For questions related to conversation or speech

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1
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2answers
46 views

Word or phrase for “online supporting documents”

In a conversation on a particular topic, I want to ask the other person to provide online supporting documents about his views on the topic. They may be websites or blogs or wiki etc, but they should ...
1
vote
2answers
75 views

so mainstream or too mainstream [closed]

Should I say "something is so mainstream" or "too mainstream". They are both grammatically correct but which one is more common to use?
4
votes
3answers
157 views

Is addressing a guy as “guy” rude?

Non-native here, is addressing a guy as just "guy" considered rude? Like, while addressing a pet-store clerk: "Hey, guy, how many mice will $13 buy?" Also, how long has it been in use?
1
vote
1answer
67 views

What does this person say in this video?

I don't know if this is allowed but I want to know what this Gwyneth Paltrow say in this video at 0:51 to be exact. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZORey6EHF3g or ...
5
votes
2answers
83 views

Dramatic hijacking of a sentence

A common trope in movies. What's it called? Person A: The President was a brilliant man! A truly one-of-a-kind-- Person B: killer, who used his ruthless abandon to get ahead!
1
vote
2answers
342 views

What does “those are the breaks” mean?

I remarked to a friend, "It's too bad I have to wake up early," and he responded "those are the breaks." What does this mean? Isn't it a bad thing to wake up late, which would be the opposite of a ...
8
votes
8answers
2k views

Word/phrase/idiom to describe avoiding answering a question by stating the question doesn't need to be asked

I run into this situation often in the office. I have a specific question to ask somebody and have chosen the person to ask it, but that person doesn't know the answer. Instead of answering the ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

greeting at nighttime [duplicate]

First: Can I say "Good evening" at the beginning of a conversation at 10 pm or 11 pm? or Good night would be more appropriate? Second: what to say when you meet someone at 1 am? Third:Does the answer ...
0
votes
4answers
1k views

What is the expected response to someone saying “Happy Vacations” to you? [closed]

Someone has messaged me: Happy vacations. Are the following replies correct? Now it would be good. Same to you too! Or should it be Same to you too! Now it would be good. I want it to sound ...
0
votes
1answer
105 views

What is the meaning of where is it gone/going? [closed]

I was sitting next to a guy. He dropped something on the ground by accident. Then he said to himslef "where is it gone/going?" or at least that was what I heard. Does this sentence ,if I got it ...
0
votes
1answer
112 views

How to Make Up Comebacks when Somebody Calls You?

I heard when I called somebody they answered "You" or "Yo" . . Which one is correct? and what does it mean?
1
vote
2answers
304 views

How can I improve my comprehension of rapid dialogue? [duplicate]

I have difficulty understanding dialogue in movies when the characters speak fast. For example, I was watching The Lord of the Rings and became frustrated with my listening comprehension. I could not ...
2
votes
1answer
253 views

“Do you like my present” vs. “do you like your present”

When my daughter received the present I bought to her, I asked her: Do you like my present? Is this correct? Or I should say: Do you like your present?
0
votes
1answer
59 views

“Is too” instead of “it is”

The following is a dialogue of an animated movie (A bug's life), I don't understand why one of them says "Is too" instead of saying "it is". Is a this a natural way of responding and insisting on what ...
0
votes
1answer
247 views

I need live conversation [closed]

Where (what Internet site) can I get a good, continuous conversation in real time from? I need some sort of resource where I have the possibility of just sitting there listening to the conversations ...
1
vote
1answer
6k views

past/present tense when telling a story in spoken English

I've noticed that, in daily conversations, when people are telling stories in the past, they often shift the tense back and forth between the past and the present - even they're native speakers. For ...
0
votes
2answers
73 views

When writing out a phone conversation can you use multiple capitals in a row? [closed]

When writing out a phone conversation for the purpose of transcription or translation, is it correct to write: 1) Hey, Hi, Well... OR 2) Hey, hi, well... I personally think 2, but others ...
1
vote
1answer
349 views

