Conjunctions are words used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause, such as "and," "but," and "if."

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meaning of “yet” “as if”

I don't understand the second part of this sentence: The Berlin Congress of 1878 and the first set of frontiers drawn on maps ignored key components of local life, and yet they were drawn as ...
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Starting a sentence with “And so” in a mathematical proof

Inspired by this question, I thought of something more. As Tim says, and I ageree, one more often sees repeated use of "Hence", "Therefore" etc. in a mathematical proof, and not very often do people ...
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A relative adverb or a conjunction or both?

I am not familiar with the idea that an adverb can function as a conjunction at the same time. Here are a couple of sentences that are confusing me. This is the reason why she left him. ...and ...
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260 views

Example for “so” as a subordinating conjunction

On a webpage called Daily Writing Tips there is a list of 25 subordinating conjunctions including so. The example they're giving is this: “So sure were you of your theory about them, you ignored ...
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Are “should” and “if” interchangeable at the beginning of a sentence? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: A special use of “should”? If "should" comes at the beginning of a sentence, and the sentence is not a question, then can it be replaced with "if?" Is there any ...
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“He has a PS4 and an Xbox One” or “he has a PS4 and Xbox One”?

Which one is grammatically correct? If both are correct, in what context is either used?
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30 views

In my example, can I use a comma before the word “thus”?

Graph 4 improves Graph 3 because it shows potentially similar outliers that occur at each birthday, thus this represents our best range of x.
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The suffix -hood

I am using the suffix -hood as both base and suffix to derive poetical meaning in an interplay of the words "...child and adult hood." Though this may offend the ear of the modern day reader, I ...
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“Appointed as” or just “appointed”?

Is it more correct to say a) John was appointed as manager of ACME. or b) John was appointed manager of ACME. Or are they interchangeable?
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“Whether or not” vs. “whether”

This will depend on whether he's suitable for the job. This will depend on whether he's suitable for the job or not. This will depend on whether or not he's suitable for the job. ...
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It the phrase “They identify themselves as Pacifist, but the EU as an arrogant power” grammatical?

Is this phrase grammatical? They identify themselves as Pacifist, but the EU as an arrogant power. Is a verb necessary in the second part of the sentence?
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Usage of 'and' between more than two items

Beijing will face trade sanctions from the United States, which brought the case, and the European Union and Japan. vs Beijing will face trade sanctions from the United States, which brought ...
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Where to place “to” in sentence: What we do, where it starts, and to where it often leads

My former grammar professors would say: "Use 'where' to mean a 'place' only if the reference to a certain place is obvious." In this case, "where" means a condition or situation. Help!
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Using a comma before “but”

I was once told by an English professor that a comma should never be used before but in a sentence. For years, I have followed her advice but sometimes I just feel like it just needs to be there. On ...
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3k views

“Though” vs. “although”

Can we use though and although interchangeably? Somebody told me that the difference is that though cannot be used at the beginning of a sentence. Is that the rule?
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1answer
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“Though”, “even though” and “although”

I do want to know what is the difference between these three conjunctions. Are there any differences? "Though" vs. "Even though" vs. "Although"
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How do you make the possessive form with “He and I”-style subjects?

Despite being a native speaker of American English, I cannot find a construction that sounds natural when trying to form a possessive from coordinated subjects including a first person pronoun, like ...
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2answers
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Can I use “therefore”, “so”, “hence” and “thus” interchangeably?

I was taught that, at least, 'therefore' and 'so' and can be used interchangeably, one being informal, the other formal. But, even when written, replacing 'so' with 'therefore' doesn't seem correct. ...
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1answer
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Difference between conjunctions and prepositions

Conjunctions are usually defined as words that join words, clauses or sentences together. Prepositions are defined as expressing relations between parts of a sentence. However, by expressing ...
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“If this, and if that.” With or without Comma?

I’ll appreciate it if you wash the car, and if you take out the trash. Should I use a comma before and, or not?
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Can “as” ever properly mean “because”?

We often encounter as used to mean because. As we know, as is not merely ambiguous: it’s hexiguous or octiguous. I’m especially uncomfortable when I find the usage in a technical paper1, where ...
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How to punctuate combinations of 'and' and 'or'

For this question, please bear in mind that or denotes [[either or both]]. I need to express that Mary will go to the movies with, either one of, or both of, Jane and John. Jane or John and Mary ...
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Do subordinating conjunctions subordinate clauses with verbs only?

While in Rome, John took a lot of pictures. While he was in Rome, John took a lot of pictures. Although on vacation, John calls the office often. Although he is on vacation, John calls the ...
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Is it possible to get real property from the phrase “real and tangible personal property”?

My understanding from the research that I have done on the phrase "real and tangible personal property is has follows: Real and tangible are adjectives and is a conjunction that puts together ...
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Can I start a text with “While”?

