A contraction is a shortened version of the written and spoken forms of a word, syllable, or word group, created by omission of internal letters.

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1answer
28 views

Is the sentence “I wonder where he's?” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

The sentence "I wonder where he is?" has no contraction and, in my opinion, feels like it naturally flows compared to using the contraction. Are there any rules that are violated with the contracted ...
1
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0answers
32 views

Capitalising Contractions [duplicate]

I couldn't really find anything on this, but it has been bugging me for a while. Say for example, you have the following dialogue: 'I'll let Mr. Hall know.' If you want to emulate "dropping the ...
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2answers
52 views

What are the contraction rules for noun such as Bob, tickets, concert, etc?

Ok, Here is the tricky ones. Googling "The concert's sold out" returns no result, whereas googling "The concert was sold out" returns a lot of result. Also, I don't see anyone say "the tickets're ...
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0answers
15 views

“been a watching”, “been a playing” - why? [duplicate]

I first encountered adding an "a" before a verb in songs in phrases such as "I've been a-playing". At first I thought that songwriters add it when they need one more syllable to make a verse sound ...
2
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2answers
92 views

Can we contract “well have” to “well've”?

Is the contraction of the term "well have" to "well've" grammatically correct? For example, can a sentence beginning "I may as well have . . . " be contracted to "I may as well've . . . "?
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1answer
80 views

Is apostrophe-s ('s) only for “is” and “has”? [closed]

I heard this dictation: "Well, we weren't sure. We were thinking the ride's going to start up again." As a stenographer, my job is to transcribe. If I were to turn "ride's" into two words, would this ...
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1answer
85 views

What does 's mean at the end of someone's name? [closed]

I understand 's means is and has, if 's is used at the end of a name, Does it mean is or has?Let's suppose Ex is a someone's name. Ex is object -it can mean Ex is an object, totally incorrect ...
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1answer
57 views

You cannot contract “there are”!!. Right or Wrong? [duplicate]

This website said You cannot contract "there are" Ex: There are nine cats on the roof. So, we can not say There're nine cats on the roof. right?
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9answers
8k views

How is y’all’dn’t’ve pronounced

According to Wikipedia, y’all’dn’t’ve is a valid contraction. I am having difficulty pronouncing the L-D-N-T-V consonant cluster, especially since there is no vowel at the end (silent E). ...
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0answers
114 views

I wouldn't vs I'd not

I'm defending my word choice to an editor in a novel I've written. There are two points of view: one is a native Irish speaker, and the other, an American born and raised here. They're both eighteen. ...
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0answers
33 views

When “you're” is incorrect? [duplicate]

I saw a meme that said, "I'm smarter than you're." It obviously seems wrong (just from the context of the joke), but why? If you're = you are, then what makes such a construct grammatically incorrect ...
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2answers
51 views

What does “Mustn't've” mean? [closed]

This word is pretty confusing to me. Please explain. Does it mean must not have?
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2answers
3k views

Isn't a “gonner” or “gonna” slang for a person about to die?

(I think this "blank" moment of mine is what is called in AmEng a brain fart, so be it) Isn't ‘a gonner/gonna’ slang for a person who is about to die? It's said in situations where, potentially, ...
2
votes
1answer
53 views

does apropos have contradictory meanings? [closed]

Definitions: 1) with reference to; concerning. 2) very appropriate to a particular situation. 3) used to state a speaker's belief that someone's comments or acts are unrelated to any previous ...
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1answer
104 views

Contraction of “I was”?

