A contraction is a shortened version of the written and spoken forms of a word, syllable, or word group, created by omission of internal letters.

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4answers
525 views

“You ain't able to be sure about anything.”

Does this sentence make any sense to you as a native speaker? The one who said this actually meant to say, "People like you can never be sure about anything" (implying the opposite side is very ...
10
votes
4answers
474 views

Is it okay to say and write “ain't” yet?

Over 10 years ago saying "ain't" was discouraged but it was gaining momentum. What happened? Seems like it's still discouraged. Maybe in another 10 years?
7
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1answer
1k views

Why would you write “ain't”? Isn't it a contraction only used in spoken English?

I often hear in English conversation or movies the contraction "ain't" (for "isn't"), but I am more surprised to see it in writing (and I am not referring to a novel, where I can understand its usage: ...
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3answers
876 views

Is “ain’t” slang, or is it colloquial instead?

Does using the word ain’t in a song make it slang, whereas using it in a speech make it colloquial?
2
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3answers
2k views

What does “ain't” mean?

What does the contraction ain't mean? Is it appropriate to use it in formal settings?
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5answers
6k views

Why is “ain't” not listed in dictionaries?

Google finds 52,000,000 matches for ain't but non-natives simply can't look up this word. Wiktionary isn't helpful. Is it some kind of 'wildcard' for "am/is/are not"?
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6answers
2k views

Are contractions of “I am” or “I would” rude? [closed]

I got edited on Stack Overflow because I used "I'm", "you're" and "I'd" instead of "I am" etc. Is it considered rude to use contractions like that in informal conversations on the internet? I would ...
1
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1answer
14k views

Meaning of “How'd you know?”: “would”, “did”, or “do”?

Does the question "How'd you know" mean: How do you know? How did you know? How would you?
1
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1answer
259 views

What does “a'me” mean?

Only boss a'me, is me. What is the meaning of "a'me" in the above sentence?
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0answers
143 views

Word Frequency List Including Contractions [closed]

A quick search on the internet, gives me frequency lists for say the top 300 most commonly used words. But I haven't been able to find a list which includes contractions. I'm creating a form of ...
1
vote
1answer
271 views

Why does the word “never” not contain an apostrophe?

If never is a contraction of 'not ever' why does it not have an apostrophe, i.e. why is it not written n'ever rather than never? I can understand that the apostrophe has simply fallen out of use, but ...
14
votes
7answers
16k views

“that” + “would” = “that'd”?

Is "that'd" an appropriate contraction of "that" and "would"? I say it, but I'm not sure if it's a legitimate contraction in written form.
0
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3answers
187 views

Is this the right way to use “wouldn't”?

I apologize if this is a duplicate or anything for that matter but I didn't locate any questions on it. I have this phrase I wrote and it is confusing me a little bit. An OAHU Agent can help at ...
0
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2answers
519 views

Is there a contraction for “where are” like “where's” for “where are”?

What is a contraction for where are? I wanted to ask "Where are the keys?" but want to use a contraction. Do I have to just say Where are, or can I say Where's and it's understood?
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Forming the possessive of a username that is a contraction

Suppose there was a user of one of these sites whose handle was Won't. How would one form the possessive of this username to refer to that user's post?* Won't's answer Given that the 's ...
7
votes
1answer
28k views

When to use “cannot” versus “can't”?

When is it best to write "can't" versus writing "cannot"? Are they interchangeable in every situation?
1
vote
3answers
176 views

What type of word is “abnomaly”?

I've got a coworker that frequently uses the word, "abnomaly", not "abnormal" and not "anomaly", but "abnomaly". While the types of these words differ (i.e. adjective versus noun), the meanings are ...
4
votes
3answers
982 views

Can I use the “ll” contraction with proper names?

Can I contract "will" as "ll" when preceded by a proper name? For example: John will visit you tomorrow John'll visit you tomorrow I am inclined to think this is not acceptable in standard ...
8
votes
4answers
1k views

Word for describing someone whose name is the opposite of what they are?

I was wondering if there is a word to describe someone whose name is diametrically oppossed to who they are. For instance a firefighter whose last name is Arson or a swimmer whose last name is Dry.
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2answers
304 views

Appropriate title case: 'em or 'Em or 'EM

It's a common practice to capitalize headings/titles of articles. But is there a correct or conventional way to capitalize words in titles that are apocopated apheresed at the beginning? E.g. ...
20
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5answers
55k views

“Do's” and “don'ts” or “do's” and “don't's”?

I am making a list to my children telling them what are some of the things they should do and shouldn't. Under one side is "do", and the other is "don't". Would I write "do's" and "don't's"? Cause ...
2
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2answers
205 views

Orthography of definite-article contractions in the Yorkshire dialect

In the Yorkshire accent the definite article is shortened to just t. E.g. 'I went on the bus' becomes something that sounds like 'I went ont bus'. How does one punctuate this? Is it 'I went on t'bus', ...
1
vote
1answer
73 views

Spelling of contracted years

Full years can be contracted to two digits like He graduated the university in '92. What I'd like to ask is how would this sentence be spelled out: "in 'ninety two"? "in ninety two"? maybe, ...
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0answers
86 views

What is your preference on the use of n't in different situations? [duplicate]

Throughout highschool and college I was told "n't" (e.g. can't, wouldn't, shouldn't) should not be used in essays. The manner of which the use of "n't" was bastardized by many people who I considered ...
8
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1answer
1k views

Word contractions in Shakespeare's plays

In Shakespeare's plays it is common to find contracted words, such as "o'er", "e'en", "sulph'uous", "ta'en". Is it just a literary device or those words were actually pronounced (in day-to-day speech) ...
9
votes
2answers
372 views

How was “ben't” used, and when did it cease to be used?

