A contraction is a shortened version of the written and spoken forms of a word, syllable, or word group, created by omission of internal letters.

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How to overcome confusion of contrasting word 2?

Actual sentence: Another surprising finding was the lack of any neurotic traits in the bonobos, even though these are widely found in other ape species. In this sentence, two contrasting ...
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2answers
20 views

How to overcome confusion of contrasting word?

Actual sentence- As a result, while patients are not being cured, the malaria parasite continues to spread further. My Explanation- This sentence seems to me wrong, because while is contrasting word,...
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1answer
17 views

How to comprehend a sentence with multiple contrasting word and commas?

Darwin’s influence on modern scientific inquiry is largely ......; yet while Darwin’s ideas inform fields as disparate as genetics and social psychology, one cannot help but think that each group, in ....
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69 views

“My name is” or “My name's” [closed]

Can you contract the verb to be in this case? "My name's", "his name's", "her name's".... sound a little bit off to me, or at least sounds very, very informal. Most important question is "is it ...
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2answers
176 views

When does `isn't …` expand to “is … not” and “is not …” [duplicate]

Recently I have been writing a chatbot, and in part of the process it expands contractions. While doing this, I have found odd behavior for the contraction "isn't". There are two different way to ...
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21 views

Are there such forms as this's and which's?

I've seen that's, who's, how's, etc., but I don't recall ever seeing this's and which's. Are they used very often or at all? If so, how do you pronounce them? Any differently from this is and which is?...
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2answers
48 views

When to use opening or closing single quotes

I've been discussing with a colleague which apostrophe/single quote to actually use in what situations. We've agreed to use the closing single quote ( ’ ) for possession. e.g. That’s his ...
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1answer
70 views

Is the sentence “I wonder where he's?” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

The sentence "I wonder where he is?" has no contraction and, in my opinion, feels like it naturally flows compared to using the contraction. Are there any rules that are violated with the contracted ...
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35 views

Capitalising Contractions [duplicate]

I couldn't really find anything on this, but it has been bugging me for a while. Say for example, you have the following dialogue: 'I'll let Mr. Hall know.' If you want to emulate "dropping the ...
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2answers
58 views

What are the contraction rules for noun such as Bob, tickets, concert, etc?

Ok, Here is the tricky ones. Googling "The concert's sold out" returns no result, whereas googling "The concert was sold out" returns a lot of result. Also, I don't see anyone say "the tickets're ...
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0answers
15 views

“been a watching”, “been a playing” - why? [duplicate]

I first encountered adding an "a" before a verb in songs in phrases such as "I've been a-playing". At first I thought that songwriters add it when they need one more syllable to make a verse sound ...
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2answers
103 views

Can we contract “well have” to “well've”?

Is the contraction of the term "well have" to "well've" grammatically correct? For example, can a sentence beginning "I may as well have . . . " be contracted to "I may as well've . . . "?
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1answer
82 views

Is apostrophe-s ('s) only for “is” and “has”? [closed]

I heard this dictation: "Well, we weren't sure. We were thinking the ride's going to start up again." As a stenographer, my job is to transcribe. If I were to turn "ride's" into two words, would this ...
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1answer
194 views

What does 's mean at the end of someone's name? [closed]

I understand 's means is and has, if 's is used at the end of a name, Does it mean is or has?Let's suppose Ex is a someone's name. Ex is object -it can mean Ex is an object, totally incorrect ...
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1answer
65 views

You cannot contract “there are”!!. Right or Wrong? [duplicate]

This website said You cannot contract "there are" Ex: There are nine cats on the roof. So, we can not say There're nine cats on the roof. right?
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9answers
9k views

How is y’all’dn’t’ve pronounced

According to Wikipedia, y’all’dn’t’ve is a valid contraction. I am having difficulty pronouncing the L-D-N-T-V consonant cluster, especially since there is no vowel at the end (silent E). Y’all’dn’t’...
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0answers
162 views

