A contraction is a shortened version of the written and spoken forms of a word, syllable, or word group, created by omission of internal letters.

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10
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5answers
1k views

Do Americans say “don't” as often as the British?

this is really a question for Americans. When watching US TV or films, it's often my impression that, while using all the other contractions, Americans don't seem so keen on 'don't', but use 'do not' ...
0
votes
4answers
421 views

Use of ' to indicate missing letters/text

You can write this ol' man 'ere when you mean this old man here But can the ' be used to indicate whole missing sentence parts? For example: 'been a pleasure! for It's been a ...
2
votes
7answers
1k views

Who/What decides if a word is “proper” English?

I was taught since kindergarten that "ain't" isn't a proper English word. I was wondering, who determines which words are acceptable and which words are not? Do words ever go from "improper" to ...
2
votes
2answers
5k views

Why do we say “This is ” instead of “This's”?

It is => It's I am => I'm That is => That's Why do we say "This is " instead of "This's"?
1
vote
1answer
366 views

Contracting “Should not have” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Can a word be contracted twice (e.g. "I'ven't")? What is the correct way to contract "should not have", if there is one? "Should have" becomes ...
1
vote
1answer
377 views

“Let's”: similar contractions

First, I'm aware of this question. What I want to know is if there are other similar constructs, done by contracting a verb with "us".
1
vote
2answers
6k views

Shouldn't have vs. Shouldn't of [closed]

Got into an argument with someone I know about this. I think "shouldn't of" is incorrect and comes from people typing the phrase the way they're used to pronouncing it. He believes both are correct. ...
2
votes
2answers
292 views

Is there any syntactic technicality preventing double contractions from ever becoming valid? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: Is “I'd've” proper use of the English Language? Can a word be contracted twice (e.g. “I'ven't”)? I think the contraction ...
28
votes
12answers
6k views

Can a word be contracted twice (e.g. “I'ven't”)?

I've seen a contraction of two words. I can't see why it wouldn't be possible to contract twice. Is it possible and how should it be punctuated? Update: Ok, to sum up the answers so far This ...
0
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3answers
2k views

Using the contraction of “are”

Are there limited number of words we can append a 're to? Are the following words correct: where're here're
3
votes
2answers
390 views

Is “Most of it's in English” normal English?

The phrase "Most of it's in English" is grammatically correct (it's short for "Most of it is in English"), but it doesn't feel right. Is there a reason it doesn't feel right? Edit: The thing I'm ...
1
vote
1answer
141 views

Impugned and pugn'd

In Jingo, by Terry Pratchet, Lord Vetinari says: "... Sergeant Colon and Corporal Nobbs have never been pugn'd in their entire lives." What about "pugn'd"? Is it just a contraction for ...
5
votes
1answer
206 views

Is there a word for the single letter contractions commonly used in store names? (see examples)

Is there a term for the single letter contractions as used in the following examples? Toys 'r' us Stop 'n' go Note: Trademarks above corrected for proper grammar.
7
votes
3answers
3k views

Does “you're” also qualify as a valid contraction for “you were”?

If not, is there a way to write "you were" in a short form?
1
vote
3answers
135 views

When should I use “your”, and when “you're”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Your” vs. “you're”: Why the confusion? Instead of saying "you're free to [...]," I've seen many people use "your free to [...]." I've seen ...
2
votes
2answers
311 views

Difference between “had [verb] not to” and “hadn't [verb] to”

When we talk about things that we intended to do, but didn't or will not do in the future, we can use past perfect. I did a question in a reference book: I hadn't intended to become a doctor, I ...
0
votes
0answers
99 views

“It isn't” versus “it's not” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “It isn't” versus “it's not” Is there any difference in meaning, or supposed impression when hearing it?
2
votes
1answer
387 views

Using “it's” vs. using “it is” at the end of a sentence [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there some rule against ending a sentence with the contraction “it's”? Why is it that the following sounds incorrect: "Would she know where it's?" ...
7
votes
1answer
604 views

With the phrase “good night” do you have to use an apostrophe before the word “night” if you are to omit the use of “good?”

Am I actually contracting the phrase by omitting "good" from it, hence the need for the use of an apostrophe?
2
votes
1answer
813 views

Is “as oft” a valid contraction of “as often”? If it is, then why doesn't it have an apostrophe at the end?

Is "as oft" a valid contraction of "as often"? If it is, then why doesn't it have an apostrophe at the end?
5
votes
5answers
2k views

Is this usage of “aren't” proper English?

Aren't you going to go outside? My wife insists this is improper English, Hillbilly speak, she calls it. The proper way to ask, she says, is Are you going to go outside? I say it's the same as ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

Contraction for 'are' with nouns

Is this correct? the candys 're in the box, the womens're at the car I know 'you're', 'we're', 'they're' are valid usages, but can it be used for nouns?
4
votes
2answers
393 views

Mixing contracted and uncontracted phrases in the same sentence

Is there anything wrong with mixing contracted with uncontracted phrases in the same sentence? Examples: I'm not sure it is possible. ("I'm" is contracted, but "it is" is not). I am not ...
5
votes
2answers
629 views

Usage of contractions like “it's” and “that's” in textbooks

Is it considered bad style to use abbreviations contractions like "it's" and "that's" (instead of spelling them out as "it is" and "that is") in a textbook or academic publication?
3
votes
1answer
13k views

Why is “will not” contracted as “won't”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is “won't” a contraction of? The Why is "cannot" spelled as one word? post brought back another oddity I noticed when learning English. The ...