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0
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1answer
48 views

Is “fish” starting to be treated as countable?

Recently, I've passed through a phrase "a fish" in several serious contemporary books on international politics. Is "fish" coming to be used as countable?
0
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2answers
59 views

“an alarm” vs “the alarm” [closed]

Which ones correct ? All the guests on the boat got frightened when they heard an alarm. (or) All the guests on the boat got frightened when they heard the alarm. I expect the second sentence to ...
1
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1answer
31 views

“is” or “are” with “fewer”?

Which one is correct? (Or is neither?) This field can contain 30 characters, fewer is recommended. This field can contain 30 characters, fewer are recommended.
3
votes
1answer
96 views

Can 'surgery' be a count noun in the sense of 'medical procedure'?

This is something that has bothered me for a long time. Several years ago a remember noticing in the media a shift from using "An operation" to "A surgery" when talking about someone who was ...
1
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4answers
88 views

Should I say “study materials” or “education materials” or “teaching material?”

I am building a web application where people can upload their study materials about robotics and programming and manage them and share etc. I want to name it well, so at the moment I have: ...
3
votes
3answers
60 views

Society as a countable noun

Macmillan Dictionary gives the following example sentence for the word "society" as a countable noun: "Good writing still has a place in contemporary society." ...
3
votes
3answers
121 views

Is “troop” unique among English words in meaning both a group and an individual member of that kind of group?

The term "troop" can mean a group of soldiers, or it can mean an individual soldier (perhaps in this usage it was originally short for "trooper"). In fact, in modern usage, the plural "troops" almost ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Is it “as many electrons” or “as much electrons”?

I thought it would be "as many electrons", because electrons is a countable noun, but Google shows that "as much electrons" is more popular than "as many electrons"
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3answers
435 views

Too less vs too little [closed]

Consider these two sentences: One week is too little to observe a measurable weight loss. One week is too less to observe a measurable weight loss. When I uttered (2) in casual speech, my ...
0
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2answers
53 views

Usage of the noun 'news'

I would like to ask you a question concerning the noun 'news'. I am aware that as an uncountable noun, it is, thus, not possible to use the indefinite article preceding it. I am a bit unsure, ...
1
vote
2answers
140 views

'Ass' (“fool”): vulgar?

My kid heard the word ass somewhere and asked what it meant. My wife said not to use it as it's not a nice word. (She meant that it's vulgar or obscene.) Later (when the kid wasn't around), I objected ...
0
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4answers
198 views

Countable and uncountable in one word? [closed]

[original question] Do any words words exist that are a countable and an uncountable noun at the same time? Are there any nouns that are both countable and uncountable? Are there any words which ...
1
vote
2answers
558 views

Does “every time” not mean “all the time”?

In this article, Singapore Plans To Become The World's First Smart Nation, there is an explanation about the E3A plan by Leonard: We're working on something that we've named E3A, which is our way ...
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0answers
69 views

one of my “innovations” or “innovation”? [closed]

I'm puzzled by checking the Oxford Dictionaries http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/innovation. If I want to say "introducing one of my innovations", can I use the word "innovation" ...
4
votes
3answers
859 views

“I am looking for soaps” or “I am looking for soap” - which one is better?

I think that if I want to ask for something or discuss something an ”s” is needed at the end of a noun, but I don’t know why a singular noun is not sufficient? Every time I have asked a shop ...
13
votes
5answers
3k views

The Plural of Email - Emails? [duplicate]

I debated with my peers that we can use the word emails when referring to more than one and it would be grammatically right. But most of them said since we don't say we received mails today, ...
0
votes
1answer
99 views

Do you add 's' after countable nouns following numbers other than 1? [duplicate]

For countable nouns you add 's' for non single quantity e.g. 1 hour, 2 hours, -1 degree, -2 degrees What about 0 hour(s)? 0.5 hour(s)? 1.5 hour(s)?
5
votes
1answer
82 views

A code or some code?

When talking about the source code of a program, my Computer Science teacher sometimes refers to single pieces of code as 'a code'. For example: For today's task, you need to write a code which ...
0
votes
2answers
79 views

Is “vector” countable? [closed]

I was wondering if "vector" is countable or not. I've been using it in plural form (vectors) but I don't know if that is correct.
1
vote
1answer
124 views

Using “pizza” as countable vs. uncountable

I ate pizzas on Sundays. I ate pizza on Sundays. Pizza is both uncountable and countable. In these sentences, is there any difference in meaning? Is one of them wrong?
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vote
2answers
138 views

Is 'experience' countable or uncountable? [closed]

"Seeing the Grand Canyon was certainly____(an /some) experience." Is experience countable or uncountable? Should I use some or an?
5
votes
1answer
238 views

Countable ingredient pluralization for English cookbooks

The rule for countable ingredient pluralization appears to be: If more than one countable ingredient is necessary to fill the required amount, then the ingredient is pluralized. For example: 2 ...
1
vote
1answer
104 views

Some + Countable Noun: True Only When Plural?

Assume there are multiple books on a shelf. At least one book is red. At least one book is blue. Sentence in dispute: Some of the books are red. Is this sentence false if only one book is red? ...
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1answer
93 views

“Most of what” and “is” or “are”

I've gotten into an argument about whether "Most of what I've read is books" or "Most of what I've read are books" is correct. I think it should be "is" because "most of" refers to "what I've read" ...
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votes
2answers
95 views

Is numbers countable or uncountable? [closed]

I would like to know if you say: Too much numbers or so many numbers. Is numbers a countable or uncountable noun? and why?
0
votes
1answer
103 views

can we say 'a pain' ? or 'a piece of pain'?

