The tag has no usage guidance.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

2
votes
0answers
27 views

Can we use singular or plural nouns with names of countries? [duplicate]

When asked a question about Collective Nouns, I told them that it is all right to use a singular or plural verb after a Collective Noun, as in - The class was listening to the lecture with rapt ...
22
votes
1answer
573 views

British Mass Nouns versus American Count Nouns

British English often employs mass nouns where American English would only employ count nouns. Count nouns are nouns which take pluralization and numerical quantifiers like 'many'. Mass nouns can't be ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

Is there a word that refers to discrete pieces of visual content that could be either still or moving images?

I've searched for this here and elsewhere but not been able to find it. I'm looking for a word that refers to discrete pieces of visual content that could be either still or moving images. That is, ...
0
votes
2answers
77 views

“Every garment” or “every piece of garment”

The dictionary definition of garment is an item of clothing Should I write every garment or every piece of garment? The second one sounds more correct to me, but it's wordier. Is the first one ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

Using “some” to describe units of time

"some minutes, some years, some seconds" are grammatically incorrect. But "a few minutes, a few years, a few seconds" works. I'm trying to teach a non-native speaker this nuance but "it just sounds ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

Countable noun for a coin or a banknote

I am looking for a countable noun which can stand for either a coin or a banknote. Currency and money are the only two words I can think of, but not being countable they don't fit what I'm looking for,...
3
votes
6answers
198 views

Why is “collect a coin” ungrammatical?

I'm on the topic of countability and an example in my book says that "collect a coin" is ungrammatical, and that you say "collect coins" instead. But why? Is it because "collecting" is not appropriate ...
2
votes
1answer
124 views

When can uncountable nouns be countable?

I have a question about uncountable nouns that are used as countable in certain situations. When it comes to some uncountable nouns such as fruit, cake, coffee etc., I have found out that they can ...
1
vote
2answers
98 views

“Frequent absence” versus “frequent absences”

One of my English tests required me to complete the gaps with words formed from the words in capital letters. It is a love story about a man with a disorder that causes him to time travel ...
1
vote
1answer
113 views

much natural or more natural?

so I've heard the expression "it sounds more natural" in many English podcasts but as everyone knows "natural" is an uncountable adjective, therefore "much" should be preceded before the adjective. I ...
1
vote
1answer
135 views

Why are some nouns countable and others uncountable? [duplicate]

I'm having trouble articulating what it is I'm looking for, so I'll start with an example. Candy is delicious. Candies are delicious. Vegetables are delicious. Fruit is delicious. ...
0
votes
0answers
53 views

Are data structures countable or uncountable nouns?

For example what would be the correct answers to this article quiz? Why is nil/a/the priority queue implemented with nil/a/the heap ordered binary tree faster than nil/a/the sorted array ...
0
votes
2answers
161 views

Is 'storage' countable or uncountable if it means warehouse or repository?

I need to write an article and I have to use this word in the context. I cannot replace the word with a different word (warehouse, repository, etc.). I checked this word via http://dictionary....
3
votes
1answer
367 views

Abstract nouns: countable and uncountable

What is the element that causes many abstract nouns to be both countable and uncountable (not with different meanings)? To illustrate the point, a word like taste as a noun when it means "the ...
1
vote
4answers
394 views

“Two pairs of trousers” vs. “two trousers”

I have read the following sentence in an exercise book written by a non-native speaker: Wilson has bought two trousers. I know that it is very common to say "Wilson has bought two pairs of ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

Should “repetition” be singular or plural?

We all know what repetition is. I'm trying to construct the following sentence: He called out her name in an earnest, helpless repetition. or should it be He called out her name in earnest, ...
4
votes
1answer
348 views

Is it correct to use infrastructure as a countable noun in this context?

My understanding of the word "infrastructure" is that it is uncountable. However, upon looking it up in Oxford Learner's Dictionary, I found that it is classified as "countable, uncountable." http://...
5
votes
4answers
8k views

So, “Some advice” or “some advices”? Which is correct?

"Some advice" or "some advices" as in "I got some advice / advices for you"? So, Which is correct? In Oxford Learner's Dictionaries, "advice" is uncountable noun, so "Some advice" is the correct one....
8
votes
2answers
2k views

Why do we use the article 'a' when referring to 100 items? But we don't use it when referring to any other plural count?

Edit Note: This question has been linked to these questions about using an article before adjectives modifying numbers. This question here has nothing to do with adjectives at all: Indefinite ...
0
votes
1answer
83 views

Can we use singular countable nouns after “any”? [duplicate]

Which one is correct ? 1.A. There isn't any student in the class. 1.B. There aren't any students in the class. how is that in questions? 2.A. Is there any student in the class? 2.B. Are there any ...
1
vote
2answers
116 views

Possible “rule” for uncountable nouns

In looking at many of the answers to ESL learner's questions about countable and uncountable nouns it seems that answers usually take the form "Uncountables can be become countables. There's no rule ...
0
votes
1answer
65 views

“a bewildering amount of choice” or “a bewildering amount of choices”?

"a bewildering amount of choice" is a sentence from a dictionary. I think it should be ""a bewildering amount of choices" and I found both of them can be found from the Internet. Anyone can help to ...
0
votes
1answer
162 views

Use of “age” as an uncountable & countable noun

Why is it that the "age" is used as an uncountable noun in some cases and as a countable noun in other circumstances? Examples: Now the market is not booming, and the employers are switching ...
0
votes
2answers
101 views

Would “mould” and “mud” be considered substances made up of parts?

