Determiners are noun-modifiers that convey the reference of a noun without delineating its characteristics [as adjectives do].

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What happens to articles in phrases “a bit <adjective> <noun>”?

Consider the phrase "I'm doing this for a bit different reason." The grouping here is "((a bit) different) reason" and not "a ((bit different) reason)", so the noun "reason" lacks an article. Does ...
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143 views

Determiners and Plurality in literature [duplicate]

Many times we come across examples like these :- Hobbits are an unobtrusive but very ancient people... For they are a little people, smaller than Dwarves... ~ From The Fellowship of the ...
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60 views

Is the use of “this” correct in “There is this blog, but I don't remember its name”?

What I write should mean the following: "There is this blog, but I don't remember its name." So I thought I have to write it this way to achieve the meaning in a short way: "This blog." But is ...
0
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2answers
59 views

“what” as a determiner

I am composing a sentence describing results of an experiment: we find [results] beyond what can be expected from [theory] I am not sure this is a proper use of "what". Does my sentence needs ...
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2answers
410 views

How alive is the distinction between 'not any more' and 'not any longer'?

Does I don't love you any more. mean that my love dwindled till there was not any more of it left, focus(s)ing on the process, whereas I don't love you any longer. would mean that there ...
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4answers
3k views

Is there a difference between “way of doing something” and “way to do something”?

Is there a difference between "way of doing something" and "way to do something"? It is on purpose that I did not write "a way of doing something" or "the way of doing something" and "a way to do ...
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3answers
299 views

“So many weapons and armor!” What is wrong with this sentence? And how would one fix it?

The sentence rings false in my head. Clearly this is because "weapons" is a countable noun, and "armor" is an uncountable noun. So one could fix this sentence by breaking it up into two clauses (e.g. ...
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266 views

Can the word 'formatting' be used as a noun?

Can the word formatting be used as a noun like in the following sentence: Consider the formatting of this JavaScript code... Or is it a gerund which should be used without an article: Consider ...
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1answer
440 views

“Do you like my present” vs. “do you like your present”

When my daughter received the present I bought to her, I asked her: Do you like my present? Is this correct? Or I should say: Do you like your present?
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1answer
2k views

“Any vs. ”any other“ and ”every“ vs. ”every other"

Can you please clarify what difference in meanings exists between the sentences in the following two pairs: Tom is taller than any boy present in the class. Tom is taller than any other ...
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2answers
1k views

Usage of “same” vs. “selfsame”

I have been wondering in my head when is it more appropriate grammatically and more appropriate in terms of the English language to use word selfsame instead of same. The research that I have done ...
3
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1answer
856 views

Possessive pronouns vs possessive determiners

If my understanding is correct, the possessive personal pronouns (which are mine, thine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, and theirs) are used in place of nouns, whereas the possessive determiners (which ...
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86 views

known as (a, the) - which article to pick?

A quote from the Economist: Part of this naturalistic approach is that the transistors in his systems often operate in what is known technically as the “sub-threshold domain”. May we use a ...
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2answers
205 views

Using “that” to describe everything.. Is this incorrect, or poor grammar?

I'm not very English literate, but I am annoyed by the use of "that" during the CrossFit games. Announcers, coaches, and athletes all said "that" more times than I can count. Move that bar. Use ...
2
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1answer
256 views

Can I use “any” with singular noun in formal English?

As far I as I remember, "any" and "some" are used with plural nouns or uncountable ones. I know about exceptions for "some" (Wow, some car). But can I say the following and be grammatical: Is ...
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3answers
342 views

“My latest five novels” or “my five latest novels”?

Is it okay to say "my latest five novels" when I want to express "five of my latest novels"? As far as I know, "five" is a postdeterminer, so it precedes an adjective (except for ...
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2answers
1k views

Which is correct, “in the past one hundred years” or “in the past hundred years”? [closed]

We say "in a few years" but "in the past/last few years". Then how can we express " the period of 100 years leading up to now"? Which is correct, "the last/past one hundred years" or "the last/past ...
2
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1answer
365 views

Predicate inner components in sentence (object without determiner)

I'm working on a computer program that might output the following sentence: Analyst Mark Mahaney upgraded rating on Apple to Buy Is that sentence valid in English? (That is, nothing betwen the ...
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The use of any with plural/singular words

I always thought with "any" I should use the plural, but on the internet I can find both: It can be found in any book. It can be found in any books Do you have any books? It can be said in any ...
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1answer
2k views

“That” vs “It” as Anaphoric Determiners

What are the specific uses and differences of "it" and "that" in anaphoric reference? Sometimes they can be used interchangeably and sometimes they can't. I am teaching back referencing as a ...
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1answer
271 views

Is the quantifier a modifier or is it modified, in semantic respect?

"You've met Malfoy before?" Harry explained about their meeting in Diagon Alley. "I've heard of his family," said Ron darkly. "They were some of the first to come back to our side ...
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316 views

Help sheet for determiners and prepositions [closed]

I'm trying to produce a simple help sheet for foriegn speakers on English determiners and prepositions. Specifically, a basic description of when to use each type of determiner, and then the list of ...
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1answer
183 views

US English - need for determiners (a/an) in each item of a list (already parallel)

I have been all over every grammar site I can find (including this one) and cannot find a definitive answer. I am looking for a rule that says in a list of singular nouns, each noun must have its own ...
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1answer
343 views

Can we call 'ever' as a specifier?

