A contraction is a shortened version of the written and spoken forms of a word, syllable, or word group, created by omission of internal letters.

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“There is no rule” vs. “there isn't rule”

What are the differences between the two sentences below: There is no rule. There isn't rule.
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0answers
35 views

How to overcome confusion of contrasting word 2?

Actual sentence: Another surprising finding was the lack of any neurotic traits in the bonobos, even though these are widely found in other ape species. In this sentence, two contrasting ...
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2answers
20 views

How to overcome confusion of contrasting word?

Actual sentence- As a result, while patients are not being cured, the malaria parasite continues to spread further. My Explanation- This sentence seems to me wrong, because while is contrasting word,...
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1answer
16 views

How to comprehend a sentence with multiple contrasting word and commas?

Darwin’s influence on modern scientific inquiry is largely ......; yet while Darwin’s ideas inform fields as disparate as genetics and social psychology, one cannot help but think that each group, in ....
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1answer
1k views

Why does the word “never” not contain an apostrophe? [closed]

If never is a contraction of 'not ever' why does it not have an apostrophe, i.e. why is it not written n'ever rather than never? I can understand that the apostrophe has simply fallen out of use, but ...
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1answer
69 views

“My name is” or “My name's” [closed]

Can you contract the verb to be in this case? "My name's", "his name's", "her name's".... sound a little bit off to me, or at least sounds very, very informal. Most important question is "is it ...
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2answers
176 views

When does `isn't …` expand to “is … not” and “is not …” [duplicate]

Recently I have been writing a chatbot, and in part of the process it expands contractions. While doing this, I have found odd behavior for the contraction "isn't". There are two different way to ...
12
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2answers
3k views

Isn't a “gonner” or “gonna” slang for a person about to die?

(I think this "blank" moment of mine is what is called in AmEng a brain fart, so be it) Isn't ‘a gonner/gonna’ slang for a person who is about to die? It's said in situations where, potentially, ...
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0answers
21 views

Are there such forms as this's and which's?

I've seen that's, who's, how's, etc., but I don't recall ever seeing this's and which's. Are they used very often or at all? If so, how do you pronounce them? Any differently from this is and which is?...
6
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4answers
9k views

What does “ain't” mean? [closed]

What does the contraction ain't mean? Is it appropriate to use it in formal settings?
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2answers
47 views

When to use opening or closing single quotes

I've been discussing with a colleague which apostrophe/single quote to actually use in what situations. We've agreed to use the closing single quote ( ’ ) for possession. e.g. That’s his ...
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1answer
66 views

Is the sentence “I wonder where he's?” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

The sentence "I wonder where he is?" has no contraction and, in my opinion, feels like it naturally flows compared to using the contraction. Are there any rules that are violated with the contracted ...
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1answer
24k views

Is “mine's” a valid contraction?

Not mines, but mine's (mine is). As in, "You cooked a good turkey, but mine's better."
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2answers
102 views

Can we contract “well have” to “well've”?

Is the contraction of the term "well have" to "well've" grammatically correct? For example, can a sentence beginning "I may as well have . . . " be contracted to "I may as well've . . . "?
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0answers
35 views

Capitalising Contractions [duplicate]

I couldn't really find anything on this, but it has been bugging me for a while. Say for example, you have the following dialogue: 'I'll let Mr. Hall know.' If you want to emulate "dropping the ...
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2answers
58 views

What are the contraction rules for noun such as Bob, tickets, concert, etc?

Ok, Here is the tricky ones. Googling "The concert's sold out" returns no result, whereas googling "The concert was sold out" returns a lot of result. Also, I don't see anyone say "the tickets're ...
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2answers
9k views

“I won't” vs. “I'll not”

I won’t and I’ll not are both short forms of I will not. Both are used in English. Are there any situations where one is preferred over other?
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3answers
26k views

“Do you not” vs. “Don't you”

I live in the UK and I mostly hear people saying Don't you..., but some people say: Do you not...? What is the difference and which one is more correct? You can put any example really. Something like:...
8
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3answers
513 views

Is there an exception to the prohibition against ending a sentence with “ ’s ” at work here?

The ’s can be used as a contraction representing a weak, unstressed word that is not pronounced. It allegedly cannot occur in sentence final position. She is not ready, but he is. She’s not ...
11
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3answers
17k views

Is “what’s” a correct short form of “what does”?

E.g. “What’s he think?” Usually ’s is short for “is” so I don’t know.
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0answers
15 views

“been a watching”, “been a playing” - why? [duplicate]

I first encountered adding an "a" before a verb in songs in phrases such as "I've been a-playing". At first I thought that songwriters add it when they need one more syllable to make a verse sound ...
0
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1answer
82 views

Is apostrophe-s ('s) only for “is” and “has”? [closed]

I heard this dictation: "Well, we weren't sure. We were thinking the ride's going to start up again." As a stenographer, my job is to transcribe. If I were to turn "ride's" into two words, would this ...
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1answer
186 views

What does 's mean at the end of someone's name? [closed]

I understand 's means is and has, if 's is used at the end of a name, Does it mean is or has?Let's suppose Ex is a someone's name. Ex is object -it can mean Ex is an object, totally incorrect ...
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1answer
64 views

You cannot contract “there are”!!. Right or Wrong? [duplicate]

This website said You cannot contract "there are" Ex: There are nine cats on the roof. So, we can not say There're nine cats on the roof. right?
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3answers
4k views

Should contractions be avoided in formal emails?

