Determiners are noun-modifiers that convey the reference of a noun without delineating its characteristics [as adjectives do].

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I'm having a question OR I'm having one question - Which sounds better? [on hold]

Can anyone please tell me, what would be a nicer way to ask a single question to a project manager or a team leader? I'm having a question OR I'm having one question. Which one is preferable?
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58 views

behind a / the desk? [closed]

In the phrase 'in the field instead of behind a / the desk', would you use 'a' or 'the'? It seems to me that 'the' is the more sensible option, as English has other expressions of the 'the N' form ...
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24 views

“All” or “all of” before proper noun (place) [duplicate]

Question: "All or "All of" before a proper noun (place)? Example sentence: All of North Carolina gets hot in the summer time. (Or, all?) And what about when referring to all people in a certain ...
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61 views

Which is the right usage: It vs That [closed]

"OH! You are an Encyclopedia. I forgot it/that." (Said In the context after sharing something to a person who already knows it). It or that? Which is right or better usage?
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42 views

Resolution for the double “the” problem

Consider the following sentence: "With the Nike shirt, your workout will be complete". How will I say the same thing about a shirt of the brand "The North Face"? The least awkward option will ...
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155 views

“An High Priest of Good Things to Come” — why “An”?

I am watching a video of one of the Apostles of the Mormon Church, Elder Holland, which is entitled: "An High Priest of Good Things to Come" The video contains this line: "Speaking of Jesus’ ...
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26 views

Improper use of words with Subjective Pronouns

I read a quote as below: "You is kind. You is smart. You is important." (Kathryn Stockett) Clearly using "is" is not grammatically correct for "You" I have heard another sentence in which it seems ...
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173 views

Is “many a person” singular or plural? [duplicate]

I'm writing a paper and I am not sure how to word this sentence. Which is the correct sentence: I am able to avoid a pitfall into which many a student has fallen. I am able to avoid a pitfall ...
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a [box [of apples] ] vs [a box] [of apples]

The standard linguistic analysis of the NP a box of apples is that we have a determiner (a) which acts on (modifies?) box of apples. (For an example of standard analysis, see e.g. Fig. 6 here). ...
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38 views

What are the determiners 'this/these/that/those' called when they are not demonstrative?

Consider the sentences That car, which has been on the supermarket parking lot for a week now, do you have any idea who it belongs to? where the car can actually be seen at a distance, and ...
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20 views

“The” as in “The withdrawal of the production of the product”

When using the determiner "the", I sometimes notice that when writing a phrase like "The withdrawal of the production of the product," it is more natural (in my opinion) to write "The withdrawal of ...
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You're both of us' child / You're both of our child / You're both of ours child - Why are these all ungrammatical?

There was an interesting question on our sister site ELL: Is “Both of our child” valid? Suppose a kid asks their mother "Am I your child or Dad's child?": Why are the alternatives in the title ...
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'A / One / At least one student entered the room.' Are these the same? (truth-conditionally)

I just wonder if the two following sentences are truth-conditionally the same. Sentence 1 essentially means there existed a student who entered the room, and this situation includes two, three or more ...
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37 views

“Both” when an action requires two parties

I sometimes come across sentences like this one: Both sides in the refugee dispute have been making seemingly contradictory claims about the age and gender of the Syrian refugees — portraying them ...
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160 views

Can the word “group” function as a determiner?

Here are some example sentences that show my thought process: Some cats are playing with each other. Okay, it seems obvious that "some" is a determiner. A number of cats are playing with ...
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433 views

“each of us” vs “both of us”

A guy said that he will give them 20 bucks if they wash his car. So they asked him that question to make it clear. But I am confused by their reply: Is that 20 bucks for each of us or both of us? ...
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1answer
170 views

“whatever” as pure determiner?

My dictionaries and references define, and I've always thought of, one of the functions of the word whatever as a "relative determiner." In a sentence like, "I will help you in whatever way is ...
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4answers
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Omitting the determiner: “a peach cake or (a) cheesecake”

Can I omit the second determiner "a" in this sentence? Which would you like, a peach cake or a cheesecake? Is the determiner of cheesecake necessary to make the intended meaning of either a ...
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66 views

What are the differences between “so” and “so much”?

When I received your email, I was so much glad. Do you think that, in above sentence, the use of "so much" is correct? What should I use? If I use, "so" instead of "so much", does the meaning of ...
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182 views

When may adjectives precede determiners? (E.g. too difficult a task)

The expression too difficult a task sounds a little pompous, but it doesn't sound ungrammatical. According to my folk-beliefs about English grammar, determiners precede adjectives. However, the ...
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3answers
155 views

“He was neither seer nor prophet” How would you explain the absence of an article?

Here's a fragment from Jack London's Star Rover: Wordsworth knew. He was neither seer nor prophet, but just ordinary man like you or any man. What he knew you know, any man knows. But he most ...
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What/Which train are you going on/by? [duplicate]

What is the difference between the following interrogative structures? What train are you going on/by? Which train are you going on/by? And which of the prepositions, given at the end ...
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3answers
389 views

“you,” “your” or “yours” in this sentence? [duplicate]

I just received an email that had the following sentence, We have plenty of magic that will pique your and your customers' interest. Aside from the obvious errors, do we use "you" "yours" or "...
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62 views

What is the determiner in “the little girl's pink dress”?