Introducing yourself to someone you have never met [closed]

Today, my manager introduced me to an employee who's visiting us from a different geographical location. The person is visiting our office for 2 weeks. I don't know anything about him and I don't have ...
1
vote
3answers
142 views

meaning of two , four and eight in this conversation

I was watching How I Met Your Mother when I heard a conversation between some actors and it just bounced over me. But from the background I could hear people laughing and I was sitting static without ...
-1
votes
1answer
552 views

Correct use of either in a conversation

In the following conversation: Person A: I don't like Bob Person B: No, he's annoying. Mind you I don't like Barry, either. It is my understanding that the use of the word "either" is appropriate. ...
2
votes
3answers
693 views

The most natural way of asking for telephone call redirection [closed]

What is the most natural way to ask a hotel receptionist or a secretary to transfer your call to a hotel room or an office? Could you please connect me with room number 321? Could you please ...
1
vote
3answers
376 views

Answering the phone outside work

When I was learning English at school, I was taught that one ought to answer the phone saying "X speaking". In films however, I sometimes see people answering any phone with a simple 'hello' and, in ...
38
votes
11answers
6k views

Is the usage of 'personally' in 'I personally don't like something' redundant?

What is the difference between the following? I personally don't like wax museums. I don't like wax museums. The adverb personally does not seem to emphasize anything here. Is it ...
0
votes
1answer
143 views

'I need you!' 'So do I' Is this grammatical?

Evelyn: I need you! Sam: So do I! Is this grammatical? What is the meaning of the response?
0
votes
2answers
1k views

what does “off-the-shelf” mean? [closed]

I am applying for a job and in my proposal my mentor commented the following. Please explain me what it means. ME: Finally I found something promising. Please have a look Mentor: That's a good find ...
4
votes
2answers
188 views

Term for asking a question to create context

Sometimes to start a conversation or to bring up a subject I ask a question. I ask it in hopes that they know the answer, I'm not seeking knowledge or an explanation, but instead I'm looking to create ...
16
votes
4answers
2k views

Greeting: “Cold enough for you?”

This morning at −32°C/−26°F whilst collecting firewood outside my house, I called to my neighbour (brushing snow off his idling truck): "Cold enough for you?" To which he replied with a nod. Later ...
3
votes
0answers
493 views

What's the best resource for improving everyday speaking? [closed]

I'm having a job interview in a month. My writing, reading and listening are good. However, I have weak conversation skills. I need an efficient resource to improve my speaking. Any resource is ...
5
votes
3answers
552 views

Ironic phrase like Russian’s “no, didn’t hear”

Here’s a bit of dialogue which I literally translated from Russian: ― You should get a girlfriend! ― Girlfriend? Didn’t hear. . . . The idea of the answer is to self-ironically point out ...
3
votes
6answers
27k views

Appropriate replacement of “nice to meet you” for online salutation?

I would like to use "nice to meet you" in an online email exchange but I feel that "meet" and "see" are not appropriate for online use. There is also a question about it. I have also read somewhere ...
0
votes
1answer
584 views

When spelling something phonetically, how do you convey letter case? [closed]

Say you need to read someone their password over the phone and you spell it phonetically so that there is no confusion between M and N etc. Now that is straight forward but what if the password is ...
0
votes
3answers
12k views

How to use “you are so lame!” or “you are so retard!” with friends? [closed]

I heard lots of these words from my colleagues. Definitions in Dictionary do not help me much. What I really want to know is what these words actually mean when using with friends and what situation ...
0
votes
0answers
52 views

How to reply on telephone conversation [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to answer to 'Is this John?' on phone? When I get a call from some sales agents/shops and they ask, 'Am I speaking with Akpa?' should I just say 'Yes,' or ...
-1
votes
2answers
442 views

Meaning of “I am not for you to look into all issues” [closed]

A question asked by a team member to a party outside team.. In response to that.... Manager: (Addressing me) This is the area where we need to be self sufficient. Please think about this, how to ...
0
votes
3answers
3k views

“Is this understanding correct?” anything more polite than this?

