The tag has no wiki summary.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
1answer
24 views

Is “cheese-stick operation, manufacturing, building current word?

I was drawn to the word, “cheese-stick” appearing in the article titled, “The book that didn’t exist” in the Opinion Pages of New York Times (April 14), which deals with the art and craft of writing. ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

Is the word, ‘nerdocracy’ just a nonce word, or becoming current?

I was drawn to the word, ‘nerdocracy’ appearing in an article in New York Times’ TV Watch section under the title, “Start-Ups and Upstarts.” It reads; “There is a relatively new social order ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

Is “un-grown-up” a common, or not so common word?

I came across a word, “un-grown-up” in Jeffery Archer’s fiction, “The Prodigal Daughter.” In the scene, the heroine, Florentyna Rosnovski asks her governess if her father, the owner of a hotel empire, ...
7
votes
4answers
1k views

What does “Come-to Jesus (moment / stage / meeting)” mean? Is it a popular word?

There was the following sentence in Maureen Dowd’s article titled, “The spies who didn’t love her” in New York Times (March 11). Barack Obama-- vowing to clean up the excesses and Constitutional ...
4
votes
3answers
108 views

List of plural names of currencies?

Is anyone aware of a list of plural names of currencies? I don't really care what conventions are used; I just want to avoid using an obviously wrong plural form.
1
vote
1answer
91 views

Is the word “mid-shelf” applicable to any merchandize being sold at retail shops more than liquor?

There was the following sentence in Time magazine (September 16) titled “The world according to Vladimir Putin.” The nation that put the first man into space has given the world no distinctly ...
-1
votes
2answers
105 views

Does the words, “Love interests” and “Love intelligence” have a special meaning other than plain “love affair” and “love gossip”?

I was drawn to the words, “Love interest” and “Love intelligence” appearing in Maureen Dowd’s article, “Creeping Crowd” which dealt with the N.S.A.’s domestic surveillance, in Sept 28 New York Times. ...
-1
votes
1answer
147 views

What does “Love arrives with a bonk on the head with a balloon” mean?

The New York Time’s (September 12) article in Theatre section titled “Letting Lips Do What Hands Do” with a sub-head, “ A voice instructor for the leads in ‘Romeo and Juliet” bigins with the following ...
2
votes
1answer
821 views

Is “play chess when others are playing checkers,” a well-known / well-used phrase?

I found the phrase, “he’s always playing chess when others are playing checkers,” in today’s (September 11) article of New York Times, written by Charles Blow under the headline of “It’s a Mad, Mad, ...
6
votes
1answer
334 views

What does “Wonk gap” mean in brief?

I came across the word, “The wonk gap” used as the headline of the article written by Paul Krugman in New York Times’ September 8 issue. The word reappears in the following sentence: Senator Rand ...
-1
votes
2answers
897 views

What does “I really get the juices flowing when I’m driving” mean?

New York Times article “In golf, moments good and bad are well remembered” (June 14) ends up with the following episode: "Jerry Kelly (PGA golfer) said that his steely memory of golf extended to ...
5
votes
2answers
121 views

Is “She-economy” getting currency?

I happened to find the word, “Sheconomy” in the Time magazine’s (November 22, 2010) article titled “Woman power: The rise of the sheconomy.” The author, Belinda Luscombe writes; “What these two ...
5
votes
3answers
202 views

Does ‘legit intel” pass as a usual English word?

I found the word, “legit intel” in the following sentence of Maureen Dowd’s article titled “Shadow of a Doubt” in today’s (September 3) New York Times. ...
10
votes
6answers
969 views

What does “Awesome” mean when you are complimented by an Apple-shop salesclerk on your answer to a barrage of his questions?

“London. Hello, Awesome” is a comparative culture essay written by a writer at large of the New York Times who returned to her post in New York office from England after 18 years, and it wraps up with ...
2
votes
1answer
82 views

Is “closed press (remark / ceremony / meeting)” a popular English word?