The little girl's pink dress. Is the determiner "the", or is it "the little girl's"?
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“Person with a trauma” or “person with trauma”

In academic writing, I frequently run across texts where the determiner is dropped when a person is described as having a medical condition or having suffered an injury. Moreover, a singular noun is ...
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Determiners in English sentence vs. plurals, singulars and zero determiners. Is it ok to say? [duplicate]

Do I need any determiners in the sentence below in general statement? Strong winds destroy homes. Is it ok to say in English in specific situation? The strong wind destroyed the homes in North ...
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Can predicative complements not be bare noun phrases in English? That is, are clauses such as “I am student” incorrect?

In Chapter 4 of the book A Student’s Introduction to English Grammar, written by Rodney Huddleston of the University of Queensland and Geoffrey K. Pullum of the University of Edinburgh and published ...
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51 views

Little boy or That little boy

I recently saw this sentence: Best wishes for little kid which I think she should put a determiner or an article before little kid, E.g: Best wishes for my little kid or Best wishes for that little ...
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her: a determiner or a pronoun?

Her has two forms: Possessive form of 'she': This is her pen; She is her mother Object form of 'she': Give it to her; I know her For simplicity, please let me refer to the first form of her as ...
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515 views

My father had no much money / My father did not have much money [closed]

Can both sentences be acceptable? (1) My father did not have much money. (2) My father had no much money. If one of them is incorrect, what is the grammatical reason why?
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288 views

'The average person' or 'an average person'?

Which one is correct, or are both of them fine? "It would take the average person 10 days to read this novel" Or "It would take an average person 10 days to read this novel"
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Question on use of either/either the and both/both the

As a second-language learner of English, I have been encountering many English expressions that I cannot grasp intuitively, but could find the most sound answers to some of my questions. However, I ...
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Pronunciation of a (article) /ə/ vs /eɪ/ [duplicate]

When to use the weak form /ə/ and when to use the weak form /eɪ/ of the article "a"? I figure if I would emphasize anything I wouldn't emphasize an article like "a", but rather, the noun (phrase) ...
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891 views

In town but not in the town

We say "the best restaurant in town" but not "what is the best restaurant in the town". Why is this?
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58 views

“A”/“an” in front of a noun

Which sentence is grammatically correct or preferred? Emerald is a delicate and brittle gemstone. An emerald is a delicate and brittle gemstone. My kids and even one of their teachers ...
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7answers
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Why “be king”, not “be a king”? [duplicate]

I've heard people say "be king" (as in "I can't wait to be king") in movies and TV. Why don't they say "be a king"? Which is correct?
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4answers
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There is not evidence vs. There is not any evidence vs. There is no evidence vs. There isn't evidence

A Washington Post article titled "Justice Dept. concludes that no, Michael Brown’s hands probably were not up" has this: According to the report, here is what investigators believe most likely ...
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2k views

When to use “this” or “that”?

It is 10 cm on the map. That is 100 km in real terms. I am proofreading and it seems odd that the writer always uses that in these cases. I would have said this. Who is right and who is wrong?
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Is “each” an adverb, pronoun, determiner, or what else? [duplicate]

What do Online Dictionaries Say? Cambridge Dictionaries Online says each is used as an adverb in the following examples: There are five leaflets – please take one of each. Each of the brothers ...
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“To this end” or “To that end”

Is there a usage note for choosing between these two phrases? Nothing in Garner. And I've seen it both ways. Example: To that end, we propose the following compromise. or To this end, we ...
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A battery of tests is/are

This is from a recent article: He was rushed to the hospital immediately and a battery of tests was conducted. Now shouldn't it be He was rushed to the hospital immediately and a battery ...
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1answer
316 views

“None of who’s” vs. “none of whose” [closed]

Is the following phrase grammatical? I seem to recall three people, none of who's names I can remember.
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340 views

adjectives and past participles used as nouns [duplicate]

In general, 'the + adjective' and 'the + past participle' could be used instead of a plural noun phrase. The good die young. The damned will bury the dead. I think in certain cases that ...
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211 views

Repeating determiners: “the X and (the) Y”

I have a problem with the use of "the" after "and" where you would basically be connecting words. For example, which of the following is better: The table and the chairs? The table and chairs? ...
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Coordination of nouns with determiners

These sentences are from some data set used for evaluating programs that automatically process languages, but I am doubtful about their grammaticality. (1) A man and woman are talking (2) The boy and ...
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103 views

Non-use of Determiners

I have reviewed several related posts here but am still quite confused with the use of determiners. Say, in this sentence - "They reviewed the forms again to ensure completeness and accuracy." What ...
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345 views

Is “software” plural or singular? [closed]

I'd like to know why this sentence uses "needs" instead of "need": Even some very popular software sometimes needs a year or two of testing, I think the subject is plural because it says some is ...
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indefinite article plus proper name in organizational (i.e. business or bureaucracy) contexts

The use of the indefinite article with a proper name occurs often in business or organizational speech-contexts: We're lucky to have a Bill Jones to get the job done. The article plus proper ...
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Dropping articles in confirmation messages

When writing a confirmation message, (i.e. from a computer system) is it correct to say: "Item was modified" or is it necessary to include the determinate article: "The item was modified".
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Is there a difference between articles and determiners?

I have heard the, a, and an referred to as both articles and determiners. Do these two terms mean the same thing, or are there some differences between them? Can a word be an article but not a ...