2
votes
1answer
344 views

Definite article usage: “I'm going to mosque” Or “I'm going to the mosque”?

AS Hornby says in one of his books that we should always use the before mosque, and temple unlike church. When we go to a church for prayer, we say I am going to church while we say I am ...
1
vote
1answer
7k views

“Listen to music” vs. “listen to the music”

English is not my mother tongue. I once came across information that listening to music and listening to the music mean something different. Listening to the music would mean you put whole heart into ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

“All X” vs. “all of X” vs. “all the X”

Is there any difference between "all X", "all of the X", "all the X"? E.g., all friends all of the friends all the friends
6
votes
1answer
174 views

“An” average of vs. “The” average of

When nouns such as average, total, sum, etc., are modified by a prepositional phrase, how do you choose between the definite and indefinite articles? I cited sentences 1, 3, and 5 below from various ...
2
votes
2answers
765 views

“To be elected chairman” vs. “to be elected the chairman”

I have a question regarding the correct use of the definite article "the": One of my books says: Definite article the is used before nouns denoting a position that can be held by one person ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Is it “out of question” or “out of the question”?

Are they used in different contexts? Those both of them use correct grammar? Google fight shows that "out of the question" appear 10 times more often than the other.
5
votes
4answers
360 views

US Route 101 — “The 101”

In my part of the world, we refer to highways without any article. So we drive on "Highway 64", or "Interstate 64", or "I-64". But when I go to California, they say "The 101". Is there any explanation ...