Ignoring the difference in spelling between "mould" and "mold" for the moment, I need to categorise the following terms into "masses of substances" or "masses of substances made up of parts too ...
2
votes
2answers
128 views

Discrete units of continuous quantity

Is it proper to speak of units of a continuous quantity as if they are discrete or continuous? For example, I never know whether I should say that some food has "less calories" than another food (...
1
vote
0answers
81 views

“an entertainment”

I'm reading Neil Postman's Amusing Ourselves to Death and I came across an interesting usage of the word entertainment. "The first is that on television, religion, like everything else, is ...
1
vote
2answers
165 views

Is the noun “faculty” countable?

I know that the noun faculty can be both singular and plural, but I’m confused whether it’s countable or uncountable when used in sentences like this one: Many international faculty have ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

'pizza' and 'cake': uncountable? [closed]

Countable noun and Uncountable noun are really hard to understand. I read "'a cake' is correct, but 'a pizza' isn't correct." Why is 'pizza' uncountable?
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Why is liquid a countable noun?

I read this sentence in a description to a podcast from https://www.eslpod.com/website/index_new.html Batter, “batter,” when we talk about cooking is a liquid, made usually with eggs, and flower,...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Is “fish” starting to be treated as countable? [closed]

Recently, I've passed through a phrase "a fish" in several serious contemporary books on international politics. Is "fish" coming to be used as countable?
0
votes
2answers
267 views

“an alarm” vs “the alarm” [closed]

Which ones correct ? All the guests on the boat got frightened when they heard an alarm. (or) All the guests on the boat got frightened when they heard the alarm. I expect the second sentence to ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

“is” or “are” with “fewer”?

Which one is correct? (Or is neither?) This field can contain 30 characters, fewer is recommended. This field can contain 30 characters, fewer are recommended.
3
votes
1answer
269 views

Can 'surgery' be a count noun in the sense of 'medical procedure'?

This is something that has bothered me for a long time. Several years ago a remember noticing in the media a shift from using "An operation" to "A surgery" when talking about someone who was ...
1
vote
3answers
841 views

Should I say “study materials” or “education materials” or “teaching material?”

I am building a web application where people can upload their study materials about robotics and programming and manage them and share etc. I want to name it well, so at the moment I have: ...
3
votes
3answers
171 views

Society as a countable noun

Macmillan Dictionary gives the following example sentence for the word "society" as a countable noun: "Good writing still has a place in contemporary society." (http://www.macmillandictionary.com/...
3
votes
3answers
241 views

Is “troop” unique among English words in meaning both a group and an individual member of that kind of group?

The term "troop" can mean a group of soldiers, or it can mean an individual soldier (perhaps in this usage it was originally short for "trooper"). In fact, in modern usage, the plural "troops" almost ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Is it “as many electrons” or “as much electrons”?

I thought it would be "as many electrons", because electrons is a countable noun, but Google shows that "as much electrons" is more popular than "as many electrons"
0
votes
3answers
4k views

Too less vs too little [closed]

Consider these two sentences: One week is too little to observe a measurable weight loss. One week is too less to observe a measurable weight loss. When I uttered (2) in casual speech, my ...
0
votes
2answers
66 views

Usage of the noun 'news'

I would like to ask you a question concerning the noun 'news'. I am aware that as an uncountable noun, it is, thus, not possible to use the indefinite article preceding it. I am a bit unsure, however,...
1
vote
2answers
289 views

'Ass' (“fool”): vulgar?

My kid heard the word ass somewhere and asked what it meant. My wife said not to use it as it's not a nice word. (She meant that it's vulgar or obscene.) Later (when the kid wasn't around), I objected ...
0
votes
4answers
391 views

Countable and uncountable in one word? [closed]

[original question] Do any words words exist that are a countable and an uncountable noun at the same time? Are there any nouns that are both countable and uncountable? Are there any words which ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Does “every time” not mean “all the time”?

In this article, Singapore Plans To Become The World's First Smart Nation, there is an explanation about the E3A plan by Leonard: We're working on something that we've named E3A, which is our way ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

“I am looking for soaps” or “I am looking for soap” - which one is better?

I think that if I want to ask for something or discuss something an ”s” is needed at the end of a noun, but I don’t know why a singular noun is not sufficient? Every time I have asked a shop employee,...
13
votes
5answers
8k views

The Plural of Email - Emails? [duplicate]

I debated with my peers that we can use the word emails when referring to more than one and it would be grammatically right. But most of them said since we don't say we received mails today, ...
0
votes
1answer
262 views

Do you add 's' after countable nouns following numbers other than 1? [duplicate]

For countable nouns you add 's' for non single quantity e.g. 1 hour, 2 hours, -1 degree, -2 degrees What about 0 hour(s)? 0.5 hour(s)? 1.5 hour(s)?
5
votes
1answer
127 views

A code or some code?

When talking about the source code of a program, my Computer Science teacher sometimes refers to single pieces of code as 'a code'. For example: For today's task, you need to write a code which ...
0
votes
2answers
124 views

Is “vector” countable? [closed]

I was wondering if "vector" is countable or not. I've been using it in plural form (vectors) but I don't know if that is correct.
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Using “pizza” as countable vs. uncountable

I ate pizzas on Sundays. I ate pizza on Sundays. Pizza is both uncountable and countable. In these sentences, is there any difference in meaning? Is one of them wrong?
1
vote
2answers
284 views

Is 'experience' countable or uncountable? [closed]

"Seeing the Grand Canyon was certainly____(an /some) experience." Is experience countable or uncountable? Should I use some or an?
6
votes
1answer
288 views

Countable ingredient pluralization for English cookbooks

The rule for countable ingredient pluralization appears to be: If more than one countable ingredient is necessary to fill the required amount, then the ingredient is pluralized. For example: 2 ...