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Why is the unit of measure placed before the value for currencies? Are there other measures where the unit precedes value?

$1,000 is pronounced as "one thousand dollars". Reading from left to right, it seems like it would make more sense to write the value as: 1,000$. This way the pronunciation of the value follows the ...
24
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4answers
6k views

What does President Obama's “pro-knowledge” remark mean?

Today’s (May 17) New Yorker carries an article written by Andy Borowitz under the title, “Obama alienates millions with incendiary pro-knowledge remarks," which begins with the following passage: ...
20
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4answers
4k views

Is “You ain’t seen nothin’ yet” a common or respectable English expression?

Today’s edition of the New York Times (December 16, 2014) carries an article written by Mark Bittman under the headline “You ain’t seen nothin’ yet.” It begins with the following passage: “What’s ...
19
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4answers
4k views

What does Mr. Trump’s “inner rabbit” mean?

There was an article written by Gail Collins, op-ed columnist in the New York Times (February 19) under the title, “Trump Shows His Inner Rabbit.” The article starts with the passage; I am sorry ...
17
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5answers
49k views

€10 = “ten euro” or “ten euros”?

Which is the correct form: "ten euro" or "ten euros"?
14
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8answers
19k views

What does “soft bigotry of low expectations” mean?

There was the following question from a reader and the answer by Charles Blow under the headline, “Your Questions, Answered” in the Opinion Page of May 7 New York Times. I invited you to ask me ...
13
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2answers
2k views

What does “Small words” in “They are small words that reflect a dark and negative point of view.”?

Washington Post (June 27) picked up Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s comment digging in Sen. Wendy Davis for her filibustering the abortion bill in his speech delivered at a convention of the National Right to ...
12
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4answers
3k views

Is “Ur-moment” a normal English expression?

The New York Times article of this past July 29th titled, “The D.O. Is In Now: Osteopathic Schools Turn Out Nearly a Third of All Med School Grads,” features the growing popularity of the Touro ...
10
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6answers
2k views

What does “Awesome” mean when you are complimented by an Apple-shop salesclerk on your answer to a barrage of his questions?

“London. Hello, Awesome” is a comparative culture essay written by a writer at large of the New York Times who returned to her post in New York office from England after 18 years, and it wraps up with ...
10
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4answers
42k views

Should it be 10 US$ or US$ 10?

Which is correct to use in a sentence, 10 US$ or US$ 10. Perhaps USD should be used instead or even something else?
9
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4answers
1k views

What does “medical scare” mean?

Today’s(September 25)Time magazine reports that: “Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen is feeling "fine" following a brief medical scare during an evening speech. Yellen was speaking at the University ...
9
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2answers
140 views

What does “crawl over a pile of hot coals” mean?

Subsequent to my question about “within an inch of one’s life” in Vanity Fair magazine, Emily Jane’s article, “Megyn Kelly slams media “Bias against Trump” for criticism of her prime-time special” ...
8
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6answers
19k views

What does “Come-to Jesus (moment / stage / meeting)” mean? Is it a popular word?

There was the following sentence in Maureen Dowd’s article titled, “The spies who didn’t love her” in New York Times (March 11). Barack Obama-- vowing to clean up the excesses and Constitutional ...
8
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3answers
463 views

The usage of “banzai”

I started to reread a pretty old mystery of Thomas Harris, “The silence of the lambs,” which I once gave up reading because of difficulty of understanding the narrative studded with technical jargons ...
8
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4answers
10k views

Is ‘on (in) a tear’ a popular idiom?

I was drawn to the phrase, ‘on a tear’ that I heard in audio in this week’s Barron’s magazine (June 6) reporting the good sales and profit performance of U.S. sneaker chain, Foot Locker: It says: ...
7
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1answer
2k views

How to correctly write a range of currency

Currency is usually written with the type prefixed, e.g. $52. However, what is the correct way to write a currency range? For example, the inclusive range of 'between 14 and 90 dollars' could be ...
7
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1answer
602 views

English term that groups notes and coins of a currency

I'm programming a web application and I need to name the "class of things" that are notes and coins. So far the best I could find was "currency piece". Is that the correct way of naming the notes ...
7
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3answers
8k views

Are monetary values plural? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are units in English singular or plural? I want to say: Those sixty dollars are gone That sixty dollars is gone The reason I ask is because I was originally ...
6
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3answers
410 views

Is “since-folded (TV network)” an accustomed English word?

