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0
votes
1answer
67 views

Can one form an adverb from any adjective?

I'm trying to form the following sentence: ...we can talk more substantiatively in the event that X occurs. The term "substantiatively" isn't in either the computer dictionary or online at ...
1
vote
7answers
4k views

What word to choose as the opposite of “self-aware”?

What word would describe the quality of not being self-aware? unselfaware unself-aware un-selfaware un-self-aware non-self-aware I am aware that it is allowed to have multiple hyphens in a word. ...
2
votes
1answer
40 views

Correct morphological parse of a word “indecipherable”

What will be the correct morphological parse of word indecipherable in-prefix>decipher-stem>able-suffix or indecipherable in-prefix>de- prefix >cipher-stem>able-suffix ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

What is the proper suffix to change bildungsroman into an adjective? [closed]

In this case I am wondering what suffix would be the best use for bildungsroman when trying to characterize a memoir.
1
vote
2answers
106 views

Nouns to adjectives: “-ous” vs. “-ful”

When turning nouns to adjectives, what is the rule for using the suffixes -ous or -ful? Why do pain/harm became painful/harmful and not painous or harmous? Why do glory/nerve become glorious/nervous ...
10
votes
5answers
3k views

What's the difference between “efficacy” and “effectiveness”?

I usually use the word "effectiveness" in conversation, but sometimes I use the word "efficacy" then self-correct with "effectiveness" . Is there a practical difference between them?
0
votes
0answers
98 views

What are the morphemes in the word “imaginative”?

What are the morphemes in the word "imaginative" and what are their functions? I'm studying morphology, and I know the general types of morphemes in words. Every morpheme has a meaning that changes ...
0
votes
2answers
98 views

Do false diminutives exist in English?

In some languages, there are false diminutives, by which I mean words which have diminutive suffixes but don't express either small size or affectionately emotive meanings. For example, in Italian, ...
1
vote
2answers
44 views

Is “transitionable” a valid word?

I want to say that a task should be made to be transitionable, meaning it should be easy to transition the task to another person without requiring an extensive amount of training. My spell checker ...
1
vote
2answers
131 views

The pronunciation of “peripheral”

Some time ago, I heard the pronunciation of the word peripheral on a TV show (Brain Games, to be exact). Very surprised to hear /pəɹɪfəɹəl/, I asked two close relatives whether that was how the word ...
3
votes
3answers
130 views

Spermatozoan or spermatozoal?

Spermatozoon is a single mature sperm cell. The plural is spermatozoa. Which of the following is correct: "Spermatozoal motility" or "spermatozoan motility"? Or should it be something else? Googling ...
2
votes
3answers
123 views

Demonyms - When a place ends on an “s” sound, why are its inhabitants sometimes spelled with a “t”? (e.g. Mars - Martian)

I am not natively English speaking and I was wondering about this spelling when I saw the title of the movie "The Martian". This pattern also seems to apply to other things ending on an "s" sound, ...
2
votes
5answers
2k views

Does the word 'incrementation' exist?

An example: "To increment a variable makes an incrementation". One language wiki says it does, while MS Word and several dictionaries say there is no such word.
-2
votes
2answers
99 views

“Hair” to is “hairy” as “key” is to what word? [closed]

There is a noun hair, so person who has a lot of hair is hairy. So how about key; is there any word that means that person has keys. In programming terms, a container has keys for every value, like in ...
0
votes
1answer
111 views

How do you know if a derivative word is actually an English word? [duplicate]

For example, "recidivistic" can be found in Merriam-Webster as an adjective derivative of recidivist. How do I know if "recidivistically" is adverb form of "recidivistic"? It is not listed in ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Differing pronunciations of “divisive”

I've always pronounced it dɪˈvaɪsɪv (rhymes with incisive). Today at his press conference, President Obama pronounced it dɪˈvɪsɪv (rhymes with dismissive). I've heard the latter pronunciation off ...
0
votes
3answers
195 views

Do the words 'poster' and 'mixer' have one or two morphemes?

The words 'Driver', 'writer' and 'player' are composed of base and -er morpheme, which have the meaning of the one who writes or drives..., whereas 'mixer' doesn't mean the one who mixes, does it mean ...
4
votes
1answer
155 views

What is the Pluto equivalent of geocentric? [closed]

A satellite going around the earth is in geocentric orbit. The Earth is in a heliocentric orbit about the sun. Something going around Mars is areocentric. What about the moons of Pluto? ...
4
votes
1answer
162 views

What is the need of an invisible affix?

