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1answer
60 views

Should there be a comma after this adverbial phrase?

From the moment I saw him I knew this wouldn't work out. OR From the moment I saw him, I knew this wouldn't work out. It just doesn't seem to flow as well in the second version. Which ...
2
votes
1answer
166 views

Is this a sentence fragment…?

Ok, so here is an example sentence. "I hoped to lose the race so I wouldn't have to run against him." Here's my dilemma. I was questioning whether a comma was necessary after "race" to separate ...
6
votes
1answer
65 views

Problem converting 'even though' clause to 'despite' clause: 'Despite losing…'

I stumbled across this question in 'Intermediate Language Practice' by Michael Vince: 'Even though they were losing at half-time, City won in the end. Despite________________________________' The ...
0
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2answers
42 views

Commas to separate a dependent clause or not?

I'm writing about a player playing a game and probabilities. I tried to cut down the sentence, so don't concentrate too much on the sense rather than the commas. Would you write my sentence like this ...
0
votes
2answers
108 views

Aren't answers to questions dependent clauses? How do you punctuate one after the question?

For example, which one(s) is correct: Why did the chicken cross the road? To get to the other side. Why did the chicken cross the road: to get to the other side. Why did the chicken cross the ...
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2answers
67 views

Can I add a comma here just for “rhythm”?

I have the following sentence in a technical paper: Recent research has addressed this issue in two important ways: by developing and improving on automatic algorithms and by exploring ...
0
votes
2answers
53 views

Punctuation to separate clauses: “What is X _ now that Y?”

In sentences like: What is your name _ now that you have changed it? Where do they live _ now that the coal industry has collapsed? Why are we still here _ now that the election is over? ...
0
votes
1answer
101 views

Dependent clause, phrases, and fragments

Is a dependent clause considered a fragment? Are all fragments considered to be a dependent clause? Or is fragment like an umbrella where dependent clauses and phrases can be found? Thanks for any ...
-3
votes
3answers
165 views

Can I use the word “not” after a preposition?

Can I write something like: among people from that country and among people from not I know it can be easily rewritten as: among people that are from the country and among people that are ...
0
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0answers
21 views

I need this question about a conditional clause answered [duplicate]

Today, I Tweeted the following: "If today wasn't a good day, tomorrow is a new day." My friend Tweeted me back, saying, "You should have used 'weren't' instead of 'wasn't'." Which one is correct?
1
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0answers
17 views

“If you know what X is” or “if you know what is X” [duplicate]

Recently I encountered the phrase "If you know what is QQ then(...)". The writer wasn't a native English speaker(neither me). First, I thought it should be "If you know what QQ is ...". But then, I ...
1
vote
1answer
143 views

Restrictive relative clause or non-restrictive relative clause?

I am wondering whether to use a restrictive relative clause such as: "Multicopters belong to a family of aircraft called rotorcraft , which also includes helicopters, and although they appear to be ...
-4
votes
3answers
829 views

WHY should I put comma after a dependent clause?

For example, If you vote, you can have a say. Or you'd also have to put a comma after any other dependent clause beginning a sentence. So we should put a comma after dependent clause—why?
-3
votes
1answer
485 views

Usage of “I am afraid” [closed]

What kind of sentence should follow the phrase "I am afraid", assertive or interogative? For example, is the following sentence grammatical? I am afraid is it appropriate ask me a copy of it.
1
vote
1answer
80 views

The cheaper the car, the easier to buy it

I have a technical sentence that is: The lower the mixing paramter, the more obvious the clustering structure and thus the easier to identify the correct clustering structure. My question is ...
1
vote
0answers
139 views

Origin of actual order pattern in English [closed]

It is well-known, or better said, well-accepted, that the ancestral language Proto-Indo-European (PIE) was a OV language with a very limited (or nonexistent) use of subordinate clauses. In ...
1
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2answers
98 views

“Until you apologised” vs. “until you have apologised” vs. “until you apologise”

What is the most correct way of saying to someone that I won't speak to him before he has apologised. I won't speak to you until you have apologised for what you have done. I won't speak to ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Do I use “be” or “is” in this sentence? [duplicate]

Which of the following is correct? I request that my proposal is communicated to the team for necessary action. I request that my proposal be communicated to the team for necessary action. ...
0
votes
1answer
557 views

Can a subordinate clause split subject and verb in the main clause?

E.g. are these correct? Following the rules, even if it's difficult, is essential. Following the rules, although it's difficult, is essential.
3
votes
3answers
601 views

Breaking comma rules to emphasize a pause in a character quote or elsewhere

My wife is writing a book, and just got a draft back from an editor. The editor noted extra commas in numerous sentences like this: He looked at her closely, but all she said was, "I am truly ...