For questions related to conversation or speech

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1
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3answers
86 views

How to reply properly to 'Thank you' [closed]

Consider following situation You are a polite person and you hold a door open for someone that comes immediately after you. He/she says: "Thank You!" What is the correct expression to reply to ...
5
votes
3answers
21k views

What does “there, there” actually mean?

It came from an episode of Big Bang Theory; when Penny gets hurt, and asks Sheldon to be more comforting, he starts the conversation with "there, there." What does that mean?
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2answers
44 views

Adjective for a type of conversation where no real information is conveyed but rather the speakers are establishing a connection.

There is an english word (adj) that refers to a type of conversation where no real real information is being conveyed but rather the speakers are establishing a connection. A casual conversation ...
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2answers
102 views

Are there any rules for missing words in English questions or affirmative statements?

In some sentences we don't use some words: For example: Instead of: "Do you want a ride?" We say: "Want a ride?" Instead of: "I'm just coming. Hang on!" We say: "Just coming. Hang ...
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2answers
4k views

What does “those are the breaks” mean?

I remarked to a friend, "It's too bad I have to wake up early," and he responded "those are the breaks." What does this mean? Isn't it a bad thing to wake up late, which would be the opposite of a ...
0
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1answer
30 views

punctuation to indicate non-grammatical pause or omission

Is it inappropriate to use an ellipsis to create a conversational pause in a typed sentence, in a situation where it's not appropriate to use a comma or a dash or anything else? There's no grammatical ...
0
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1answer
533 views

Chat to vs. Chat with

I work in an office and lots of my co-workers use the phrase "chat to", as in could I chat to him about the project? I would say the same thing like this: could I chat with him about this project? ...
0
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1answer
33 views

running into someone after vacation

for the question 16, I don't know either using "How was your break?" or "What's going on". And Q20,"what about you?" and "what are you up to?" seem able to use? Could someone explain their usages?
6
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4answers
1k views

Garbage/stuff words

I've watched two interviews. One with Grace Park, one with Eliza Dushku. What one can't miss is that Eliza uses an awful lot of garbage words (or what these are called) — um, so, like, you know, ...
6
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4answers
2k views

Is addressing a guy as “guy” rude?

Non-native here, is addressing a guy as just "guy" considered rude? Like, while addressing a pet-store clerk: "Hey, guy, how many mice will $13 buy?" Also, how long has it been in use?
4
votes
4answers
204 views

Is there a word for this type of overhearing?

just those snippets of conversations that you're not involved in that you overhear and its not even louder than the rest of their conversation it just stands out to you. I feel like that deserves an ...
1
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1answer
14k views

past/present tense when telling a story in spoken English

I've noticed that, in daily conversations, when people are telling stories in the past, they often shift the tense back and forth between the past and the present - even they're native speakers. For ...
1
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1answer
83 views

“I know you are” as a response to introduction [closed]

I was watching a movie and noticed this sentence used as a response from a person introducing himself/herself. This is quite odd for me as a non-native speaker of the language. Example: Setting: In ...
1
vote
3answers
148 views

Is there a word for talking without moving your mouth?

I don't mean Ventriloquism exactly, I mean talking around what you may already have in your mouth... For instance say you put something gross in your mouth and ask if its okay to spit it out. ...
1
vote
1answer
107 views

How to answer the greeting “What's the story?”

I have a lot of Irish coworkers that often greet me by saying "What's the story?" What's a good way to answer to this greeting? Also, does this ever get used in the UK, US or Australia?
0
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1answer
3k views

Is “I Hope All goes well” Appropriate here?

Is the response for this dialog appropriate or even correct with "I hope all goes well with your project"? (the conversation happened through text message, so I believe it wasn't very formal) ...
6
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2answers
110 views

What is the proper response to “Excuse my language”?

What is the proper response to "Excuse my language"? I don't want to say "not a problem", because honestly, it is a problem. However, I can't think of any other appropriate response. I'm looking ...
1
vote
3answers
777 views

Finding out the proper word out of book-learned vocabulary

I've been learning English for many years now by using many resources available to me. It is mostly reading, as I have very few opportunities to use English to communicate. Due to this fact, my ...
8
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3answers
1k views

Is Wayne's World's (NOT) a modern invention?

Older users of this site may recall the 'Bill & Ted' 'Wayne's World' series of movies of the early 1990s. They were mindless but fairly amusing and their eponymous characters spoke in a unique ...
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votes
2answers
94 views

“it's my stag do, so I won't” [closed]

Mr. A Hi I think I shall need more time to create the reports, so will not be sending you today. I will get this finalised by discussing with Mr.Z although later. Mr. B OK, no problem. Please refer ...
9
votes
7answers
95k views

Appropriate replacement of “nice to meet you” for online salutation?

I would like to use “nice to meet you” in an online email exchange but I feel that meet and see are not appropriate for online use. There is also a question about it. I have also read somewhere that ...
15
votes
2answers
93k views

Is “nice to meet you” an appropriate online salutation?

When one makes a new acquaintance with somebody in person, you may say “it was nice to meet you”, e.g. when you leave. What if you make a new acquaintance over the internet, what do you say when you ...
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6answers
1k views

How common is “What happened?” when asking people to repeat what they said? How long has this been in common usage?

For several years, I have heard most young people and some adults use the phrase What happened? when they do not hear what is spoken. It appears to be used where previously several other phrases were ...
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votes
3answers
69 views

a word where character reply in single sentence which increase the intensity of the conversation [closed]

Soliloquy and monologue I know of these but I can't seem to remember this word which frustate me …
1
vote
1answer
3k views

“Yes, Please” vs “Yes, Of course”

I have heard people saying: Que: Can I use your pen? Ans: Yes please. and also Que: Can I use your pen? Ans: Yes Of course. I wanted to know if there is any difference between these two ...
2
votes
1answer
102 views

Good night for greeting [duplicate]

Is it appropriate to use Good night for saying hello? I've heard that a person in a movie said good night for greeting, is it OK?
79
votes
13answers
46k views

Which is correct: “could care less” or “couldn't care less”?

