A contraction is a shortened version of the written and spoken forms of a word, syllable, or word group, created by omission of internal letters.

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Contraction Rampage

I don't see this getting used quite often, but is it alright to use chain contractions in essays, reports, letters, documents, etc.? I shouldn't've'd eaten that doughnut. They'll've a ...
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1answer
45 views

Different ways of using <pronoun> + 'd + <verb> [closed]

I'm sorry the title makes little sense but I don't know how to phrase it differently. In a sentence like When I was a kid, I'd go to school every morning the 'd stands for I used to, right? ...
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2answers
75 views

the slang contraction of “what'd he” as in the sentence “what'd he come at you with”

What is the slang contraction of "What'd he" as in the sentence "What'd he come at you with"? "What'd he" is already a contraction but I mean in the same manner like whatcha = what're you=what've you, ...
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3answers
129 views

Was “Do not you want to know…” correct 200 years ago, and is now incorrect?

"Do not you want to know who has taken it?'' cried his wife impatiently. -Pride and Prejudice (1813) According to one of the answers in Is "Don't you know? " the same as ...
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1answer
49 views

Why are many English contractions considered okay to use in contraction-form, but believed to “sound wrong” when used individually? [duplicate]

Some popular examples: Don't you know any better? Now use that with out the contractions: Do not you know any better? Want to bet that many English speakers would find this weird or wrong ...
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0answers
60 views

Using “it's” instead of “it is” [duplicate]

I like the way contractions operate and I know the difference between "it's" and "its" based on contraction and possession. That is, "it's = it is" and "its" is possessive. However, there are some ...
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1answer
85 views

Is there a RULE (not opinion) for when it's okay to replace “is” with “'s”? [closed]

I wrote a sentence in which instead of saying, "God is" I said, "God's". Someone saw this and corrected me that I have to write "God is". This made me scared that I might not be able to simply ...
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2answers
61 views

Contractions of “have” in the sense of “to possess”

I see this usage frequently on various SE sites: I've an [object] This usage of "I've" seems very strange [edit: archaic or poetic] to me as a native speaker of US English. I'm accustomed to ...
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10answers
7k views

Grammatically correct sentence where “you're” and “your” can be interchanged? [closed]

Most grammar checkers are capable of detecting the the misuse of "your" and "you're"; providing the necessary correction. I'm curious though, is there any sentence that can be constructed where ...
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2answers
248 views

Space before apostrophe

In the 1928 Scribner’s (NY) edition of The Plays of J. M. Barrie, I’ve noticed an odd convention: where a contraction happens in middle of a word (e.g., “don’t” for “do n(o)t”), the apostrophe has the ...
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2answers
71 views

Can “very” (and its synonyms") mean less intense? [closed]

I recently found something mildly intriguing. Very should mean more than the following adjective. This room is dark Means that it is casually dark if you will. While This room is very dark ...
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1answer
122 views

’Tis the season

Google has a new doodle that says ’Tis the season when you put your cursor on it: What is the origin of this usage? or even the contraction ’tis? Details: There is a popular carol called “Deck ...
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4answers
378 views

Why do not we ask negative questions without a contraction on the not after the verb?

I have found multiple questions touching on this but not a single one that has a comprehensive answer. The information is all there but in little bits. "Do you not" vs. "Don't ...
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1answer
122 views

Using a name as a contraction with “is”, syntax looks possessive?

"Bob is fat" Would it be proper to do "Bob's fat"? To me, this looks possessive, as if we're talking about his fat rather than using "fat" as an adjective. What's the proper way to do this?
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1answer
46 views

How do you form the plural of an elided/contracted noun?

The noun, without elision, is "beatings". Singular, elided, is "beatin'" (note the apostrophe). So what's the plural? I considered "beatins'" (note the apostrophe) and "beatin's" but neither of them ...
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3answers
124 views

Using contractions in questions

I am very sure about the use of contractions in positive and negative sentences. But I am not sure about their use in questions. I've seen many examples of the use of contractions in questions, but I ...
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1answer
63 views

Usage of “tum” in English speaking countries, other than the UK

I'm sure I've heard tummy used in American English and the English spoken in commonwealth countries as a sort of euphemism for stomach. I'm not sure so much how common it is to hear it reduced to tum, ...
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1answer
55 views

History of assimilation for going to be

When did the assimilation of going to be into gonna be start being used?
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0answers
56 views

When is it acceptable to use “I've” by itself? [duplicate]

I have a friend from a foreign country who for years has used "I've" in a way that sounds funny to me. He often writes sentences like "I've an exam tomorrow." Is he correct in this usage? I have ...
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2answers
518 views

Are what-cha and arent-cha examples of elision?

Are these words examples of elision? What effect do they create? If a child says them what does this suggest about their language development? Thanks for any help!!
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2answers
176 views

I know “of” sounds like “ov”. Does “I've” sound like “If”?

I was studying connected speech and I read when we say for example I've finished my homework we pronounce the 've and f in finished as only one sound. Is it only in this case or whenever I ...
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0answers
81 views

Contracting “I should have” to “I'd've”

I know that for "I would have" the contraction "I’d have" or "I’d’ve" is a lot more frequently used in everyday conversation. But is the same true for "I should have"? Is "I’d've" also prefered?
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3answers
341 views

Contraction [SUBJECT] + is with proper noun ending in s?

The possessive form (the car of Jesus) would be Jesus' car. If we say Jesus is 11. Would it also be Jesus' 11? Jesus's 11?
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1answer
99 views

Contractions: Are “I would’ve” and “I’d have” both equally permissible?

Instead of “I would have done something”, are both of these versions ok? I would’ve done something. I’d have done something.
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1answer
634 views

When did “ain't” become slang?

