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1answer
61 views

Numbers / number

By looking at the graph above, should numbers or number be used in this context? Overall, the numbers of international tourists arrived in these five countries had increased over the period ...
2
votes
1answer
119 views

One type of good - singular or plural

I've read conflicting advice on the use of the word "goods" in an economic context (e.g. "goods for sale"). One piece of advice is that it is a plural noun that should never be used singular (e.g. ...
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3answers
98 views

Why do we say “What do you do for a living”?

What does "a" (the indefinite article) imply in this context?
2
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1answer
257 views

Is “I've told you at fewest ten times” grammatical?

After this question was put on hold, I am editing this to clarify that I am not seeking "the most wrong answer," but that I am instead asking for a reason for the continued use of a construction that ...
1
vote
2answers
115 views

Should an article be used for the word “war”?

I’ve been reading much about the US poverty war recently. Some people say: He declared the war on poverty fifty years ago. But others say: He declared war on poverty fifty years ago. ...
0
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1answer
73 views

when does the noun “time” become a countable noun?

I am writing an email to my friend and want to use this sentence: "I am having a great time." I would like to know whether the above sentence is correct. Also, I know that time can be an ...
1
vote
1answer
91 views

Is there a countable form for “literature”?

Literature is an uncountable noun, so we can't say one literature or two literatures. But is there a countable form, as there is for information? One piece of information, for instance.
2
votes
3answers
82 views

The article of X in “a change of X”

Why can we say "a change of address", "a change of plan", etc. without any articles in front of "address" and "plan"? Aren't they countable nouns? Is it some kind of idiom for "a change of X" or a ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Compound words/noun phrases in english with different number of words in plural/singular form

Are there any cases where the plural and singular form of an English compound word or noun phrase differ in the number of words contained? In all cases I can think of, the actual words within the ...
0
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2answers
258 views

Are frozen pizzas countable or uncountable?

As you know pizzas are countable But when you add another word like, frozen, does it remain countable? Generally, when you add an adjective to a countable word are there any changes?
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Why is bread uncountable? How do you describe the “three breads” in the picture?

In this picture there are "three breads", but they are not loaves because loaves can be cut into pieces, and they are not slices either because they weren't cut with a knife. So the only way to ...
2
votes
1answer
538 views

There is (are) + countable plural nouns [duplicate]

I keep hearing from native speakers the phrases like these: There is a lot of cars (books, hotels) There is a couple of cars (books, hotels) There is five (ten, etc.) of cars (books, hotels) There is ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

(a) part of something [duplicate]

I've been puzzled about the usage of "part" as an uncountable noun. It often seems to me that there is no difference in meaning between its countable and uncountable form. Is there any difference in ...
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2answers
366 views

“No restriction” vs. “no restrictions”

The data center must be flexible. There should be no restriction/restrictions on user's choice of protocols. What should it be?
-3
votes
1answer
255 views

Do nonsense and bull**** have corresponding plural forms?

For example, I've heard nonsenses, but I've never heard bullshits. Why one is plural and the other is singular? They mean the same thing.
-1
votes
1answer
453 views

When saying supplier of a building material should the material be singular or plural?

Which of the following is correct: Supplier of tile, stone, tools and equipment or Supplier of tiles, stones, tools and equipment If you could provide an English rule to know that would also be ...
0
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2answers
2k views

Should we say less or fewer “fruit and vegetables”?

Fruit is uncountable but vegetables is countable, so we should use less or fewer before them together?