Here what I'm talking about is 'pain' as a noun, describing something that makes you uncomfortable either physically or mentally. As far as I know, it is countable when describing physical hurts. ...
0
votes
2answers
397 views

When does an uncountable noun become countable?

I wonder why "fat" "carbohydrate" and "protein" can have the plural form as in the following quotes. Aren't those nouns uncountable? The Russian consumer protection agency said Friday it is taking ...
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vote
2answers
1k views

Shouldn’t we use “lots of” with plural nouns and “a lot of” with singular ones?

Is it correct to say "there are a lot of aspects" like here (see the first comment) or here? Shouldn't be "lots of" used instead? I was sure that the correct form is "lots of" for the plural form.
3
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2answers
154 views

Question about “criticism” and “critique”

Are criticism and critique mass nouns? If not, what semantic area does their countable usage refer to?
-1
votes
1answer
205 views

Countable vs. Uncountable Nouns [closed]

What is correct: "too much people" or "too many people"?
0
votes
1answer
64 views

The usage of … number(s) of [closed]

Here we wish to make sure the usage of ... number(s) of ..., which one below is correct? An even number of people An even number of cards Even numbers of people Even numbers of cards An odd ...
2
votes
1answer
83 views

“rising sea level” or “rising sea levels”?

I've seen both in newspapers when it comes to the subject of global warming. Confusingly, "rising sea levels" seems to be used more frequently. For me, it's much easier to understand "rising sea ...
1
vote
2answers
153 views

'(death) throes' - countability?

In my Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary the word 'throe' is not listed, only 'throes'. With other nouns, the dictionary clearly indicates whether nouns are countable or uncountable, however, with ...
-1
votes
1answer
169 views

How to say if the word may be countable or uncountable in English?

For example: Maybe the item of travel city include more than one city, But what's the correct writing of Travel City. Should I use Travel City/Cities? Travel Date: 0503, 2014; 0504, 2014 Travel City: ...
5
votes
1answer
386 views

two uncountable nouns with and

If we had two uncountable nouns with and , would we use a singular or plural form? How much flour and butter is/are needed to make a pizza ?
0
votes
2answers
182 views

Conjugation of answer to “How much money is there?” [duplicate]

I'm using a website - www.ixl.com - to teach my child how to count American coins, amongst other activities. The site also has many questions on English grammar. One thing that doesn't seem right - ...
0
votes
1answer
103 views

Numbers / number

By looking at the graph above, should numbers or number be used in this context? Overall, the numbers of international tourists arrived in these five countries had increased over the period ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

One type of good - singular or plural

I've read conflicting advice on the use of the word "goods" in an economic context (e.g. "goods for sale"). One piece of advice is that it is a plural noun that should never be used singular (e.g. ...
1
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3answers
6k views

Why do we say “What do you do for a living”?

What does "a" (the indefinite article) imply in this context?
2
votes
1answer
454 views

Is “I've told you at fewest ten times” grammatical?

After this question was put on hold, I am editing this to clarify that I am not seeking "the most wrong answer," but that I am instead asking for a reason for the continued use of a construction that ...
1
vote
2answers
225 views

Should an article be used for the word “war”?

I’ve been reading much about the US poverty war recently. Some people say: He declared the war on poverty fifty years ago. But others say: He declared war on poverty fifty years ago. ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

when does the noun “time” become a countable noun?

I am writing an email to my friend and want to use this sentence: "I am having a great time." I would like to know whether the above sentence is correct. Also, I know that time can be an ...
0
votes
1answer
495 views

Is there a countable form for “literature”?

Literature is an uncountable noun, so we can't say one literature or two literatures. But is there a countable form, as there is for information? One piece of information, for instance.
2
votes
3answers
137 views

The article of X in “a change of X”

Why can we say "a change of address", "a change of plan", etc. without any articles in front of "address" and "plan"? Aren't they countable nouns? Is it some kind of idiom for "a change of X" or a ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Compound words/noun phrases in english with different number of words in plural/singular form

Are there any cases where the plural and singular form of an English compound word or noun phrase differ in the number of words contained? In all cases I can think of, the actual words within the ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Are frozen pizzas countable or uncountable?

As you know pizzas are countable But when you add another word like, frozen, does it remain countable? Generally, when you add an adjective to a countable word are there any changes?
5
votes
4answers
14k views

Why is bread uncountable? How do you describe the “three breads” in the picture?

In this picture there are "three breads", but they are not loaves because loaves can be cut into pieces, and they are not slices either because they weren't cut with a knife. So the only way to ...
2
votes
1answer
4k views

There is (are) + countable plural nouns [duplicate]

I keep hearing from native speakers the phrases like these: There is a lot of cars (books, hotels) There is a couple of cars (books, hotels) There is five (ten, etc.) of cars (books, hotels) There is ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

“No restriction” vs. “no restrictions”

The data center must be flexible. There should be no restriction/restrictions on user's choice of protocols. What should it be?
-3
votes
1answer
635 views

Do nonsense and bull**** have corresponding plural forms?

For example, I've heard nonsenses, but I've never heard bullshits. Why one is plural and the other is singular? They mean the same thing.