A contraction is a shortened version of the written and spoken forms of a word, syllable, or word group, created by omission of internal letters.

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2answers
368 views

Orthography of definite-article contractions in the Yorkshire dialect

In the Yorkshire accent the definite article is shortened to just t. E.g. 'I went on the bus' becomes something that sounds like 'I went ont bus'. How does one punctuate this? Is it 'I went on t'bus', ...
1
vote
1answer
100 views

Spelling of contracted years

Full years can be contracted to two digits like He graduated the university in '92. What I'd like to ask is how would this sentence be spelled out: "in 'ninety two"? "in ninety two"? maybe, ...
0
votes
0answers
191 views

What is your preference on the use of n't in different situations? [duplicate]

Throughout highschool and college I was told "n't" (e.g. can't, wouldn't, shouldn't) should not be used in essays. The manner of which the use of "n't" was bastardized by many people who I considered ...
8
votes
1answer
1k views

Word contractions in Shakespeare's plays

In Shakespeare's plays it is common to find contracted words, such as "o'er", "e'en", "sulph'uous", "ta'en". Is it just a literary device or those words were actually pronounced (in day-to-day speech) ...
6
votes
5answers
1k views

Can “I are” be shortened to “I're”?

I just received a message containing "I're": Glad April and I're so different. I've never seen this used before (I suppose as it's so unnecessary, saving just one character when writing) yet I ...
15
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4answers
12k views

“It isn't” vs. “it's not”

Is one stronger than the other? More correct? Just curious, one of the many abstract things to pop into my head on the drive home today...
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2answers
122 views

Contraction in “Your file'll be downloaded…”

Is it correct to use the contraction in Your file'll be downloaded...? I don't know. It just doesn't sound right to me. English is not my first language, so maybe someone here could shed some light on ...
4
votes
3answers
973 views

Is it Standard American English to ever contract “did” as “-'d”?

Assuming that it is Standard American English to contract would as -'d, is it standard to contract did as -'d? For example: I would really like to have a glass of single malt scotch right now. ...
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votes
2answers
144 views

“Why Can't I” and “Why Can Not I” [duplicate]

Is "Why can not I" grammatically correct? If not, why is "Why can't I" grammatically correct?
3
votes
2answers
280 views

Whatever happened to “eyeglasses”, “facial tissues”, and “video game consoles”?

Now-a-days, we tend to ask:"Have you seen my glasses anywhere?" "Do you have any spare tissues to lend me?" and "How many consoles do you own?" It's just quicker to say and any native speaker will ...
6
votes
8answers
1k views

“I'd-a lost”? What does this contraction stand for?

The first lines of George Thorogood's version of "One bourbon, one scotch, one beer": Wanna tell you a story about the houseman blues. I come home one Friday, had to tell the landlady I'd-a ...
0
votes
1answer
161 views

Examples of Apheretic forms in English?

I am looking for a comprehensive list of Apheretic forms in English. I remember seeing in old books words being prefixed with apostrophes which do not require them in modern writing, but can't ...
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3answers
6k views

Why is “you all” contracted to “y'all” and not “you'll”?

Is you'll also valid in the context of this video? Or is viper just setting new rules down in the English language?
-1
votes
1answer
226 views

Contractions With “Has” [duplicate]

Is it acceptable to make a contraction with an arbitrary noun and the word "has" to create a more conversational style in writing? For example, can I write... "Tomorrow, when the storm's blown ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Are compound contractions proper grammar? [duplicate]

I've been told that compound contractions like couldn't've and I'd've are proper grammar. Are they?
5
votes
6answers
8k views

What is the difference between “’ll” and “will”?

Is there any difference in the meaning when we use 'll or will? For example, I will go to university tomorrow. I'll go to university tomorrow.
11
votes
3answers
14k views

Is “what’s” a correct short form of “what does”?

E.g. “What’s he think?” Usually ’s is short for “is” so I don’t know.
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Is a possessive noun a contraction?

I was told not to use contractions in an essay. My classmate wrote "the argument of Emily" but I preferred "Emily's argument". He disagreed and claimed "Emily's" is a contraction.
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Is “e'er” a true English word?

Are poetic contractions, such as "e'er", "o'er" and "ne'er" (and other less common ones), English? As in officially recognized?
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Were contractions used in spoken English in 18th-century London?

I am currently writing a story set in London of 1795. I am trying my best to avoid linguistic anachronisms in the dialogue, but I have had difficulty finding reliable resources regarding spoken ...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

When to use “programming's” vs. “programming is” [duplicate]

My sentence can be said as: Programming is fun. and it can also be said as: Programming's fun. Both seem to be correct. When should I use one instead of the other?
2
votes
0answers
2k views

Contradictory Idioms [closed]

I stumbled across some contradictory idioms, and it made me wonder how many idioms can be contradicted with other idioms! Some that I've collected so far: The pen is mightier than the sword ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Why does the “e” in judge vanish in the word “judgment”?

The in the word "judgment", the "e" from "judge" is absent. Three questions on this: Why is this? Is there a name for such a contraction? How and why does the "g" still retain its "soft" ...
8
votes
1answer
2k views

What is the possessive form of “y'all”?

I generally hear y'alls's used as the possessive form, but I have also heard yourn. Since y'all is a colloquial pronoun, its possessive form is basically liberated from prescriptive linguistics which ...
0
votes
2answers
329 views

Has the contraction “you’re” finally been replaced by “your”?

