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1answer
28 views

Some + Countable Noun: True Only When Plural?

Assume there are multiple books on a shelf. At least one book is red. At least one book is blue. Sentence in dispute: Some of the books are red. Is this sentence false if only one book is red? ...
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1answer
40 views

“Most of what” and “is” or “are”

I've gotten into an argument about whether "Most of what I've read is books" or "Most of what I've read are books" is correct. I think it should be "is" because "most of" refers to "what I've read" ...
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2answers
45 views

Is numbers countable or uncountable? [closed]

I would like to know if you say: Too much numbers or so many numbers. Is numbers a countable or uncountable noun? and why?
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1answer
36 views

can we say 'a pain' ? or 'a piece of pain'?

Here what I'm talking about is 'pain' as a noun, describing something that makes you uncomfortable either physically or mentally. As far as I know, it is countable when describing physical hurts. ...
0
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2answers
89 views

When does an uncountable noun become countable?

I wonder why "fat" "carbohydrate" and "protein" can have the plural form as in the following quotes. Aren't those nouns uncountable? The Russian consumer protection agency said Friday it is taking ...
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2answers
102 views

Shouldn’t we use “lots of” with plural nouns and “a lot of” with singular ones?

Is it correct to say "there are a lot of aspects" like here (see the first comment) or here? Shouldn't be "lots of" used instead? I was sure that the correct form is "lots of" for the plural form.
3
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2answers
120 views

Question about “criticism” and “critique”

Are criticism and critique mass nouns? If not, what semantic area does their countable usage refer to?
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1answer
67 views

Countable vs. Uncountable Nouns [closed]

What is correct: "too much people" or "too many people"?
0
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1answer
43 views

The usage of … number(s) of [closed]

Here we wish to make sure the usage of ... number(s) of ..., which one below is correct? An even number of people An even number of cards Even numbers of people Even numbers of cards An odd ...
2
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1answer
55 views

“rising sea level” or “rising sea levels”?

I've seen both in newspapers when it comes to the subject of global warming. Confusingly, "rising sea levels" seems to be used more frequently. For me, it's much easier to understand "rising sea ...
1
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2answers
64 views

'(death) throes' - countability?

In my Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary the word 'throe' is not listed, only 'throes'. With other nouns, the dictionary clearly indicates whether nouns are countable or uncountable, however, with ...
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1answer
72 views

How to say if the word may be countable or uncountable in English?

For example: Maybe the item of travel city include more than one city, But what's the correct writing of Travel City. Should I use Travel City/Cities? Travel Date: 0503, 2014; 0504, 2014 Travel City: ...
4
votes
1answer
111 views

two uncountable nouns with and

If we had two uncountable nouns with and , would we use a singular or plural form? How much flour and butter is/are needed to make a pizza ?
0
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2answers
107 views

Conjugation of answer to “How much money is there?” [duplicate]

I'm using a website - www.ixl.com - to teach my child how to count American coins, amongst other activities. The site also has many questions on English grammar. One thing that doesn't seem right - ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Numbers / number

By looking at the graph above, should numbers or number be used in this context? Overall, the numbers of international tourists arrived in these five countries had increased over the period ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

One type of good - singular or plural

I've read conflicting advice on the use of the word "goods" in an economic context (e.g. "goods for sale"). One piece of advice is that it is a plural noun that should never be used singular (e.g. ...
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3answers
2k views

Why do we say “What do you do for a living”?

What does "a" (the indefinite article) imply in this context?
2
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1answer
318 views

Is “I've told you at fewest ten times” grammatical?

After this question was put on hold, I am editing this to clarify that I am not seeking "the most wrong answer," but that I am instead asking for a reason for the continued use of a construction that ...
1
vote
2answers
140 views

Should an article be used for the word “war”?

I’ve been reading much about the US poverty war recently. Some people say: He declared the war on poverty fifty years ago. But others say: He declared war on poverty fifty years ago. ...
0
votes
1answer
111 views

when does the noun “time” become a countable noun?

I am writing an email to my friend and want to use this sentence: "I am having a great time." I would like to know whether the above sentence is correct. Also, I know that time can be an ...
0
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1answer
189 views

Is there a countable form for “literature”?

Literature is an uncountable noun, so we can't say one literature or two literatures. But is there a countable form, as there is for information? One piece of information, for instance.
2
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3answers
96 views

The article of X in “a change of X”

Why can we say "a change of address", "a change of plan", etc. without any articles in front of "address" and "plan"? Aren't they countable nouns? Is it some kind of idiom for "a change of X" or a ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Compound words/noun phrases in english with different number of words in plural/singular form

Are there any cases where the plural and singular form of an English compound word or noun phrase differ in the number of words contained? In all cases I can think of, the actual words within the ...
1
vote
2answers
453 views

Are frozen pizzas countable or uncountable?

As you know pizzas are countable But when you add another word like, frozen, does it remain countable? Generally, when you add an adjective to a countable word are there any changes?
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3answers
6k views

Why is bread uncountable? How do you describe the “three breads” in the picture?

In this picture there are "three breads", but they are not loaves because loaves can be cut into pieces, and they are not slices either because they weren't cut with a knife. So the only way to ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

There is (are) + countable plural nouns [duplicate]

I keep hearing from native speakers the phrases like these: There is a lot of cars (books, hotels) There is a couple of cars (books, hotels) There is five (ten, etc.) of cars (books, hotels) There is ...
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2answers
597 views

“No restriction” vs. “no restrictions”

The data center must be flexible. There should be no restriction/restrictions on user's choice of protocols. What should it be?
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1answer
363 views

Do nonsense and bull**** have corresponding plural forms?

For example, I've heard nonsenses, but I've never heard bullshits. Why one is plural and the other is singular? They mean the same thing.
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1answer
565 views

When saying supplier of a building material should the material be singular or plural?

Which of the following is correct: Supplier of tile, stone, tools and equipment or Supplier of tiles, stones, tools and equipment If you could provide an English rule to know that would also be ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Should we say less or fewer “fruit and vegetables”?

Fruit is uncountable but vegetables is countable, so we should use less or fewer before them together?