Time magazine (August 29) reports that Sara Palin has launched her own Internet Television network in its Entertainment TV section. It says; “Palin’s not the first candidate to lose an election ...
6
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3answers
588 views

What does “the New York egoscape “ mean?

I was interested in the word, “egoscape” used in the following paragraph of the New Yorker magazine’s (March 14) article written by David Remnick under the title “American Demagogue”: “For a long ...
6
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2answers
757 views

Is “release one’s butt cheeks” a euphemism?

It was interesting to learn the English language (any language would be) is spoken or heard differently by the person in the following sentence of Tina Fey’s “Bossypants,” describing the scene in ...
6
votes
1answer
571 views

What does “Wonk gap” mean in brief?

I came across the word, “The wonk gap” used as the headline of the article written by Paul Krugman in New York Times’ September 8 issue. The word reappears in the following sentence: Senator Rand ...
5
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3answers
433 views

Does ‘legit intel” pass as a usual English word?

I found the word, “legit intel” in the following sentence of Maureen Dowd’s article titled “Shadow of a Doubt” in today’s (September 3) New York Times. ...
5
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2answers
441 views

What does “media (news) disruptor” mean?

There is the following passage in the article titled, “Why disruptors are always white guys” in New York Magazine September 10 issue: “It’s happening again. There’s a list of “media disruptors.” ...
5
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2answers
122 views

Is the phrase “Corporate Daddy” getting currency, or is it just a one-off coinage?

I was attracted to the word of the headline, “The Corporate Daddy: Wal-Mart, Starbucks, and the fight against inequality” of an article in New York Times (June 19), which was written by Timothy Egan, ...
5
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2answers
198 views

Is “She-economy” getting currency?

I happened to find the word, “Sheconomy” in the Time magazine’s (November 22, 2010) article titled “Woman power: The rise of the sheconomy.” The author, Belinda Luscombe writes; “What these two ...
4
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2answers
102 views

Can the word, “OK’er,” be used in other area than copy editing?

I recently heard the word,’OK’er” in the New Yorker’s Live video, in which Mary Norris, New Yorker’s copy editor and author of "How I proofread my way to Philip Roth’s heart,” “Between You & Me on ...
4
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3answers
3k views

Does the expression, “As sound as a pound” still holds its currency?

There is the following sentence in the New York Time’s (July 24) article titled, “A Chinese gold standard?” written by its Op-Ed Contributor, Kwasi Kwarteng. “For most of the 19th century the ...
4
votes
4answers
305 views

Are “Real class” and “Paper class” well-received pair words?

Today’s (October 23) Time magazine and New Yorker carried articles dealing with a report of academic scandal of the University of North Carolina under the respective headline, “North Carolina releases ...
4
votes
2answers
505 views

Is the word, “kinda-sorta” accepted as a normal word to be used in writing?

I was drawn to the word, “kinda, sorta” which appeared in the article of Time magazine (April 27) under the headline, “The Clippers Should Have Boycotted Game After Owner’s Racist Remarks”: The ...
4
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3answers
2k views

List of plural names of currencies?

Is anyone aware of a list of plural names of currencies? I don't really care what conventions are used; I just want to avoid using an obviously wrong plural form.
4
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1answer
372 views

Dollar sign necessary in “$16 LD”?

I'm editing a book that mentions Liberian Dollars (LD) and U.S. Dollars (USD). Should I put a dollar sign in front of the number or not? ($16 LD or 16 LD? $10 USD or 10 USD?)
4
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1answer
319 views

What does “literary stylist” mean? Is it a characteristic or a profession?

The following passage in an article in The Guardian titled Occupy was right: Capitalism failed the world (April 13, 2014) comments on Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the twenty-first century, a work of ...
3
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3answers
609 views

What does “Empty dress” exactly mean?

Washington Post (May 22) reported the victory of the 35-year-old Alison Lundergan Grimes in Kentucky Democratic primary to position her as the challenger to 72-year-old Senate’s GOP leader, Mitch ...
3
votes
3answers
365 views

Is “Grey tsunami” a mere metaphor, or acknowledged phrase to represent for accelerated global increase of old age population?

