Questions relating to the English Language usage when referring to dates

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1answer
31 views

in/on with dmy dates

When writing dates in prose in the dmy format (29 March 2014), is the correct preposition "in" or "on". I'm seeing it with "in" here, but that construction is foreign to me. It was released in 29 ...
2
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1answer
45 views

Is Days of Week acceptable plural of Day of Week? [closed]

Can I say "Days of Week" or would that be "Days of the Week", or is there another, better way to express this? I'm writing a computer program that asks for, stores and displays a Day Of Week list. ...
2
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4answers
166 views

Do I refer to the previous month or to the last month

I'd like to ask about the difference between "last month" and "previous month", if there is any. I am a software developer and I use those relative words as a search input values for date search. I am ...
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1answer
37 views

Location of day of week in non-U.S. long format dates?

In the United States, the long/expanded/full form of a date with day of the week is: Monday, February 24, 2014 I understand in other countries the long date form is often: 24 February 2014 So ...
2
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2answers
81 views

Using “on” before days or dates

I've noticed that on many American TV shows, the speakers generally don't use the word "on" before names of days or before dates. For example: I'll see you Monday. Shouldn't it be: I'll see you on ...
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2answers
88 views

Sunday as a Week Marker

When someone uses the phrase "the week of the [Sunday's date]" does that usually refer to the week preceding that Sunday or after it?
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1answer
63 views

Writing deadlines

I'm currently using the following date format for setting deadlines: Monday, 27 January 2014, 3 PM My questions are: Should I mention time at the beginning or leave it at the end? Should I ...
3
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2answers
168 views

“On the first of every month” vs. “every first of the month”

What is the difference between the following two? On the first of every month... Every first of the month...
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3answers
182 views

How to write a date range (e.g., 6 May to 8 June) in a way that is concise and unambiguous?

In general, I try to write dates as one of: 2014-01-03 3 Jan 2013 3 January 2013 avoiding slashes altogether so as to avoid any ambiguity with American date formats. That said, I've never found a ...
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2answers
193 views

When writing the date, why do we write “8th December 2013”, instead of “8th of December, 2013”?

I've always been taught to write it alike the former, but personally, I think the latter looks better. Why is it that most people write it alike the former?
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3answers
960 views

It is correct and formal to include “of” when writing dates?

A friend of mine, native EN speaker, told me that the following is correct written like this: We met on the 1st of June. Is that really true? I cannot see any reference that these are used in ...
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3answers
793 views

What time is 12.00pm? [duplicate]

There is a sign outside a shop near us which says 'Parking for loading vehicles only from 7 to 12pm'. Does that mean between 7pm and midnight, or between 7am and noon? For me 12.00 is neither ...
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1answer
65 views

Spelling of contracted years

Full years can be contracted to two digits like He graduated the university in '92. What I'd like to ask is how would this sentence be spelled out: "in 'ninety two"? "in ninety two"? maybe, ...
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5answers
283 views

Which sentence is most acceptable when describing the current time period?

I would like to know which of these two sentences have the most acceptable form when describing the current time period. Why do so many people **today** have no values Why do so many people have no ...
2
votes
3answers
101 views

“the class of 1991” versus “the class of '91” [duplicate]

which one is used? and if you have "the class of 2001" is it more proper the former or the latter ("the class of 2001" or "the class of '01" or "the class of '1")? and are there differences between ...
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2answers
1k views

What are the abbreviations for days of the week? [closed]

I would like to know if there is a common abbreviation for days of the week in a two letter form. I mean: Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday; can be abbreviated as Su, Mo, ...
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2answers
131 views

How to say two dates are the same?

I have a prompt that allows the user to input a date used to generate a report. The date is used to find records. date is on MM/DD/YY date is before MM/DD/YY date is after MM/DD/YY date is between ...
3
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4answers
338 views

Describing event with “greatest” date value

I'm struggling with a way to describe one of a series of datetime values that has the greatest value. My first thought would be to call it the "latest", but the suggests that the event is in the ...
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2answers
310 views

Do I capitalize or write out 'first' if I write: “Her birthday was May First.”?

I'm writing a story in which a character's birthday (May 1st) is significant. A characters notes in conversation that, "Her birthday is May first." Should I write out 'first' or refer to it as '1st'? ...
3
votes
1answer
289 views

How do we write years before AD 1000?

For years with 4 digits, usually we write it this way: George was born in the year 1732. or George was born in 1732. What about years with three, two, or even one digit? Are the below ...
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2answers
149 views

A question about date [duplicate]

A standard date question would be: What date is it today? But is What date is today? acceptable?
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1answer
828 views

Is “to” inclusive in “I worked at company X from April 2012 to April 2013”? [duplicate]

I have a question about the use of the word to as a time proposition. Is to inclusive in the following sentence? I worked at company X from April 2012 to April 2013.
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3answers
1k views

How to use AP Style commas after dates

I was wondering how you are supposed to use commas after full dates in AP style. I've been told to always put a comma after the year, like in the sentence: On April 4th, 2012, I found a cat. ...
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6answers
4k views

“Since”, “until”, “from”, “to” on invoices or date ranges of a form

Which is the correct form on an invoice, or a general date range in a form, and why? Monkey dolls 12 GBP From 2012-01-03 to 2013-01-02 Monkey dolls 12 ...
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2answers
2k views

Is “resign with effect from [date]” inclusive?

I am resigning from my post with effect from 15th April. Does this imply that April 14th will be my last working day, or will it be April 15th?
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2answers
112 views

“What time?” instead of “What day?”