I wouldn't vs I'd not

I'm defending my word choice to an editor in a novel I've written. There are two points of view: one is a native Irish speaker, and the other, an American born and raised here. They're both eighteen. ...
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0answers
33 views

When “you're” is incorrect? [duplicate]

I saw a meme that said, "I'm smarter than you're." It obviously seems wrong (just from the context of the joke), but why? If you're = you are, then what makes such a construct grammatically incorrect ...
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2answers
56 views

What does “Mustn't've” mean? [closed]

This word is pretty confusing to me. Please explain. Does it mean must not have?
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2answers
3k views

Isn't a “gonner” or “gonna” slang for a person about to die?

(I think this "blank" moment of mine is what is called in AmEng a brain fart, so be it) Isn't ‘a gonner/gonna’ slang for a person who is about to die? It's said in situations where, potentially, ...
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1answer
56 views

does apropos have contradictory meanings? [closed]

Definitions: 1) with reference to; concerning. 2) very appropriate to a particular situation. 3) used to state a speaker's belief that someone's comments or acts are unrelated to any previous ...
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1answer
125 views

Contraction of “I was”?

Is there a contraction for "I was"? There are contractions for "I am" (I'm), "I will" (I'll), "I have" (I've), "I would" (I'd), and yet the simple past tense seems conspicuously missing. Why is ...
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0answers
32 views

Can the “ 'll ” contraction be used with nouns and proper nouns? [duplicate]

As the title suggests, is there a specific rule as such to be followed when using " 'll " in a contraction, especially with proper nouns/nouns. While I did find articles related to " 's", couldn't ...
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30 views

When contractions shouldn't be contractions [duplicate]

I was reading a comment that was made on SO that sounded strange to me [That feature] should've better support in [the] next version My first reaction to this was that it needs to be "should ...
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2answers
404 views

“Why didn't he” vs. “Why did not he”

I understand that [ didn't = did not]. But is it correct to write the following? Why didn't he come to work? Why did not he come to work? And can it be written as follows? Why he didn't ...
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1answer
46 views

Do more contractions always mean more informality?

As my limited experience in English indicates, more contractions are used in spoken English than in written. Moreover, too many contractions favor casualness. Compare: I would not have come. I ...
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3answers
111 views

Does a contraction allow for the use of a preposition at the end of a sentence?

Does a contraction allow for the use of a preposition at the end of a sentence? Take the following sentence, for example: Where is it at (not correct grammar) and Where's it at? (unknown) You ...
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2answers
720 views

“He Isn't”/“She Isn't” V.S. “He's Not”/“She's Not” [duplicate]

Is there a difference in usage between "he isn't"/"she isn't" and "he's not"/"she's not"?
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1answer
91 views

Contractions in odd Places [duplicate]

I understand contractions as just a means of merging two words into one, with some added punctuation, but there's some cases where I feel I'm grammatically correct, but using them incorrectly. For ...
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1answer
61 views

Is a word like 'thx' a contraction or abbreviation?

Putting aside that the use of 'thx' is bad, and it isn't really a word. Would 'thx' be considered a contraction or abbreviation? Contraction: a shortened version of the written and spoken forms of a ...
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1answer
138 views

How to spell the contraction of “might as well”

I often say a word that sounds like "mares-well", as a contraction of "might as well". E.g. if someone said "shall I throw away this bread" I might say "you might as well, it's totally mouldy", except ...
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76 views

Exceptions to the rule that AAVE can omit “is” and “are” iff the corresponding form in standard English can be contracted?

According to Wikipedia: Only the forms is and are (of which the latter is anyway often replaced by is) can be omitted; am, was, and were are not deleted. These forms cannot be omitted when ...
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2answers
90 views

Is it correct to replace “what does” with “what's”?

I recently came across a sentence in a online publication that used apostrophe-"S" as replacement for "does". I was wondering; is this allowed? I only know "what's" as replacement for "what is". The ...
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1answer
93 views

Is there a term for removing contractions?

