Conjunctions are words used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause, such as "and," "but," and "if."

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“It was great because of improving my English.”

"It was great because of improving my English." A non-native speaker produced this sentence recently in a piece of writing, “it” being an English language course that she had attended a few years ...
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2answers
89 views

“With all that said” in spoken English, contradict or not?

I know "with that said" or "that being said" or "having said that" can be used as an alternative to "though" in written English, to introduce something that will contradict what has been previously ...
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such as something vs. such something as

The original one: From the view point of outstanding teachers such as John... From the view point of such outstanding teachers as John ... From the view point of outstanding teachers such John as... ...
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Which word(s) does “nuclear” modify in “by nuclear action or radiation or radioactive contamination”

Is the word nuclear assumed after the "or" in the following sentence? "by nuclear action or radiation or radioactive contamination" In other words, does the or assume that the nuclear applies to ...
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Clause applying to first part of sentence when 'and' is used?

The requirement referred to in the first subparagraph shall not apply to fund of funds structures and master-feeder structures where the underlying funds have a depositary which provides ownership ...
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197 views

'but' for contrast and 'but' for opposition

'But' does not mean the same thing in "I like pop music but my parents like classical music." and in "My parents have played a lot of classical music to me but I still don't like it." What is it ...
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29 views

Does the word “too” in a series of items decide the placement of the conjunction?

Original: A boy, a girl and a dog too went for a walk. Would the original or the following be better, or does it change the meaning? A boy and a girl, and a dog too went for a walk. Is ...
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54 views

Syntax of “not only” + “furthermore”

Can I use not only with furthermore instead of also? Not only is he tall, he is also heavy. Can I say or write: Not only is he tall, he is furthermore heavy. or (and please tell me if this ...
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48 views

In my example, can I use a comma before the word “thus”?

Graph 4 improves Graph 3 because it shows potentially similar outliers that occur at each birthday, thus this represents our best range of x.
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311 views

Using the FANBOYS “for” in a series

I have a sentence that is constructed the same as this one: She bought food for a black cat, a white horse, a red dog, and a green frog. However, I feel the comma does not give enough pause for ...
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79 views

Pesky 'that' removal - what is this construction generally known as?

Recently seen: There is an expression I think comes from ... Others have told me (that) such a construction is wrong, but I am sure (that) it is OK. An editor decided it was grammatically ...
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How should “vice versa” be conjoined to a negative prase that uses “cannot”?

In a passage of proposed programming language documentation I was reading today, I came across this sentence: Strings cannot directly be compared with binary sequences, and vice versa! The "and" ...
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Capitalising “for” depending on the usage in the title?

Prepositions are not capitalised in titles. Subordinate conjunctions are capitalised. The word “for”, as per Oxford, is mostly a preposition but can also be a conjunction (I assume subordinating ...