He does not like planes. She never eats meal. (English Syntax and Argumentation, Bas Aarts) Aarts calls the negatives, not and never, as specifiers. ‘Ever’ in the example below seems to take ...
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Use of “yet another” in the middle of a sentence

Is the usage of yet another correct in the following sentence? This sentence might need yet another piece of work for you! Where can I place yet another in a sentence?
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252 views

I don't know which boy?

Is it correct to say: I don't know which boy you meet. For me which here makes sense but grammatically I think there is something wrong by using which to refer to the boy.
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4answers
902 views

“Most” vs. “most of”

During most of history, humans were too busy to think about thought. Why is "most of history" correct in the above sentence? I could understand the difference between "Most of the people" and ...
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3answers
114 views

“The applicability of the algorithm to uniform filter bank” or “to the uniform filter bank”?

I have this sentence: We would like to prove the applicability of the algorithm to uniform filter bank. I am not sure about the before uniform filter bank. To give the context for the sentence, ...
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7answers
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Is “May I have some drink?” incorrect?

This weekend, I took my family to Arby's to eat. My wife ordered us all some food, and filled the cups with some ice and some soda, then I got some sauce for my sandwich as well as some sauces for ...
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157 views

How to analyze lightly varying senses of adjective *very*

Use of very as an adjective is (in my experience) most frequently attested in phrases like ...the very person I was looking for. To use adjective very with the indefinite article sounds quite ...
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2answers
226 views

Can you use “many, many” in this way?

Suppose I want to use the phrase "many, many" to compound the "maniness" of the thing I'm describing. There are many, many people. The people (of which there are many, many) The first one ...
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3k views

Need explanation about demonstrative determiner

Does the demonstratives refer to the next word or previously mentioned statement? The medieval center is Prague Castle and St. Vitus Cathedral. An evening view of these illuminated landmarks is ...
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1answer
2k views

Some other or another

I wonder if "some other" means exactly the same as "another" in the following sentences. Is there any difference between them? There must be another explanation. There must be some other ...
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1answer
98 views

Is this construct correct? “This one something…”

After criticizing some whole category of blog posts as fake news, biased or undercover advertising, I was about to add: That being said, I must admit that this one article is quite interesting. ...
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3answers
834 views

“A different one” when we have 3 objects - other/another? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Can “another” be used with plural nouns provided periods or measurements don’t count? Here is the context (found in a forum for learners of English) WAITRESS: Do you ...
0
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1answer
4k views

“These stuff” vs. “this stuff” [closed]

I wrote “I know all these stuff; I don’t have to go over them again” in my writing-exam paper and the teacher corrected it to read, “I know all this stuff; I don’t have to go over it again.” The ...
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Can “another” be used with plural nouns provided periods or measurements don’t count?

Merriam-Webster says about another the following: being one more in addition to one or more of the same kind —http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/another However, I come across such ...
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2k views

Is the use of “what” over “which” correct in this sentence?

I was filling out an application form, when I had noticed this sentence: If bilingual, please provide in what languages. If I was writing this, I'd form it as which languages, instead of what ...
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1answer
255 views

Is “the many” grammatical? [closed]

The homework is as following As it stands, our rule allows just one determiner in an NP. NP → (D) (AdjP+) N (PP+) (CP) (PP+) How can we revise this rule to account for the following data: ...
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2answers
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“They all are fine” vs. “they are all fine” [closed]

The situation is that someone asks me how my family are; I then want to answer that they all are fine. I want to know whether the sentences "They all are fine." and "They are all fine." have the ...
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3answers
3k views

Correct usage of determiners and prepositions

I am confused between two sentences: The houses in the cities are more beautiful than that of villages. The houses in the cities are more beautiful than those in the villages. Which one ...
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3answers
598 views

When is it appropriate to use 'the' instead of a possessive determiner?

I was with someone today and we were talking about a woman, and she said: "Wow, the husband must be so proud." I was confused as to which was correct or more appropriate as opposed to: "Wow, ...
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2answers
503 views

Can I precede a noun with more than one determiner?

Is there a rule that a noun would take only one determiner at most? For example, according to “Determiner” at EnglishLanguageGuide.com, both both and the are determiners. Can I write an expression ...
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3answers
705 views

“You didn't build that” — but what was Obama referring to by “that”?

During the opening night of the Republican National Convention, many speakers took to the podium and took advantage of a phrase spoken by President Obama that some are calling a grammatical error. In ...
0
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1answer
168 views

“Any English I have learned” vs. “All the English I have learned” [closed]

Is it correct to say: Any English I have learned has been from movies and the Internet or is it better: All the English I have learned has been from movies and the internet?
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“Its” as a Possessive Pronoun

Since its can be both determiner possessive pronoun and nominal possessive pronoun, an example of its as determiner possessive pronoun would be: We saved this question for last because of its ...
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“… things like this.” vs. “… things like that.”

Yesterday on talk radio an interviewee speaking about Sudanese Northerner's being forced into the mountains and away from their farmlands by the Sudanese Army said the result was: The men would ...
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“Mostest” vs. “most” [closed]

What is the difference between mostest and most? Can they be used interchangeably?
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1k views

Is there a clear delineation between the usages of 'this' and 'that' in American English?

One of my linguistics professors speaks English as a second language, and remarked that she never knows which of the two is appropriate. Given a list of examples, all native speakers in the classroom ...
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Central determiners “some” and “any” used with singular count nouns

I couldn't comment on Irene's post here, so I decided to make a topic. I'd like to know whether this phrase: "I can give you any book that's left" is grammatically right since "some" and "any" are ...