Conjunctions are words used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause, such as "and," "but," and "if."

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such as something vs. such something as

The original one: From the view point of outstanding teachers such as John... From the view point of such outstanding teachers as John ... From the view point of outstanding teachers such John as... ...
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68 views

Clause applying to first part of sentence when 'and' is used?

The requirement referred to in the first subparagraph shall not apply to fund of funds structures and master-feeder structures where the underlying funds have a depositary which provides ownership ...
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320 views

'but' for contrast and 'but' for opposition

'But' does not mean the same thing in "I like pop music but my parents like classical music." and in "My parents have played a lot of classical music to me but I still don't like it." What is it ...
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107 views

Until, till, as long as

I will not go to the garden until my mother allows me I will not go to the garden as long as my mother doesn't allow me I will not go to the garden till my mother allows me: Are these sentences the ...
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150 views

Syntax of “not only” + “furthermore”

Can I use not only with furthermore instead of also? Not only is he tall, he is also heavy. Can I say or write: Not only is he tall, he is furthermore heavy. or (and please tell me if this ...
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58 views

Determining if “than” is used as conjunction or preposition

"than" can be used as a conjunction and as a preposition. I want to be able to tell for any given sentence containing "than" which grammatical function it has in that sentence. My current ...
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30 views

“in addition” in the middle of a sentence

Which one is correct? X, in addition to Y, is the main reason that ... X, in addition to Y, are the main reasons that ...
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60 views

Ending a clause with “but”

In an office email, I am trying to write a qualifying clause while leading into an exception to that clause in the same sentence. While this is an office email, and therefore informality is somewhat ...
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75 views

Conjunction confusion

folks. I'm back again with another grammatical quandary. I recently encountered this statement: "...cuts to the bone and through the heart.", which I called into question in a strictly anatomical ...
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61 views

How should “vice versa” be conjoined to a negative prase that uses “cannot”?

In a passage of proposed programming language documentation I was reading today, I came across this sentence: Strings cannot directly be compared with binary sequences, and vice versa! The "and" ...
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Capitalising “for” depending on the usage in the title?

Prepositions are not capitalised in titles. Subordinate conjunctions are capitalised. The word “for”, as per Oxford, is mostly a preposition but can also be a conjunction (I assume subordinating ...