8
votes
2answers
206 views

Is there an exception to the prohibition against ending a sentence with “ ’s ” at work here?

The ’s can be used as a contraction representing a weak, unstressed word that is not pronounced. It allegedly cannot occur in sentence final position. She is not ready, but he is. She’s not ...
6
votes
5answers
365 views

Can “I are” be shortened to “I're”?

I just received a message containing "I're": Glad April and I're so different. I've never seen this used before (I suppose as it's so unnecessary, saving just one character when writing) yet I ...
4
votes
3answers
287 views

Is it Standard American English to ever contract “did” as “-'d”?

Assuming that it is Standard American English to contract would as -'d, is it standard to contract did as -'d? For example: I would really like to have a glass of single malt scotch right now. ...
4
votes
3answers
932 views

Can I use the “ll” contraction with proper names?

Can I contract "will" as "ll" when preceded by a proper name? For example: John will visit you tomorrow John'll visit you tomorrow I am inclined to think this is not acceptable in standard ...
3
votes
1answer
566 views

Are compound contractions proper grammar? [duplicate]

I've been told that compound contractions like couldn't've and I'd've are proper grammar. Are they?
-2
votes
4answers
453 views

“There is” vs. “there are” when contracted [duplicate]

Unless I am mistaken, when referring to a single thing or entity, one can say there is or there's (the contraction of the same). When referring to more than one of something, the correct wording is ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What's wrong with this sentence? [closed]

I've noticed a few times recently that a generic, but well known text editor seems to be flagging up stuff that I'm sure is correct. For example, in the below sentence, the generic, but well known ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

“Is it not raining” vs. “Isn't it raining”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Tag Questions “is he not” Which is correct: Is it not raining today? Isn't it raining today?
1
vote
2answers
1k views

What is the correct usage of contractions like “isn't” and “wasn't”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do contractions (e.g. “don't”) and full phrases (e.g. “do not”) have the same meaning? I frequently see contractions such as "isn't" and ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Is “<NOUN>'s” (contraction) proper English? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it grammatically correct to create a contraction of words followed by “is”? Using contracted forms (“don't”, “let's”) in a formal text Should ...
4
votes
1answer
171 views

Should the use of apostrophes be consistent?

It is time to rock, but don't be too loud. Is it recommended to stay consistent with the use of apostrophes? Should it instead be: It's time to rock, but don't be too loud. If that is fine ...
15
votes
2answers
2k views

Is it incorrect to say, “Why cannot…?”

At any point in history was "Why cannot...?" used as frequently as "Why can't...?" Is it even grammatically correct to say "Why cannot you do this?" I know it can be rearranged to be "Why can you not ...
5
votes
4answers
2k views

Contraction of “is not”

How exactly can you contract the phrase "is not"? More specifically, what's the difference between the sentences, "The dog isn't running." and "The dog's not running."? They both sound correct to ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Using the contraction of “are”

Are there limited number of words we can append a 're to? Are the following words correct: where're here're
3
votes
4answers
10k views

Is “aren't I” correct grammar?

Since "amn't I" is so clunky, is "aren't I" grammatically correct? Or is the only way to say this "Am I not"?
0
votes
4answers
514 views

“You ain't able to be sure about anything.”

Does this sentence make any sense to you as a native speaker? The one who said this actually meant to say, "People like you can never be sure about anything" (implying the opposite side is very ...
3
votes
2answers
347 views

When is it ok to create a contraction of words followed by “s”?

When is it correct to create a contraction of words followed by is? For instance is who’s a correct short form of who is?
5
votes
5answers
2k views

Is this usage of “aren't” proper English?

Aren't you going to go outside? My wife insists this is improper English, Hillbilly speak, she calls it. The proper way to ask, she says, is Are you going to go outside? I say it's the same as ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

Can you contract the main verb in a sentence?

One can contract I have to I've when have is a helping verb, e.g. I've got an octopus in my pants. Is contracting the main verb technically incorrect or merely antiquated? My father loves to ...
4
votes
2answers
11k views

Is “could've” or “should've” standard English?

As the title says — is "could've" or "should've" standard English or is it slang and should correctly be spelled "could have" and "should have"?
4
votes
2answers
438 views

Mixing contracted and uncontracted phrases in the same sentence

Is there anything wrong with mixing contracted with uncontracted phrases in the same sentence? Examples: I'm not sure it is possible. ("I'm" is contracted, but "it is" is not). I am not ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

When did “y'all” become improper?

It is my understanding that the contraction y'all was considered correct American English in times past. At what point was this word removed from valid American English?
5
votes
4answers
1k views

Contraction for 'are' with nouns

Is this correct? the candys 're in the box, the womens're at the car I know 'you're', 'we're', 'they're' are valid usages, but can it be used for nouns?
14
votes
7answers
16k views

“that” + “would” = “that'd”?

Is "that'd" an appropriate contraction of "that" and "would"? I say it, but I'm not sure if it's a legitimate contraction in written form.
27
votes
6answers
5k views

Is there some rule against ending a sentence with the contraction “it's”?

I heard this lyric in a song the other day and it just sounded so wrong that I assumed it must be incorrect grammar, but I can't find any specific prohibition that applies. That's what it's. ...