40
votes
17answers
4k views

“If I were you, I'd apologise to my/your mum”

I'm stuck with this example which I don't know how to solve A: I've said bad things to my mum. B: If I were you, I'd apologise to your mum. Is it supposed to be your or my instead? My feeling ...
0
votes
2answers
50 views

How alive is the distinction between 'not any more' and 'not any longer'?

Does I don't love you any more. mean that my love dwindled till there was not any more of it left, focus(s)ing on the process, whereas I don't love you any longer. would mean that there ...
-3
votes
3answers
193 views

Doesn't “Thanks very much.” sound weird? [closed]

Cambridge's English Vocabulary in Use, Pre-Intermediate and Intermediate, gives, as a common way of thanking people, “Thanks (very much).” (third edition, unit 64, page 134, heading C: Thanks and ...
3
votes
2answers
123 views

Usage of “same” vs. “selfsame”

I have been wondering in my head when is it more appropriate grammatically and more appropriate in terms of the English language to use word selfsame instead of same. The research that I have done ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

“Which/what is your bike?” [duplicate]

— Which/what is your bike? — The blue bike. Is it possible to choose what instead of which, in your opinion?
2
votes
1answer
132 views

Can I use “any” with singular noun in formal English?

As far I as I remember, "any" and "some" are used with plural nouns or uncountable ones. I know about exceptions for "some" (Wow, some car). But can I say the following and be grammatical: Is ...
-1
votes
1answer
525 views

Some other or another

I wonder if "some other" means exactly the same as "another" in the following sentences. Is there any difference between them? There must be another explanation. There must be some other ...
4
votes
3answers
466 views

“A different one” when we have 3 objects - other/another? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Can “another” be used with plural nouns provided periods or measurements don’t count? Here is the context (found in a forum for learners of English) WAITRESS: Do you ...
0
votes
1answer
964 views

Is the use of “what” over “which” correct in this sentence?

I was filling out an application form, when I had noticed this sentence: If bilingual, please provide in what languages. If I was writing this, I'd form it as which languages, instead of what ...
0
votes
1answer
130 views

“Any English I have learned” vs. “All the English I have learned” [closed]

Is it correct to say: Any English I have learned has been from movies and the Internet or is it better: All the English I have learned has been from movies and the internet?
3
votes
2answers
2k views

“… things like this.” vs. “… things like that.”

Yesterday on talk radio an interviewee speaking about Sudanese Northerner's being forced into the mountains and away from their farmlands by the Sudanese Army said the result was: The men would ...
2
votes
3answers
726 views

“Mostest” vs. “most” [closed]

What is the difference between mostest and most? Can they be used interchangeably?
1
vote
0answers
58 views

Difference between “a few minutes” and “few minutes” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “A few” vs. “few” What is the difference between "a few minutes" and "few minutes"? For instance, how do these statements differ? She has ...
1
vote
2answers
146 views

Is “for all who” grammatical? [closed]

The context is: The blog for all who want to learn German. I feel like this is not correct, but the only alternative I can think of is: The blog for all those who want to learn German. ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

“Any” with countable nouns in questions

I have seen "is “any” also used with plurals", which explains that any can be used with singular, plural, and uncountable nouns. However, I want to ask specifically about questions. ...
3
votes
3answers
198 views

“Which” or “where”?

A question of mine on another SE site was corrected from: I am trying to determine where on Earth has the lowest gravity. To: I am trying to determine which on Earth's surface has the lowest ...
5
votes
4answers
7k views

“An other” vs “another”

I just edited this answer on unix.sx. The original sentence was But it won't transform it to an other format. I changed this to But it won't transform it to another format. The second form ...
0
votes
1answer
320 views

“User's expertise” or “user expertise”?

What is the correct form when referring to the expertise of a user (e.g. in programming, writing)? user's expertise user expertise
3
votes
1answer
776 views

“At the time” versus “at that time”

If I want to say that during the accident there were no passengers, how do I phrase it? There were no passengers at the time. There were no passengers at that time.
0
votes
1answer
12k views

What are the grammatical rules for use of “these”, “those”, and “them”?

I am unclear of the use of [these|those] objects. I am unsure when to use [these|those|them]. Please someone help me tell me which is correct in the previous sentences. This is not a dupe of ...
5
votes
3answers
6k views

What's the difference between “another” and “other”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “My another account” vs. “my other account” Sometime it's vague for me when to use other vs another. For example, You need to buy other ...
1
vote
3answers
296 views

“Much feces” vs. “many feces”

I want to know which word I should use in the following sentence: How many/much feces does a human produce in one year? I found that both versions exist on the Internet. Any help would be ...
4
votes
4answers
22k views

“Many people” vs. “much people” — which one should be used?

There's so many people in here! There's so much people here! Which one should be used, and why?
8
votes
1answer
4k views

“Alternative to” vs “Alternative for”

I'm wondering whether there is a difference between these two expressions. I never know which one to use. Google seems to return the same amount of results for both, so I suppose there might be a ...
8
votes
7answers
13k views

Do “in future” and “in the future” imply different meanings?

Do in future and in the future imply different meanings? If so, using which one is grammatically correct?
20
votes
9answers
15k views

“A few” vs. “few”

I have few friends. I have a few friends. I thought "few" means just one, two or even none. "A few" typically means more than two. However it seems to me some people say "few" when they ...