Is there a contraction for "I was"? There are contractions for "I am" (I'm), "I will" (I'll), "I have" (I've), "I would" (I'd), and yet the simple past tense seems conspicuously missing. Why is ...
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0answers
32 views

Can the “ 'll ” contraction be used with nouns and proper nouns? [duplicate]

As the title suggests, is there a specific rule as such to be followed when using " 'll " in a contraction, especially with proper nouns/nouns. While I did find articles related to " 's", couldn't ...
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0answers
30 views

When contractions shouldn't be contractions [duplicate]

I was reading a comment that was made on SO that sounded strange to me [That feature] should've better support in [the] next version My first reaction to this was that it needs to be "should ...
2
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2answers
276 views

“Why didn't he” vs. “Why did not he”

I understand that [ didn't = did not]. But is it correct to write the following? Why didn't he come to work? Why did not he come to work? And can it be written as follows? Why he didn't ...
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1answer
45 views

Do more contractions always mean more informality?

As my limited experience in English indicates, more contractions are used in spoken English than in written. Moreover, too many contractions favor casualness. Compare: I would not have come. I ...
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3answers
92 views

Does a contraction allow for the use of a preposition at the end of a sentence?

Does a contraction allow for the use of a preposition at the end of a sentence? Take the following sentence, for example: Where is it at (not correct grammar) and Where's it at? (unknown) You ...
1
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2answers
593 views

“He Isn't”/“She Isn't” V.S. “He's Not”/“She's Not” [duplicate]

Is there a difference in usage between "he isn't"/"she isn't" and "he's not"/"she's not"?
2
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1answer
86 views

Contractions in odd Places [duplicate]

I understand contractions as just a means of merging two words into one, with some added punctuation, but there's some cases where I feel I'm grammatically correct, but using them incorrectly. For ...
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1answer
57 views

Is a word like 'thx' a contraction or abbreviation?

Putting aside that the use of 'thx' is bad, and it isn't really a word. Would 'thx' be considered a contraction or abbreviation? Contraction: a shortened version of the written and spoken forms of a ...
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1answer
126 views

How to spell the contraction of “might as well”

I often say a word that sounds like "mares-well", as a contraction of "might as well". E.g. if someone said "shall I throw away this bread" I might say "you might as well, it's totally mouldy", except ...
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0answers
71 views

Exceptions to the rule that AAVE can omit “is” and “are” iff the corresponding form in standard English can be contracted?

According to Wikipedia: Only the forms is and are (of which the latter is anyway often replaced by is) can be omitted; am, was, and were are not deleted. These forms cannot be omitted when ...
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2answers
85 views

Is it correct to replace “what does” with “what's”?

I recently came across a sentence in a online publication that used apostrophe-"S" as replacement for "does". I was wondering; is this allowed? I only know "what's" as replacement for "what is". The ...
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1answer
81 views

Is there a term for removing contractions?

Is there an English verb for removing contractions from a body of text? Like changing "I wasn't there" to "I was not there".
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2answers
60 views

Use of AMEX, MasterCard, Visa without the word “card”

Do you say my AMEX, my Visa Gold, my MasterCard to mean your credit cards issued by a relevant company? I always take (my) Visa Gold, when I go abroad on holiday. Will you accept AMEX (at a ...
3
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1answer
107 views

Technically, would the contraction “I'm” be a sentence? [duplicate]

Way back in high school, I asked my English teacher a question while we were on the topic of sentence fragments. If the words "I am." make a complete sentence, then would the contraction "I'm" be a ...
3
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3answers
135 views

Can I use a contraction with names or only with subject pronouns?

I have a doubt. Can I use this contraction? Karen and Tony've got a computer Instead of the full form of have got : Karen and Tony have got a computer Which one should I use? Or, are both ...
3
votes
2answers
103 views

Can “it's” be used as a question? [duplicate]

In my experience, people say "it's" in place of "it is," but never in the form of a question. I think the question "It's?" sounds awkward, but I'd like to know if it's grammatically correct. Is it? ...
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1answer
64 views

what is the reason ..we say can't? intead of can not [duplicate]

Numerous exceptions r there in English grammar ,why it is so? Like I m still confused between India HAS/HAVE won the match?
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1answer
227 views

Why is it “'s” after Let and before a verb, example “Let's go” or Let's do something"? [duplicate]

We often learn the structure “Let’s do something”, but why it there an apostrophe-s after let and before the verb? Why does we need ’s in this structure? Does ’s means is or does it mean was?
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1answer
317 views

Is the contraction of “and”, “'n'”, capitalized in a title?