When nothing means something: In morpheme-based morphology, a null morpheme is a morpheme that is realized by a phonologically null affix (an empty string of phonological segments). In simpler ...
39
votes
3answers
48k views

What’s the rule for adding “-er” vs. “-or” when nouning a verb?

What’s the rule to decide whether you add -er or whether you add -or when creating a noun from a verb? Sometimes it’s -er: read > reader hate > hater hit > hitter But other times it’s -or: ...
11
votes
5answers
2k views

What is the adjectival form of “nemesis”?

If I have a non-person object or idea that I consider to be my nemesis1, how could I refer to the object as a noun but use an embellishing adjective to emphasize that the object is my nemesis? For ...
3
votes
3answers
4k views

Is “irritance” not a word?

I thought the word irritance was a word — but it isn’t one according to Google and my dictionary. It sounds correct; what is the word I should use? By irritance I mean something that’s being ...
9
votes
4answers
1k views

Is versionize a real word?

Is the word "versionize" a real word or is it a form of bastardization of English? Additional Info: I came across this word in a software feature tracker. The feature called for something in the ...
1
vote
3answers
178 views

Noun for the quality of being a “femme fatale”

In referring to a particular femme fatale, I described her "femme fataleness." That is "ungrammatical" (I believe) but got the point across. Is there a correct term for this particular attribute? If ...
1
vote
2answers
56 views

The source of -i- in “aquifer”?

What is the source of the -i- in the word aquifer? I would have thought we would have *aquafer aqua being Latin for water.
-1
votes
1answer
75 views

Is 'unassumingly' a real word? [closed]

So I'm trying to say 'in a way that doesn't draw attention from others'. Is 'unassumingly' right word for that or what kind of adverb should I use? Thanks in advance.
1
vote
4answers
481 views

What is the nominal form of the verb “to give”?

Normally one can add -tion or -ation to a verb to make it nominal, but that nominalization doesn't work for "give". Is there a nominalized form of "to give"? If not, is there a word that could serve ...
4
votes
1answer
104 views

Can the word mnemonic be used adverbally?

A mnemonic is a memory device for reducing something diverse and complicated to an easily -remembered pattern. For example, for the order of planets in the solar system, I learned as a boy the ...
12
votes
5answers
2k views

How should “often” be pronounced?

I heard people saying "Of-fen" as well as "Of-ton". Till now I have been using the first one but few days ago I had an interviewer who pronounced often "Of-Ton" while interviewing.
-1
votes
1answer
80 views

The word foresaw and its morphemes

I need help with the word foresaw. I know that the morphemes for foresaw are {fore} and {saw} but what kind of morpehmes are they (derivational/inflection) and what are their category and function
0
votes
3answers
257 views

Is there an -ically suffixed word to describe a duration?

We know about chronologically to describe order by time, but is there a word to describe duration? I want to say something like "school is x-ically taxing", as in, school is heavily taxing on an ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Adding a suffix and a prefix to the word “ocean” [closed]

Is it possible to add a prefix to the word ocean? Also, is it possible to add a suffix to it as well?
-1
votes
3answers
3k views

What is the meaning of unhighlight [closed]

What does the word "unhighlight" mean? Alternately, is it even a word? What would be its usage? I can't find it in my dictionary or on the internet. I am using it in the context of if you highlight ...
2
votes
3answers
449 views

When does one append “-ly”?

I am trying to understand the difference between adjectives that end in ‑ly compared with adjectives that do not end end in ‑ly. For example (the ones I would have chosen are bold): A tactical ...
0
votes
2answers
20k views

How do you convert a noun into an adjective? [closed]

What would be the adjectives for nouns like shopkeeper, country, wife, earring, teacher, father — and so on and so forth?
-1
votes
1answer
173 views

Is “Universityhood” a valid English word? [closed]

This is a theme during the foundation day of a college, "Nurturing Elders' Legacy and Aspiring for Excellent Quest as a Keystone into University". Isn't it universityhood instead of just university? ...
1
vote
3answers
251 views

“Silence” and “silently”: What is the name of the relation between these words?

Consider: Silence is a noun. Silent is an adjective. Silently is an adverb. Silence! is an interjection. Not sure how these words actually evolved, but they were likely all derived from the noun ...
-1
votes
2answers
132 views

Suppose that one were to concatenate *-ology* and *science* to derive a new word, what rules would determine its spelling?

I've asked this specific question as a means to learning about the rules that determine, or patterns that describe, the spellings of derived words. Suppose that someone were to concatenate -ology ...
2
votes
2answers
321 views

Conjugations of Ancillary

Ancillary is already something of an uncommon word in conversation, but it came up recently in a StackOverflow chat room in the following example: Person 1: "Are you talking about me?" Person 2: ...