Your is almost universally used these days for you’re (“you are”). Is the misuse of your a result of ignorance, or is the contraction now formally dead?
0
votes
1answer
4k views

“What say we [suggestion (verb phrase)]”

I would like to understand the history of the modern expression “what say we” followed immediately by a verb phrase, used to make a suggestion and common in informal speech, as attested at Oxford ...
0
votes
1answer
379 views

Using contractions like “I'm” in text [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Using contracted forms (“don’t”, “let’s”) in a formal text Are contractions like "didn't" forbidden in written English? Usage of contractions like ...
4
votes
6answers
49k views

“won't” vs. “wouldn't”

Are these two words interchangeable? How do you know when to use one or the other? For some sentences it is easy to know which one to use, but not for others. The type of sentences that are difficult ...
2
votes
2answers
484 views

Why is an apostrophe used in the genitive “-’s”?

The English possessive isn’t a contraction, but rather a relic of the grammatical case system, so why is an apostrophe used in (most) forms of the possessive?
2
votes
1answer
2k views

“If you don't do it, I'll”. Why does that sentence feel so awkward? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there some rule against ending a sentence with the contraction “it’s”? Earlier today while writing a very informal email, I expressed: If you don't do it, I will. ...
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votes
5answers
6k views

“that's why” in formal essays

"I'm", "it's" are forbidden in formal essays. Can I use "that's why" in the opening of my Statement of Purpose? Fancy flights used to fill me with euphoria, that's why I named myself Joseph, but ...
1
vote
3answers
3k views

There isn't and there is no [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “There is no rule” vs. “there isn’t rule” If I'm not mistaken, both "There isn't a storm." and "There is no storm." have the same meaning. I understand that the first ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

“I wouldn't ever” vs. “I would never”

The two expressions from the title, “I wouldn't ever” and “I would never”, are very similar. But are they completely equivalent or do they bear any subtle differences? If so, how do they differ in ...
5
votes
8answers
5k views

Are contractions like “didn't” forbidden in written English? [duplicate]

Possible duplicate of: Using contracted forms (“don't”, “let's”) in a formal text Usage of contractions like “it's” and “that's” in textbooks Should ...
2
votes
2answers
382 views

Use of contractions in an exam

I am teaching Intermediate Level English to exam students in Spain and I have been asked when is it correct to use contractions. I am of the understanding that, in an oral or written exam, it would be ...
5
votes
2answers
8k views

“I won't” vs. “I'll not”

I won’t and I’ll not are both short forms of I will not. Both are used in English. Are there any situations where one is preferred over other?
1
vote
1answer
591 views

Usage of “ain't” in formal conversation

Is it okay to use ain't in formal conversation? I know ain't can be used for am not, is not, are not, have not, has not. So if I can use it in day-to-day life, it will be easier for me I guess.
9
votes
2answers
6k views

Apostrophes in contractions: shan't, sha'n't or sha'nt?

I came across the word sha'n't when reading Winnie the Pooh the other day and it cast me into a Thoughtful Mood concerning the Appropriate Spelling of this word. This word is a contraction of "shall ...
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4answers
1k views

“There is no rule” vs. “there isn't rule”

What are the differences between the two sentences below: There is no rule. There isn't rule.
12
votes
3answers
16k views

Were contractions less common in olden days?

We just viewed the new movie True Grit. The language of the characters was more formal sounding than we are used to, largely because of the absence of contractions. Is this historically accurate? Do ...
1
vote
4answers
271 views

“Can take no other” vs. “can't take other”

As an ESL I'm not sure if I can use the following sentences: You can take no other directions. I'm using it on giving indications to a foreigner. Should I use instead: You can't take other ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

“Is it not raining” vs. “Isn't it raining”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Tag Questions “is he not” Which is correct: Is it not raining today? Isn't it raining today?
4
votes
3answers
13k views

Counting contractions as one or two words [closed]

I read this in a product review, and it has been bugging me all day. Three words: it's really cheap. "It's" is obviously a contraction of two words, but does it count as one or two words?
9
votes
2answers
589 views

Is there a rule for when contractions are not possible? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there some rule against ending a sentence with the contraction “it's”? In conversing with non-native English speakers online, I saw someone type: ...
6
votes
1answer
221 views

Should a contraction taken from the center of a word have two apostrophes? [closed]

I'm currently reading Entrepreneur Magazine, and there is a story profiling a 13-year-old who created a series of stickers to embellish Lego blocks. The subtitle of the story reads A pint-size ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Using abbreviations incorrectly?

In English it's considered correct to ask I do it like this, don't I? or Why can't I go? whereas "don't" is an abbreviation of "do not" and "can't" is an abbreviation of "cannot". ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

“You're not” vs. “you ain't” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What does “ain't” mean? What's the difference between "you're not" and "you ain't" ("...coming home")? I do realize that ain't is a contraction of are ...
15
votes
2answers
4k views

Is it incorrect to say, “Why cannot…?”

At any point in history was "Why cannot...?" used as frequently as "Why can't...?" Is it even grammatically correct to say "Why cannot you do this?" I know it can be rearranged to be "Why can you not ...
1
vote
3answers
498 views

Are contractions worth all the trouble? [closed]

One of the most difficult things even for native speakers of English to learn is the correct use of contractions. To this day when I type it and want to follow it with s I have to spend a fraction of ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

What is the correct usage of contractions like “isn't” and “wasn't”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do contractions (e.g. “don't”) and full phrases (e.g. “do not”) have the same meaning? I frequently see contractions such as "isn't" and ...