Should it be, for example, "Fish 'n' Chips", or "Fish 'N' Chips"?
3
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0answers
83 views

Contraction of 'Am I not'? [duplicate]

To the best of my understanding the correct contraction of "Am I not" is "aren't I". However, growing up in Scotland I very frequently heard an alternative contraction "amn't I". I think this though ...
2
votes
3answers
168 views

Why did common contractions become common?

Examples: Real life isn't like that, y'know. Y'all are awesome. I dunno why. Where'd you go? This is my theory: these phrases/sentences have been said so many times that people ...
16
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4answers
848 views

Why can I contract *across* a word, skipping the word in the middle? [duplicate]

I wrote this sentence: Why wouldn't it be valid? --and I realized that without the contraction it becomes: Why would it not be valid? As opposed to "why would not it be valid," as the ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the English term for a word meaning a shortened/contracted version of itself? [duplicate]

I remember being taught this by my Literature teacher in school long ago but I can't remember the actual term, maybe complicated sounding like 'onomatopoeia'. I don't mean apostrophes e.g. wouldn't. ...
4
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1answer
122 views

Correct usage of *'ve contractions

Coincidentally over the last few days, I have twice seen what I view as an 'incorrect' use of I've, viz. How could I've done this better? On attempting to explain why this sounds wrong to a ...
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1answer
77 views

Can “you've” be used as a possessive “have”? [duplicate]

Generally, "you've" is used in conjunction with another verb, such as "I see you've arrived" or "She asked if you've seen this". Is it also acceptable to use "you've" without a second verb, using the ...
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2answers
109 views

Contraction of “There are” to “There're” [duplicate]

I'm a soon published author going through my final edit of the book and I got stuck thinking about this one. I understand that when writing this you should type in "There are". When people are saying ...
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3answers
1k views

It seems natural to say “who'd've” in speech, but is this incorrect?

It definitely seems strange in writing. All of the following make sense: who would have who'd have who would've But what about this? who'd've
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5answers
1k views

Etymology of “let us” and “let's”

The verb let means “allow”, “permit”, “not prevent or forbid”, “pass, go or come” and it's used with an object and the bare infinitive. Are you going to let me drive or not? Don't let ...
0
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1answer
3k views

Is it correct to shorten “you have” to “you've”? [closed]

If "you are" can be shortened to "you're", can "you have" be shortened to "you've"? Is it acceptable? If yes, what are the situations where it can be used?
0
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2answers
80 views

apostrophes and possession [duplicate]

So I was taught that I should use apostrophes when something possesses something else, but I'm not sure about the use of it's in the following situation: ...and they found their way to a castle. ...
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1answer
579 views

Why do we say won't instead of willn't? [duplicate]

If won't is the contraction of will not, where did the "wo" come from in won't? Why is this convention over willn't?
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1answer
125 views

Is there a contraction known as the're?

Recently, one of my relatives started studying the English Language and she came to discuss that the contraction of there are can also be written as the're because that's they way she learnt it at ...
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2answers
325 views

“I'd done…” vs “I had done…”

Is the former less common for native English speakers because it kinda sound like I done? I'm basing this assumption on Ngrams. But I may be wrong. Example sentences: Plus, I was ashamed to ...
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1answer
1k views

Bob's vs. Bobs? [closed]

Many of my friends use an apostrophe-S after a proper noun to conjoin the word with the word is. For example: "Bob's angry today." This does not make sense to me. I know that an apostrophe can ...
0
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1answer
64 views

Contraction Rampage [duplicate]

I don't see this getting used quite often, but is it alright to use chain contractions in essays, reports, letters, documents, etc.? I shouldn't've'd eaten that doughnut. They'll've a ...