What's the deal with the phrase "could care less"? Whilst growing up, I've always known people (parents etc) to use the phrase "couldn't care less", but I've also come across people who use the ...
1
vote
4answers
325 views

Opening-conversation for requesting a service over the phone

As a non English speaker with a non English name, I find myself opening quite a long question before I even get a confirmation about the fact that, the person in the other side can even help me in ...
0
votes
2answers
174 views

How to use the sound “ei” or “ey” in English conversation, which is quite popular in Australia?

I lived in Australia for 13 years and many times when speaking to local Aussie people, I often hear they use "ei" or "ey" (I do not know how to write that word, and that is why I am asking you) like ...
0
votes
1answer
458 views

Sorry to hear that [closed]

How should I reply when someone says: Sorry to hear that The situation may be Feeling sick Someone close to you deceased Talking about an accident Talking about someone's sittuation etc.
3
votes
2answers
953 views

Ask someone about their birth order [duplicate]

If I need to ask someone about their birth order, what question is usually used? Let's say I do not ask how many children his family has first. What is your birth order? or Which child are you in ...
0
votes
1answer
277 views

Mentioning someone's name in 1-to-1 conversation

When only two interlocutors are communicating in a face-to-face or equivalent setup without the need to get the other's attention, there is no necessity to mention the other person's name. Yet ...
5
votes
3answers
319 views

A word to describe responses such as “I see” and “Okay”

While conversing, I sometimes find myself, after listening to what my partner has to say, responding with phrases such as "I see" and "Okay" to indicate that I haven't lost interest but I either don't ...
6
votes
1answer
248 views

In a conversation, do native speakers people call each other by name? [closed]

I've noticed a particular behavior in the frequency of mentioning the person's name we're talking with. I'm Italian, in my language we are used to calling each other by our first names during a ...
0
votes
0answers
84 views

Question about phone conversation

What should I say on the phone? Is it, Where are you calling from? or From where are you calling? If there is any alternative, please do share.Thanks
1
vote
1answer
118 views

When “you” is being used as a dummy subject

I observe very often that in conversations, native speakers say "you" as a dummy subject (not sure if that's a correct way to call it), not particularly meaning the person whom the speaker is talking ...
9
votes
5answers
1k views

Is there a word for “umming”?

Is there a word for saying "um" or "uh", etc, during speaking? Or a word for "um" and "uh", etc?
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votes
4answers
160 views

Word or phrase for people butting in and taking a side in an online conversation?

The phenomenon is not dissimilar to this: Word for "butting in on the Net", yet it wouldn't necessarily be considered trolling. Person A replies to a comment/post by Person B on the ...
0
votes
3answers
695 views

Is “aha” an appropriate answer to “thank you”?

I have heard many native speakers in the United states answer with a brief and cold "aha" when someone says "thank you". Is it really appropriate to answer like that? I myself feel offended when I ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

Is “Where do you sit?” correct for asking someone where their workspace is?

At work, if I had to ask someone where exactly they worked, as in where their workspace/cubicle is, what should I say? Is "where do you sit?" the usual thing to say? I'm from India and hear this ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

How to say “Go ahead, I will follow you later” in other ways?

My friends are going out for lunch and ask me to go with them. I haven't finished my work. I will follow them 10 minutes later. Normally, what will you say? beside "I will follow you later."
2
votes
0answers
758 views

I need help with english grammar/conversation? [closed]

I'm a pretty good user of the English language, I can read, write, and converse rather well in english. But I'm not very good with grammar, consequently I began searching for resources on the subject. ...
-1
votes
2answers
137 views

What are the uses of the modal verb “would”? [closed]

Besides the future-in-past sense in conditional sentences, what other alternative uses can the word would have in conversation?
12
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2answers
7k views

When is it OK to use OK?

I often use "OK" in business and personal emails and phone conversations. But I often feel uncertain if it is appropriate to use it in every type of context. Please tell how universally I can use ...
1
vote
1answer
349 views

Polite Answers to “What else can I do for you? ” [closed]

Suppose that I call a company's call center for help. And near the end of the conversation, the staff asks a question like "what else can I do for you ?". How can I give a polite answer to this sort ...
13
votes
9answers
65k views

How often do people say “gotta”, “wanna” or “gonna” in English speaking countries?

I learned these three words from Collins Cobuild Advanced Learner's English Dictionary. got|ta /g'ɒtə/ Gotta is used in written English to represent the words 'got to' when they are ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

Is such usage of negation acceptable in everyday conversation? [duplicate]

Let's begin with a sentence such as: We can't do this any more. This is the most standard form and grammatically perfect. But I have also seen or heard many times in some informal occasions ...
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4answers
234 views

Middle ground between “I'll live with it” and “Bring it on!”?

The context is a typical conversation. You've settled for a course of action and expressed yourself accordingly. Then you get from someone a warning of sorts about potential risks or consequences ...
23
votes
7answers
6k views

How do native speakers answer questions like “what's cooking”?

I work in an office environment as a software developer in Massachusetts, USA and every so often have some colleague ask me a question like "what's cooking? anything good?" When they say that they ...
5
votes
1answer
12k views

How appropriate is to use 'Nice to e-meet you'

I work in a software organization so email conversations are frequent. Recently one client e-mailed me with "Nice to e-meet you". I want to know how appropriate is it to use 'Nice to e-meet you'. Is ...