I know it’s OK to start sentences with While, but is it OK to start a text with it? For example: While electron-electron correlations and interactions are crucial in the descriptions of atoms and ...
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Why is the sentence “She sighed, and began whispering again” grammatically incorrect?

That's a line from a Twilight book. It's a grammar mistake pointed out by this website. She sighed, and began whispering again. I don't see anything wrong with it. Is the comma the mistake?
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Two imperative clauses joined by coordinating conjunction taken as a conditional

I would be inclined to parse the sentence "Nobody move and nobody get hurt" as two commands: Nobody move. Nobody get hurt. In other words, this is equivalent to "Nobody move or get hurt" (for ...
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Would you possibly elaborate your explanations? [closed]

Mary doesn’t play the piano well and nor does Alex. Mary doesn’t play the piano well. Nor does Alex. Are they the same? and which one do you use? ......................................... Now, ...
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Is it grammatically sound to group nouns/verbs sharing a preposition that governs the same object using an “and” multiple times in one sentence?

For example, does the below sentence violate any grammar rules? "Global Connections" will be showcasing internship opportunities, job openings and training programs at, challenges and issues facing, ...
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If you're starting a sentence with “and” or another conjunction, must you follow the conjunction with a comma?

When I was a kid, I was always told that starting a sentence off with "and" was improper. However, now it seems as if the consensus amongst members of the English cartel is that it is totally ...
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problem about “that” / a conjunction? or r.pronoun?

I've a problem in the following text, please help me. A shroud is a piece of cloth that a dead person's body is wrapped in before it is buried. my problem is- is shroud a proper noun? And what ...
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175 views

“And” vs. “or” when specifying a collection

If I am looking for one or more of A/B/C, but nothing else, and I want to tell that to somebody, do I say "I am only looking for A, B, and C" or "I am only looking for A, B, or C"? An example with ...
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Does “either A or B ” preclude “both A and B”?

In mathematics, "A or B" includes "A and B". Does "either" mean "A or B but not (A and B)" or does it include the possibility of "A and B"? The context might be mathematics, formal logic or ordinary ...
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When should you use “then” and when “than”?

As far as I know, then is used in a conjunction and in time-related sentences; than in all other cases. I believe that these are correct: Because I'm older than she, I should be the first chosen; I ...
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Should I Use a Comma before the Second “and”

Please enter your email and password, and click on the “Log In” button. Should I use a comma before the second “and”?
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“All but” idiom has two meanings?

Here's two ways I've seen the "all, but" idiom used: "Close all tabs but this one" (Any modern application with a number of tabs might have this as an option.) It means "close all the tabs, but not ...
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Alternative structures for “not only … but also …”?

I'm trying to write this essay and I find myself writing too many "not only ... but also ..." structures. Can you guys help me come up with some alternatives? Basically, I want this kind of ...
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Past Perfect sentences with “before”

I had seen a documentary on the Whydah before we visited it in Providence. Sir Francis Drake had worked for the British Navy before he became a pirate. These two sentences seem quite awkward to ...
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When to use & instead of “and”

Are there rules of usage when using the ampersand "&" instead of "and"? Are they completely interchangeable? The ampersand seems more casual, but I'm not sure.
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is there a rule that simple coordinator “and” is changed for “or” in negations?

For instance: Sally can play the guitar and the piano. Martin can't play the guitar or the piano.
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Should I use a comma in this sentence?

I am trying to teach myself punctuation rules. I have this sentence: The Disney version generally considered both racist and sexist portrayed the female characters in stereotypical roles and ...
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Difference between “which” and “that” as subordinate conjunctions [duplicate]

What are the differences between their meanings if one use them as conjunctions? Should they be used in separate cases?
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1answer
60 views

Comma in “still is, and will always remain”

Manchester United still is and will always remain a force despite these setbacks. Do I need a comma after is here? I personally don't think so but would like to be sure.
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1answer
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Comma before “and that” in a compound object

You should have known that he is quite adept at what he does and that he has the best conversion rate. You should have known that he is quite adept at what he does, and that he has the best ...
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“Maybe one of A or C cheated” — is this correct?

I want to express an assertion that A cheated or C cheated. Can I say: Maybe one of A or C cheated. Maybe one of A and C cheated. Or is neither correct?
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Should I put a comma before the last item in a list?

Should I put a comma before last item in list? I would like crackers, cheese and some soda. I would like crackers, cheese, and some soda.
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2answers
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“Thus” vs. “so” in formal English

Currently there are about 4000 international students from 110 different nations across the world, thus/so the university offers perfect conditions for socializing and making new friends. Is this ...
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Using “as much as” at start of sentence

Is it correct to use "as much as" at the start of the sentence? For example: As much as I like cricket, I like football. Is it correct? I didn't find any reference which suggest to use it that ...