Conjunctions are words used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause, such as "and," "but," and "if."

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Compound-Complex Comma Usage

I couldn't find this question on here, and I've tried scouring the Internet, but to no avail. It's quite possible I'm just not searching with the appropriate keywords. The question is regarding comma ...
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use of a comma before the conjunction “plus”

Sweet children enjoy sprinkles on top of ice cream sundaes, plus the syrups at the bottom of the dish. Would this be correct without the comma?
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Position of conjunctions: Beginning of a sentence Vs Near beginning of a sentence

When should one use conjunctions, such as "therefore" and "nevertheless," at each of the following positions: Beginning of a sentence Near beginning of a sentence. For example: She is to give ...
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Parallelism using “as,” “nor,” “or,” and “neither… nor”

Am I using correct parallelism in the following sentence? They say the place where you are born is not a choice, as it is not the family into which you are born. If the above sentence uses correct ...
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Using 'or' twice in a sentence

Can I use 'or' twice in this sentence? I don’t know whether it was a last-minute programme or they didn’t get information about the programme or the school did not get to inform the parents on ...
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It is correct to put 'But' before 'Despite of'?

I want to write: But despite of this....... Is putting two conjunctions together not necessary? Or would it be fine to have them both together right up close next to each other.
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Clause applying to first part of sentence when 'and' is used?

The requirement referred to in the first subparagraph shall not apply to fund of funds structures and master-feeder structures where the underlying funds have a depositary which provides ownership ...
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'but' for contrast and 'but' for opposition

But does not mean the same thing in I like pop music but my parents like classical music. and in My parents have played a lot of classical music to me but I still don't like it. What is ...
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When do I need to have a preposition before whether?

I often see prepositions that come before whether and I feel that most of the time these prepositions are unnecessary. I'm confused as to whether a preposition is required before whether. I ...
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Can “as well as” be a conjunction?

Can as well as be a conjunction that connects two independent sentences? The reference to the relevant rules and similar threads would be much appreciated. The training program will be introduced ...
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Is “and” used correctly in this sentence? How does it change the meaning if I remove it?

It's hard for me to figure out why the writer uses "and" in the end of the following sentence. Like "and of which we and those who come after us have a right to be proud." "It is no good talking ...
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Usage of “;” . Can it connect verb phrases without conjunctions?

I know ";" can connect related sentences without any conjunctions. Now I wonder if ";" can also connect verb phrases as follow: The device calculates ....; selects ....; programs....; and changes... ...
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Tense of verb after conjunction

Jumping straight into my question, consider these two sentences: He had finished the recitation and closed the book. He had finished the recitation and had closed the book. Which of the above two ...
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'For while …, yet …' : Right quantity and use of conjunctions?

For while the capacity to overcome all opposing sensible impulses can and must be simply presupposed in man on account of his freedom, yet this capacity as strength is something he must acquire. ...
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SAT Writing Question

Upon considering the facts of the case; he quickly made a decision and sent the police. A. When he considered B. Considering C. Upon Considering D. When Considering Hello everyone, I ...
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He stayed while she talked / was talking to her?

He stayed while she talked to her. He waited while she was talking to her. Are both correct? What is the difference?
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Using “since” instead of “because”

I want to use the word since as because, but I don't know if I can add the word 'then' after it. For example, is the sentence 'since we have A and B, then there is no need for you to get C' correct? ...
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Are there resources that connect the multiple meanings of “as”?

Respecting this answer, This is often the cases when one reads dictionary definitions but in fact, it's not very difficult to see the connections. the semantic field of 'as' is actually quite ...
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Why no conjunctions between adverbial phrases/clauses when able to be confused with adjective phrase?

Thank you for the kind comments and answers regrading the adverbial phrase of place. But what I don't understand is how they can be used without a conjunction in some cases. For example: 1 He ...
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Is “posit Pluto not a planet” a valid rendering of “posit that Pluto is not a planet”?

The fragment "posit Pluto not a planet" is particularly awkward, but would "posit tomato a fruit" or "posit tomatoes as fruits" be any better as a rendering of "posit that tomatoes are fruits"?
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How to use conjunction in an object clause?

Is it OK to use comma space followed by "whereas" in an object clause like the following sentence? Experiments showed that H and K cells were highly sensitive to sugar, whereas P cells were ...
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The text will be read only once …listen carefully

I came across the following sentence in a test and I need to fill in it with correct conjunction , it could be coordinating, adverbial or subordinating conjunction. It looks like the word so fits well ...
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“That” in a noun clause — omittable or not

I know (that) "that" is omittable in a clause following verbs like say, think, know etc., but if there are two clauses in the same sentence led by the verb, is it true that the second "that" is not ...
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Distributive property of 'and' for a set

If I did 'x' for two years and then did 'y' for one year, can I correctly say that I did 'x' and 'y' for 3 years? Or would that be false since I hadn't done 'y' for more than one year? Would it be ...
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Is this use of “but also” grammatically correct and used in the right context?

"Personally I enjoy typing on my computer more than writing. I think it's because I don't have very good handwriting but also because my thoughts spring up faster than I could ever write but with ...
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“But from” or “But rather from”?

Which one is more grammatically correct? But from or But rather from? I don't quite understand which one should be used. And I seriously doubt that the second one can be used at all. It didn't ...
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Subordinating Conjunctions and Conjunctive adverbs

Is there way to identify which words are Subordinating Conjunctions and which are Conjunctive adverbs, or do we need to memorize it? Both seems similar to me Subordinating Conjunctions: Although, ...
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Conjunctions or Interrupting phrase

Are both correct and are their meanings the same? This is the reason, therefore, that you should buy the house. This is the reason; therefore, you should buy the house. One is interrupting phrase, ...
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singular or plural noun after connecting two or more things by and

I was writing an email and there was a sentence PersonA has joined t1, t2 and t3 teams My question is should it be teams or team and the end? What is the rule of thumb?
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'before' vs. 'until'

Which is more appropriate? I had lived in New York for three years until/before I graduated from college. Perhaps, there may be a more appropriate expression, but if you have to use either of ...
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Should there be a space before and after an ampersand when writing numerals?

How should one write "one and two" in short form - 1&2 or 1 & 2? Are there any particular rules regarding this? In context: You may choose to do Information Technology Units [1&2/1 ...
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Replacing “and” with comma

EB size and structure is known to influence differentiation potential, and the microwell system provides a robust, efficient method of producing EBs of any size or shape. I've seen many sentences ...
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“There is” or “There are” followed by a conjunction

I recently wrote the expression: There is a X in Y and a Z in W... When I received the galley proof on the paper in which I wrote this, it had been changed to: There are a X in Y and a Z in ...
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A question on the use of 'since'.

'Since' means throughout the period from a specified point in past time to the present. Can I use it to mean 'throughout the period from a specified point in past time to a specific point also in the ...
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Ending a clause with “but”

In an office email, I am trying to write a qualifying clause while leading into an exception to that clause in the same sentence. While this is an office email, and therefore informality is somewhat ...
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Conjunction confusion

folks. I'm back again with another grammatical quandary. I recently encountered this statement: "...cuts to the bone and through the heart.", which I called into question in a strictly anatomical ...
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How should “vice versa” be conjoined to a negative prase that uses “cannot”?

In a passage of proposed programming language documentation I was reading today, I came across this sentence: Strings cannot directly be compared with binary sequences, and vice versa! The "and" ...
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Capitalising “for” depending on the usage in the title?

Prepositions are not capitalised in titles. Subordinate conjunctions are capitalised. The word “for”, as per Oxford, is mostly a preposition but can also be a conjunction (I assume subordinating ...