I was talking with a friend about an event that was going to happen in the future. He asked me "What time?" referring, as I discovered after a while, to the day this event was going to happen. I ...
0
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1answer
916 views

Do phrases such as “by tomorrow” or “by Thursday” include the day mentioned? [duplicate]

I wasn't sure how to research this without being able to explain what I mean. When someone says something like "I will have it done by tomorrow", does that phrase mean that they will have it done ...
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2answers
3k views

What's the correct way to format a date range, time range, and days of week in a single line? [closed]

I'd like to write the date and time for an event that runs for one week. Currently I have: ​ June 3-7, 2013, 8:30am-5:30pm; Monday-Friday Is this stylistically acceptable? Is there a better way? ...
5
votes
2answers
360 views

How to properly say that a given day/date does not exist?

I wanted to use this, but I don't know if it's actually valid in English: The specified date is invalid.It points to a non-existing day. I'm not a native speaker, and I just want to say that the ...
2
votes
3answers
433 views

Written date formats in US English: how jarring is it to use the UK format?

In general, there is a difference between the common spoken ordering of dates between US and UK usage. So in the UK, we would tend to say: "the 14th of December, 2005" while in the US, people ...
0
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1answer
345 views

Pronunciation of “Jan. 3” [closed]

Is a date written “Jan. 3” pronounced January third, or is it pronounced January three?
2
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5answers
601 views

What does “by spring 2013” imply? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does “notified by [date]” include the end date? “I will do it by Monday”. Does it mean before the beginning or before the end of Monday? If something has to be ...
5
votes
1answer
807 views

When is Christmas Eve Eve?

I have recently seen weather forecasters making predictions for Christmas Eve Day, Christmas Eve Night, and for Christmas Day. One also reads of Christmas Eve Eve, with two eves. Are those all ...
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1answer
755 views

Definite article and dates without ordinal indicators

Where ordinal indicators are not used, which of the following is correct? We will go ahead on the 7 January 2013. We will go ahead on 7 January 2013.
5
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2answers
21k views

How to write “till now” in a résumé? [closed]

I am writing a résumé. I want to specify that I started my education in 2009 and as of now I am at the 4th grade (in other words, still learning), so how should I specify that in résumé: 2009 - ...
0
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2answers
533 views

Twenty-Fifth or 25th? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the best format to use when writing out dates? In represent a time and date, which of the following is the most proper (did I even frame this question right?) ...
0
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1answer
179 views

Three years: current (2012), last (2011), but is there a term then for 2010?

I have three years I am putting on a chart: current year, last year, and I'm not sure what to call the year that came before the last. Does it have a name? Would it be "pre-last"?
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1answer
559 views

Saying dates in English [closed]

Are these dates correctly pronounced? Should it be 'dash' or 'hyphen'? Roman one, or '/aɪ/'? 27/I-1980, twenty-seven, slash, Roman one, dash/hypen, nineteen eighty 4/II-1936 Four slash Roman two ...
0
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1answer
81 views

Is on/before 15 July better than by 15 July if I want to be precise and unambiguous? Which is the more common form?

When the last day of registration is, let's say, 15 July, we currently say "please confirm your registration before 16 July" but students often send their confirmation on 16 July, rather than 15. I ...
0
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3answers
5k views

Published at vs published on? [closed]

I need to name a column in a table and I'm wondering what the best option is. Should it be "Published at" or "Published on"? I only need to store a full date and time. From some search I did, it ...
3
votes
3answers
970 views

using phrase “weekend of”

Say the 24th is a Monday and you say that you’ll be doing something the weekend of the 24th, meaning the 22nd and 23rd. Isn’t that incorrect? I would say the weekend of the 24th means the 29th and ...
0
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3answers
18k views

“I will do it by Monday”. Does it mean before the beginning or before the end of Monday? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does “notified by [date]” include the end date? When someone says "I will do it by Monday", does it mean that they will get it done before the beginning of ...
9
votes
3answers
39k views

Date format in UK vs US

Why is the most common date format in the US like mm/dd/yyyy, whereas in Europe (including the UK) it's more common to have dd/mm/yyyy? Looking around, I found that the US form is actually the more ...
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2answers
1k views

How to write out dates correctly

I have a document dated 05/05/2012. What should I say? Based on the document from 05 May. Based on the document from 5th May. Based on the document from 05 of May.
4
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4answers
2k views

“Wednesday week”

I know that the English will say "Wednesday week" to mean a week from Wednesday. Is there a name for this sort of construction? Also, I have a friend from India who will say "today morning". Is ...
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0answers
58 views

“Please finish this by May 15” — can I still do it today? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does “notified by [date]” include the end date? Today is May 15. I have an email in my inbox that says Please respond by May 15. My question is: what ...
2
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0answers
87 views

Is “do something by date X” inclusive? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does “notified by [date]” include the end date? For example, if John says: Return it to me by March 24th. Does it mean that I need to return it to ...
0
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3answers
225 views

Date formats for Americans [closed]

Do Americans find a date such as 11 Apr 2012 more readable than the ISO format 2012-04-11? The reason I ask is that there are many situations where we do not have access to the locale, and even if we ...
4
votes
4answers
21k views

Does the term “within 7 days” mean include the 7th day? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is “in [some period]” different from “within [some period]”? The title states it all: When an author says "within 7 days", does the author mean ...
2
votes
1answer
246 views

How to specify dates in a U.S. résumé?

What is the correct (or at least preferred) way of formatting dates in a résumé whenever you don't need to specify a day? For example, I am using the format “May 2011”, but I don’t know whether I ...