minutes" and "few minutes"? For instance, how do these statements differ? She has ...
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4answers
134 views

Is “software” plural or singular? [closed]

I'd like to know why this sentence uses "needs" instead of "need": Even some very popular software sometimes needs a year or two of testing, I think the subject is plural because it says some is ...
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Correct usage of determiners and prepositions

I am confused between two sentences: The houses in the cities are more beautiful than that of villages. The houses in the cities are more beautiful than those in the villages. Which one ...
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1answer
157 views

“None of who’s” vs. “none of whose” [closed]

Is the following phrase grammatical? I seem to recall three people, none of who's names I can remember.
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1answer
160 views

“Any English I have learned” vs. “All the English I have learned” [closed]

Is it correct to say: Any English I have learned has been from movies and the Internet or is it better: All the English I have learned has been from movies and the internet?
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Central determiners “some” and “any” used with singular count nouns

I couldn't comment on Irene's post here, so I decided to make a topic. I'd like to know whether this phrase: "I can give you any book that's left" is grammatically right since "some" and "any" are ...
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Need explanation about demonstrative determiner

Does the demonstratives refer to the next word or previously mentioned statement? The medieval center is Prague Castle and St. Vitus Cathedral. An evening view of these illuminated landmarks is ...