The article of the Economics (April 26, 2014) titled “Demography, growth and inequality; Age invaders” ends up with the following passages: It (shift to ageing population) will be a world in which ...
3
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2answers
5k views

Case of USD — “United States Dollar” or “United States dollar”

What is correct, United States dollar or United States Dollar? In the examples below the emphasis is mine. Example 1 (context) The United States dollar (sign: $; code: USD; also abbreviated US$) ...
3
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2answers
227 views

What does “cheffed-up” in “Traditional ramen that hasn’t been cheffed-up” mean?

In connection with my previous question about the meaning of the line, “This is a lot of cargo for noodle soup” in NYT’s (March 4, 2014) article, “Ramen’s Big Splash,” in its Dining & Wine ...
3
votes
1answer
188 views

Who are “Security moms”?

I came across the word, “Security mom” and “Wal-Mart mom” in the following statement in my newspaper clippings, originally in Time: Can Obama Win Back Wal-Mart Moms? "The women that are different ...
3
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2answers
240 views

Is ‘scooplet’ a popular word?

I came across the word, ‘scooplet’ in the statement of New York times’ reporter in its “What we are reading section” (October 24). Carolyn Ryan introduces “Time Machine” written by Kitty Kelley by ...
3
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2answers
172 views

What does “fall for a bluff” mean? [closed]

New York Times (August 6) reported under the title, “25 years after Gardner Museum heist, video raises questions” that Federal officials released a video tape recording a guardsman, Richard Abath’s ...
3
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2answers
809 views

Is the phrase, “Let ‘em up easy” Abraham Lincoln’s one-off phrase or an obsolete idiom?

I came across the phrase, “Let’em up easy,” in the following sentence in the section of “1864 Reelection” of “Abraham Lincoln” in Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: "Reconstruction began during the ...
3
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2answers
2k views

Lean in and lean out

There was an article titled “Forget Leaning In, Let's Talk about Leaning Out” in Forbes magazine (April 2. 2014) in which the author, Caroline Mayer says: “I don’t know about you, but I’ve heard ...
3
votes
2answers
279 views

What does ‘Reverse fig leaf” mean?

I was interested in the word, “Reverse fig leaf” in an article titled, “Should Germans read ‘Mein Kampf” appearing in New York Times (July 7), which deals with the planned publication of Adolf ...
2
votes
3answers
239 views

Is “Click bait” an Internet buzzword? How can I rephrase it?

I found a video showing a fireman who rescued a suffocating kitten from a fire smoke and resuscitated her by oxygen inhalation introduced in the article titled “Why that video went viral” in New York ...
2
votes
1answer
161 views

Is “two-Perrier” lunch a businessmen’s buzz word?

There was a line, “He was not one for two-Perrier lunch,” in the eulogy for a British politician who made a great contribution to the formation of E.U. system. Also there is the following passage in ...
2
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4answers
529 views

Is there a word for the small of currency, eg, cents, pence, etc?

I am writing some instructions and I want my audience to understand that an amount must be entered in cents / pence / Eurocents / Satoshis etc. Is there a word that describes these small, granular ...
2
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2answers
144 views

What does “Retail politics” mean? Is it an established political term?

I come across the word, “retail (oriented) politics” in an article under the title, “All presidential politics is local” in Conway Daily Sun (December 23, 2015), which contained the following ...
2
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2answers
878 views

What does “triple down” in “Trump triples down on George W. Bush’s responsibility for 9/11”mean?

A Washington Post (October 18) article begins with the following passage under the headline, “Trump triples down on George W. Bush’s responsibility for 9/11.” Donald Trump says he doesn’t flat out ...
2
votes
1answer
89 views

Is “pre-spin” a common word?

I was drawn to the word, “pre-spin” in the following passage in New York Times’ (October 9) article that came under the title, “From Donald Trump, hints of a campaign exit strategy.”: “Stuart ...
2
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2answers
87 views

Is “over-babble” a common word usable in day-to-day conversation?

There was the following passage in New York Times (May 14) article under the title, “Wow, Jeb Bush is awful.”: "The bottom line is that so far he seems to be a terrible candidate. He couldn’t ...