I saw the word, “closed press” in Time magazine’s (August 15) article titled “Chris Christie lays out argument for 2016.” “Christie spoke at length about his record in New Jersey, emphasizing ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

Is ‘celebvocate’ becoming a currency?

I saw the word, “celebvocate” in “Editor’s Pick” section in today’s (July 14) Washington Post which comes under the caption, “When ‘celebvocates’ come to D.C.” and followed by the lead copy: “Here ...
3
votes
2answers
165 views

Is the phrase, “Let ‘em up easy” Abraham Lincoln’s one-off phrase or an obsolete idiom?

I came across the phrase, “Let’em up easy,” in the following sentence in the section of “1864 Reelection” of “Abraham Lincoln” in Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: "Reconstruction began during the ...
13
votes
2answers
519 views

What does “Small words” in “They are small words that reflect a dark and negative point of view.”?

Washington Post (June 27) picked up Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s comment digging in Sen. Wendy Davis for her filibustering the abortion bill in his speech delivered at a convention of the National Right to ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

Is ‘on (in) a tear’ a popular idiom?

I was drawn to the phrase, ‘on a tear’ that I heard in audio in this week’s Barron’s magazine (June 6) reporting the good sales and profit performance of U.S. sneaker chain, Foot Locker: It says: ...
3
votes
1answer
172 views

Dollar sign necessary in “$16 LD”?

I'm editing a book that mentions Liberian Dollars (LD) and U.S. Dollars (USD). Should I put a dollar sign in front of the number or not? ($16 LD or 16 LD? $10 USD or 10 USD?)
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Are monetary values plural? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are units in English singular or plural? I want to say: Those sixty dollars are gone That sixty dollars is gone The reason I ask is because I was originally ...
0
votes
2answers
11k views

How to spell out dollars and cents [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to say the total amount? Which is the correct way to spell out dollars and cents? Forty-Two Thousand Dollars and 00/100 ($42,000.00) or Forty-Two Thousand ...
0
votes
4answers
17k views

How to say the total amount?

I'm not sure if the saying of the total amount USD 23,428.32 is correct below (esp. the 'cent' part after the dot): Say U.S. dollars twenty-three thousand four hundred and twenty-eight and ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

Correct way to write a range of dollar figures

What is the best way to express the range from $4.5 billion to $5.2 billion? Is the following correct? ... between $4.5 and $5.2 billion...
16
votes
5answers
2k views

Why is the unit of measure placed before the value for currencies? Are there other measures where the unit precedes value?

$1,000 is pronounced as "one thousand dollars". Reading from left to right, it seems like it would make more sense to write the value as: 1,000$. This way the pronunciation of the value follows the ...
7
votes
3answers
10k views

Should it be 10 US$ or US$ 10?

Which is correct to use in a sentence, 10 US$ or US$ 10. Perhaps USD should be used instead or even something else?
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Case of USD — “United States Dollar” or “United States dollar”

What is correct, United States dollar or United States Dollar? In the examples below the emphasis is mine. Example 1 (context) The United States dollar (sign: $; code: USD; also abbreviated US$) ...
0
votes
1answer
613 views

Pluralization rule is different when we say, 10 pound note and 10 pounds? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Pluralization rule for “five-year-old children”, “20 pound note”, “10 mile run” We usually say "10 pounds", but for a single bill we ...
6
votes
1answer
809 views

How to correctly write a range of currency

Currency is usually written with the type prefixed, e.g. $52. However, what is the correct way to write a currency range? For example, the inclusive range of 'between 14 and 90 dollars' could be ...
13
votes
4answers
14k views

€10 = “ten euro” or “ten euros”?

Which is the correct form: "ten euro" or "ten euros"?
7
votes
1answer
359 views

English term that groups notes and coins of a currency

I'm programming a web application and I need to name the "class of things" that are notes and coins. So far the best I could find was "currency piece". Is that the correct way of naming the notes ...