In Jane Austen's The Watsons, the maid of the titular family utters the following sentence: "Please, ma'am, master wants to know why he ben't to have his dinner?" I have never encountered ben't ...
6
votes
5answers
388 views

Can “I are” be shortened to “I're”?

I just received a message containing "I're": Glad April and I're so different. I've never seen this used before (I suppose as it's so unnecessary, saving just one character when writing) yet I ...
9
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4answers
5k views

“It isn't” vs. “it's not”

Is one stronger than the other? More correct? Just curious, one of the many abstract things to pop into my head on the drive home today...
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2answers
96 views

Contraction in “Your file'll be downloaded…”

Is it correct to use the contraction in Your file'll be downloaded...? I don't know. It just doesn't sound right to me. English is not my first language, so maybe someone here could shed some light on ...
4
votes
3answers
304 views

Is it Standard American English to ever contract “did” as “-'d”?

Assuming that it is Standard American English to contract would as -'d, is it standard to contract did as -'d? For example: I would really like to have a glass of single malt scotch right now. ...
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2answers
86 views

“Why Can't I” and “Why Can Not I” [duplicate]

Is "Why can not I" grammatically correct? If not, why is "Why can't I" grammatically correct?
3
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2answers
237 views

Whatever happened to “eyeglasses”, “facial tissues”, and “video game consoles”?

Now-a-days, we tend to ask:"Have you seen my glasses anywhere?" "Do you have any spare tissues to lend me?" and "How many consoles do you own?" It's just quicker to say and any native speaker will ...
6
votes
8answers
869 views

“I'd-a lost”? What does this contraction stand for?

The first lines of George Thorogood's version of "One bourbon, one scotch, one beer": Wanna tell you a story about the houseman blues. I come home one Friday, had to tell the landlady I'd-a ...
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1answer
132 views

Examples of Apheretic forms in English?

I am looking for a comprehensive list of Apheretic forms in English. I remember seeing in old books words being prefixed with apostrophes which do not require them in modern writing, but can't ...
0
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3answers
984 views

Why is “you all” contracted to “y'all” and not “you'll”?

Is you'll also valid in the context of this video? Or is viper just setting new rules down in the English language?
-1
votes
1answer
142 views

Contractions With “Has” [duplicate]

Is it acceptable to make a contraction with an arbitrary noun and the word "has" to create a more conversational style in writing? For example, can I write... "Tomorrow, when the storm's blown ...
56
votes
11answers
22k views

Is “I'd've” proper use of the English language?

While reading a book, I came across the word I'd've, as in: I'd've argued against it. While it was obvious what it meant, it left me puzzled. Is I'd've a proper word?
3
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1answer
587 views

Are compound contractions proper grammar? [duplicate]

I've been told that compound contractions like couldn't've and I'd've are proper grammar. Are they?
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6answers
4k views

What is the difference between “’ll” and “will”?

Is there any difference in the meaning when we use 'll or will? For example, I will go to university tomorrow. I'll go to university tomorrow.
6
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3answers
6k views

Is “what’s” a correct short form of “what does”?

E.g. “What’s he think?” Usually ’s is short for “is” so I don’t know.
0
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2answers
734 views

Why are contractions considered unprofessional?

I've heard people specify not to use contractions in order to maintain a degree of professionalism. I've heard this mentioned by fellow students while in school as well. I've never heard this with ...
2
votes
2answers
716 views

What’s the word for the habit of writing “play’d” or “revolv’d”?

I’m working on an 18th-century manuscript, and I’m trying to explain to others the use of ’d in past tense verbs. Is there a word that encompasses the usage of ’d in early 18th-century manuscripts? ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Is a possessive noun a contraction?

I was told not to use contractions in an essay. My classmate wrote "the argument of Emily" but I preferred "Emily's argument". He disagreed and claimed "Emily's" is a contraction.
2
votes
3answers
672 views

Is “e'er” a true English word?

Are poetic contractions, such as "e'er", "o'er" and "ne'er" (and other less common ones), English? As in officially recognized?
4
votes
3answers
812 views

Were contractions used in spoken English in 18th-century London?

I am currently writing a story set in London of 1795. I am trying my best to avoid linguistic anachronisms in the dialogue, but I have had difficulty finding reliable resources regarding spoken ...
0
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0answers
44 views

When to use “programming's” vs. “programming is” [duplicate]

My sentence can be said as: Programming is fun. and it can also be said as: Programming's fun. Both seem to be correct. When should I use one instead of the other?
2
votes
0answers
1k views

Contradictory Idioms [closed]

I stumbled across some contradictory idioms, and it made me wonder how many idioms can be contradicted with other idioms! Some that I've collected so far: The pen is mightier than the sword ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

Is “that've” a valid contraction for “that have”?

Is "that've" a valid contraction for "that have"? For example, the sentence: "I've been working with some substances that've been detrimental to my health." It follows the patterns of other similar ...
8
votes
6answers
4k views

Difference in pronunciation between “your” and “you're”?

I'm a native English speaker (Texas counts, I suppose), and I pronounce "your" to rhyme with "core", and "you're" to rhyme with "cure". Is it just me or did I pick this up somewhere?
5
votes
1answer
486 views

Why does the “e” in judge vanish in the word “judgment”?

The in the word "judgment", the "e" from "judge" is absent. Three questions on this: Why is this? Is there a name for such a contraction? How and why does the "g" still retain its "soft" ...