Do we have a more polite way to say “Is this understanding correct?”. I often find it a little tough question to ask to clients. Anything that sounds more polite and means the same? And also, is the ...
1
vote
0answers
478 views

What is the appropriate response to compliments [closed]

Consider a circumstance when someone compliments during a conversation saying something like 'Your voice is so lovely'. I usually end up smiling and pushing it away. What can be the actual response ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

How to say “Go ahead, I will follow you later” in other ways?

My friends are going out for lunch and ask me to go with them. I haven't finished my work. I will follow them 10 minutes later. Normally, what will you say? beside "I will follow you later."
4
votes
2answers
942 views

What word describes our habit to use extremes in language, and what are its implications?

I have heard that in America, and likely elsewhere as well, we are beginning to be more gratuitous with our use of extreme words when not entirely accurate, such as the words "awesome", "always", ...
1
vote
2answers
956 views

“Don't know what the name is” vs. “Don't know what it's called”

What is the difference between saying: A: Which meal do you want, Sir? B: Number 4. I don't know what the name is. A: Which meal do you want, Sir? B: Number 4. I don't know what it's ...
0
votes
1answer
125 views

Which expression isn't an old way of speaking: Fell to, Fell on, Fell onto, or Dropped to [closed]

My linguistic teacher told me I am speaking like the people who lived hundreds of years ago, when I told him, "The paper fall to the ground when I pass it by," this afternoon. Please tell me which ...
10
votes
8answers
18k views

How often do people say “gotta”, “wanna” or “gonna” in English speaking countries?

I learned these three words from Collins Cobuild Advanced Learner's English Dictionary. got|ta /g'ɒtə/ Gotta is used in written English to represent the words 'got to' when they are ...
2
votes
1answer
69 views

Can “And so?” serve as a request for completion or continuation of the thought?

Can "Yes. And so?" serve as a request for completion or continuation of the thought? For example: Merry: Jack, you can speak Japanese, French, Korean and Arabic. Jack: Yes. And so?
2
votes
5answers
2k views

“How are you” in America

People in America ask "how are you" a lot. Many people would reply with "I'm good." If I am feeling OK, I would say "I'm well." Which version is right?
0
votes
3answers
868 views

British Railway Stations - How do Brits read railway time tables? [closed]

This question is related to two others referring to "how to speak out loud 24-hour clock times". It has been asked how do English-speaking countries that officially use the 24-hour clock system refer ...
1
vote
5answers
592 views

How common is “What happened?” when asking people to repeat what they said? How long has this been in common usage?

For several years, I have heard most young people and some adults use the phrase What happened? when they do not hear what is spoken. It appears to be used where previously several other phrases were ...
4
votes
2answers
11k views

What does “there, there” actually mean?

It came from an episode of Big Bang Theory; when Penny gets hurt, and asks Sheldon to be more comforting, he starts the conversation with "there, there." What does that mean?
3
votes
3answers
22k views

“It was great seeing you.” “You too.” Why not “Me too”?

In response to "It was great seeing you," why do people say "you, too" instead of "me, too?"
4
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the origin of 'be my guest' idiom?

I was surprised when I found out the meaning of a dialog like this: - May I do something? - Be my guest. As for me, it looks really weird. Why 'be my guest' has the meaning 'do it, I don't mind'? ...
1
vote
2answers
131 views

Addressing a person with “man”

Is there any issue to address or call a person (a gentleman, of course) with man? I think the word man has a strange meaning. Which is the best way to address? Is hello enough?
15
votes
5answers
6k views

How should I address a professor in the US?

I am always puzzled about how students address a professor in America. Perhaps "Professor + Last name" is the most formal way to do. Here are my questions: What if the last name of a professor is ...