In Anthony Trollope's The Way We Live Now, there are several places where "ain't" is used instead of "am not", such as: "I ain't afraid of him, if you mean that," continued Lord Nidderdale. — ...
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1answer
71 views

Nonstandard spellings for dialects

Are there standard ways of indicating dialect, as "I 'aven't," I asked 'is name," and especially "It couldn't 'a' 'appened." Can "have" be indicated with just "a"?
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1answer
47 views

Let us or Let's when demanding.

What to use when you are not exhorting a group and yourself to go, but demanding a third person to let you go? Can “Let's go! " also be used"or only “Let us go!"?
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3answers
85 views

Contractions regarding the word 'it'

My question is: Is there a contraction for the phrase 'it was'? Would this contraction be 't'was'? - Thanks
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2answers
1k views

Shalln't vs. Shan't in British English

I am a British English speaker and often use "shall" and "shall not". When I contract "shall not", I pronounce it [ʃɑlnt] -- that is, the "l" sound remains. My question, therefore, is how do I spell ...
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1answer
54 views

Apostrophe usage in “your order's been dispatched”

Your order's been dispatched. Is this contraction (not to indicate plural, but as a contraction of "order has") correct? Or would it be better to just simply write: Your order has been ...
11
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3answers
496 views

Expanding a contraction, where the expansion is not as it would seem

Consider these two sentences, one with a contraction, one without: I didn't check my voicemail. I did not check my voicemail. didn't is expanded to did not. Now consider: Why didn't ...
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1answer
430 views

We'll vs well used in this sentence? [closed]

Is We'll or well used here: _, that works. _, I've never done that before.
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1answer
447 views

meaning and use of “gotta” [closed]

I often heard people say the word "gotta". I have read in this web site that gotta is a contraction of "I have got to" and that that phrase means "must", is my understanding correct? Regarding the ...
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1answer
155 views

Does “it'll've” exist, and if not, why not? [duplicate]

From what I can glean, it'll and I've exist as standard contractions, but I am unsure of whether it'll've either exists or is acceptable. "It will have" should be able to be reduced to "it'll've", ...
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1answer
306 views

Are “kinda”, “sorta”, “oughta” and “sposta” acceptable in formal writing?

I get that sorta, kinda, sorta-kinda (this one I quite like though) oughta and sposta imitate speech but it still annoys me to find them "in print", especially when the overall tone is formal. ...
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3answers
127 views

How prevalent is this reversal of “yes” and “no”? [duplicate]

Example: Aren't you going to the store? Where I am from, the correct answer indicating I am going to the store is yes. The contraction "not" is ignored. Is this sort of confusion prevalent ...
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1answer
179 views

Is this a portmanteau, contraction, or perhaps both?

I have chosen to edit this post because it apparently has offended some of the more sensitive among us. While, personally, I feel this should prompt discourse rather than down votes, I do not wish to ...
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2answers
18k views

“He doesn't” vs “He don't” [duplicate]

Grammatically, for he/she/it we use "does" or "doesn't" like in, He doesn't eat meat. but these days I'm observing the usage of the above sentence(especially in American movies) like this, ...
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1answer
5k views

Is “mine's” a valid contraction?

Not mines, but mine's (mine is). As in, "You cooked a good turkey, but mine's better."
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2answers
1k views

Correct way to spell “young'un”? [closed]

As slang, this phrase: Since I was a young'un... Is there an accepted way to abbreviate the last word there?
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4answers
162 views

Can “was” be abbreviated as “'s?”

Is it possible to write "'s" instead of "was" in a sentence or is completely wrong? For example: She was at home yersterday. She's at home yesterday.
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1answer
4k views

When were st, nd, rd, and th, first used [closed]

When were numeric contractions for ordinals first used, as in 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 6th instead of first, second, third, sixth?
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3answers
179 views

Is it acceptable to use “math” in an admissions essay?

I am writing a college admissions essay and would like to get a professional opinion on whether it is acceptable to use the truncated and informal version of the word "mathematics" as "math". I ask ...
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2answers
233 views

Why does the contraction of “I will” sound strange in certain sentence constructions? [duplicate]

Recently, while chatting with a friend via text, my friend asked me, "Can you ask them tomorrow?" I responded with: I will when I go. It occurred to me when writing this response that it would ...
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2answers
310 views

Is there an exception to the prohibition against ending a sentence with “ ’s ” at work here?

The ’s can be used as a contraction representing a weak, unstressed word that is not pronounced. It allegedly cannot occur in sentence final position. She is not ready, but he is. She’s not ...
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1answer
335 views

What does “a'me” mean?

Only boss a'me, is me. What is the meaning of "a'me" in the above sentence?
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4answers
1k views

What does “on’ry” mean in “I Wonder As I Wander”?

During a running debate or whether I Wonder as I Wander qualifies as a Christmas Carol, I looked up the lyrics. The first verse: I wonder as I wander out under the sky How Jesus the Saviour ...
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1answer
614 views

Why does the word “never” not contain an apostrophe?

If never is a contraction of 'not ever' why does it not have an apostrophe, i.e. why is it not written n'ever rather than never? I can understand that the apostrophe has simply fallen out of use, but ...
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2answers
193 views

Conjunction contraction - second “a” and “at”

Which one is correct? Or are both acceptable? *He earned an MD and a gold medal from St James for his dissertation. *He earned an MD and gold medal from St James for his dissertation. *He was ...
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3answers
330 views

Is this the right way to use “wouldn't”?

I apologize if this is a duplicate or anything for that matter but I didn't locate any questions on it. I have this phrase I wrote and it is confusing me a little bit. An OAHU Agent can help at ...