In a formal email of the kind where you begin with "Dear Mr. Surname" and finish with "Best regards", for example, should we use the following contractions? Or are the non contracted forms more ...
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9answers
9k views

How is y’all’dn’t’ve pronounced

According to Wikipedia, y’all’dn’t’ve is a valid contraction. I am having difficulty pronouncing the L-D-N-T-V consonant cluster, especially since there is no vowel at the end (silent E). Y’all’dn’t’...
11
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5answers
820 views

Is this contraction of 'there is' acceptable to native speakers of English?

In the Slate article, The Curse of “You May Also Like”, the following sentence has a contraction of there is that doesn't sit well with my ear for American or British English. I wonder whether any of ...
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1answer
489 views

“Let's”: similar contractions?

First, I'm aware of this question: "Let's" vs. "lets": which is correct? What I want to know is if there are other similar constructions formed by contracting a verb with "us"....
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2answers
400 views

“Why didn't he” vs. “Why did not he”

I understand that [ didn't = did not]. But is it correct to write the following? Why didn't he come to work? Why did not he come to work? And can it be written as follows? Why he didn't ...
8
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3answers
29k views

Usage of “ain't”?

As far as I understand, "ain't" can mean either "isn't" (ain't no sunshine) or "hasn't" (you ain't seen nothing yet). Are there any rules when "ain't" is used? Does it have a different meaning than "...
3
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3answers
154 views

Can I use a contraction with names or only with subject pronouns?

I have a doubt. Can I use this contraction? Karen and Tony've got a computer Instead of the full form of have got : Karen and Tony have got a computer Which one should I use? Or, are both ...
16
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4answers
15k views

“It isn't” vs. “it's not”

Is one stronger than the other? More correct? Just curious, one of the many abstract things to pop into my head on the drive home today...
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1answer
101 views

Is there a rule for abbreviating is to 's?

Sometimes, we abbreviate sentences like "Nobody is ready" to "Nobody's ready". Is there a rule about this, and is "Nobody's ready" correct or is this considered incorrect? My apologies if this was ...
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1answer
46 views

Do more contractions always mean more informality?

As my limited experience in English indicates, more contractions are used in spoken English than in written. Moreover, too many contractions favor casualness. Compare: I would not have come. I ...
54
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10answers
11k views

Grammatically correct sentence where “you're” and “your” can be interchanged? [closed]

Most grammar checkers are capable of detecting the the misuse of "your" and "you're"; providing the necessary correction. I'm curious though, is there any sentence that can be constructed where ...
0
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0answers
161 views

I wouldn't vs I'd not

I'm defending my word choice to an editor in a novel I've written. There are two points of view: one is a native Irish speaker, and the other, an American born and raised here. They're both eighteen. ...
1
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0answers
33 views

When “you're” is incorrect? [duplicate]

I saw a meme that said, "I'm smarter than you're." It obviously seems wrong (just from the context of the joke), but why? If you're = you are, then what makes such a construct grammatically incorrect ...
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2answers
55 views

What does “Mustn't've” mean? [closed]

This word is pretty confusing to me. Please explain. Does it mean must not have?
9
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4answers
17k views

How can we distinguish between “I would” and “I had” if someone says “I'd”?

How can we unambiguously distinguish between I would and I had, if the native English speaker used the contraction I'd? For instance, I'd read the newspaper. We can mean the above sentence as either ...
2
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1answer
56 views

does apropos have contradictory meanings? [closed]

Definitions: 1) with reference to; concerning. 2) very appropriate to a particular situation. 3) used to state a speaker's belief that someone's comments or acts are unrelated to any previous ...
2
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3answers
5k views

Is “that've” a valid contraction for “that have”?

Is "that've" a valid contraction for "that have"? For example, the sentence: "I've been working with some substances that've been detrimental to my health." It follows the patterns of other similar ...
1
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7answers
2k views

Who/What decides if a word is “proper” English?

I was taught since kindergarten that "ain't" isn't a proper English word. I was wondering, who determines which words are acceptable and which words are not? Do words ever go from "improper" to ...
3
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3answers
3k views

Explanation for “them's”

Recently someone said to me: Them's the rules I thought he had the sentence wrong, but as it turns out it is slang. I am learning English as a second language and I would really appreciate if ...
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4answers
1k views

“There is” vs. “there are” when contracted [duplicate]

Unless I am mistaken, when referring to a single thing or entity, one can say there is or there's (the contraction of the same). When referring to more than one of something, the correct wording is ...
0
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1answer
125 views

Contraction of “I was”?

Is there a contraction for "I was"? There are contractions for "I am" (I'm), "I will" (I'll), "I have" (I've), "I would" (I'd), and yet the simple past tense seems conspicuously missing. Why is ...
0
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0answers
32 views

Can the “ 'll ” contraction be used with nouns and proper nouns? [duplicate]

As the title suggests, is there a specific rule as such to be followed when using " 'll " in a contraction, especially with proper nouns/nouns. While I did find articles related to " 's", couldn't ...
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0answers
30 views

When contractions shouldn't be contractions [duplicate]

I was reading a comment that was made on SO that sounded strange to me [That feature] should've better support in [the] next version My first reaction to this was that it needs to be "should ...
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7answers
8k views

Difference in pronunciation between “your” and “you're”?

I'm a native English speaker (Texas counts, I suppose), and I pronounce "your" to rhyme with "core", and "you're" to rhyme with "cure". Is it just me or did I pick this up somewhere?
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3answers
110 views

Does a contraction allow for the use of a preposition at the end of a sentence?

Does a contraction allow for the use of a preposition at the end of a sentence? Take the following sentence, for example: Where is it at (not correct grammar) and Where's it at? (unknown) You ...
0
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4answers
5k views

Using the contraction of “are”

Are there limited number of words we can append a 're to? Are the following words correct: where're here're