Is there an English verb for removing contractions from a body of text? Like changing "I wasn't there" to "I was not there".
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2answers
62 views

Use of AMEX, MasterCard, Visa without the word “card”

Do you say my AMEX, my Visa Gold, my MasterCard to mean your credit cards issued by a relevant company? I always take (my) Visa Gold, when I go abroad on holiday. Will you accept AMEX (at a ...
3
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1answer
139 views

Technically, would the contraction “I'm” be a sentence? [duplicate]

Way back in high school, I asked my English teacher a question while we were on the topic of sentence fragments. If the words "I am." make a complete sentence, then would the contraction "I'm" be a ...
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3answers
154 views

Can I use a contraction with names or only with subject pronouns?

I have a doubt. Can I use this contraction? Karen and Tony've got a computer Instead of the full form of have got : Karen and Tony have got a computer Which one should I use? Or, are both ...
3
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2answers
130 views

Can “it's” be used as a question? [duplicate]

In my experience, people say "it's" in place of "it is," but never in the form of a question. I think the question "It's?" sounds awkward, but I'd like to know if it's grammatically correct. Is it? ...
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1answer
65 views

what is the reason ..we say can't? intead of can not [duplicate]

Numerous exceptions r there in English grammar ,why it is so? Like I m still confused between India HAS/HAVE won the match?
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1answer
254 views

Why is it “'s” after Let and before a verb, example “Let's go” or Let's do something"? [duplicate]

We often learn the structure “Let’s do something”, but why it there an apostrophe-s after let and before the verb? Why does we need ’s in this structure? Does ’s means is or does it mean was?
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1answer
389 views

Is the contraction of “and”, “'n'”, capitalized in a title?

Should it be, for example, "Fish 'n' Chips", or "Fish 'N' Chips"?
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0answers
83 views

Contraction of 'Am I not'? [duplicate]

To the best of my understanding the correct contraction of "Am I not" is "aren't I". However, growing up in Scotland I very frequently heard an alternative contraction "amn't I". I think this though ...
2
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3answers
178 views

Why did common contractions become common?

Examples: Real life isn't like that, y'know. Y'all are awesome. I dunno why. Where'd you go? This is my theory: these phrases/sentences have been said so many times that people ...
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4answers
856 views

Why can I contract *across* a word, skipping the word in the middle? [duplicate]

I wrote this sentence: Why wouldn't it be valid? --and I realized that without the contraction it becomes: Why would it not be valid? As opposed to "why would not it be valid," as the ...
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2answers
2k views

What is the English term for a word meaning a shortened/contracted version of itself? [duplicate]

I remember being taught this by my Literature teacher in school long ago but I can't remember the actual term, maybe complicated sounding like 'onomatopoeia'. I don't mean apostrophes e.g. wouldn't. ...
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1answer
128 views

Correct usage of *'ve contractions

Coincidentally over the last few days, I have twice seen what I view as an 'incorrect' use of I've, viz. How could I've done this better? On attempting to explain why this sounds wrong to a ...
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1answer
87 views

Can “you've” be used as a possessive “have”? [duplicate]

Generally, "you've" is used in conjunction with another verb, such as "I see you've arrived" or "She asked if you've seen this". Is it also acceptable to use "you've" without a second verb, using the ...
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2answers
118 views

Contraction of “There are” to “There're” [duplicate]

I'm a soon published author going through my final edit of the book and I got stuck thinking about this one. I understand that when writing this you should type in "There are". When people are saying ...
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3answers
2k views

It seems natural to say “who'd've” in speech, but is this incorrect?

It definitely seems strange in writing. All of the following make sense: who would have who'd have who would've But what about this? who'd've
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5answers
2k views

Etymology of “let us” and “let's”

The verb let means “allow”, “permit”, “not prevent or forbid”, “pass, go or come” and it's used with an object and the bare infinitive. Are you going to let me drive or not? Don't let ...