Conjunctions are words used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause, such as "and," "but," and "if."

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Using “the/a/an” with “and” and “or” [duplicate]

Suppose I need to mention two nouns in a phrase so that they are joined with either "and" or "or". Do I use "the/a/an" with the both of the nouns or just with the first one?
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32 views

Syntax of “not only” + “furthermore”

Can I use not only with furthermore instead of also? Not only is he tall, he is also heavy. Can I say or write: Not only is he tall, he is furthermore heavy. or (and please tell me if this ...
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1answer
25 views

What is the grammatical role of a word like “Thus” at the beginning of a sentance [closed]

What is the grammatical role of a word like "Thus", "Therefore", or "So" at the start of a sentance? I was born in the US. "Therefore" I am an American citizen. It's not an article... it's not a ...
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4answers
351 views

Is it grammatical to split either/or into different sentences?

I came across the following sentence in Wikipedia: The bitangent lines can be constructed either by constructing the homothetic centers, as described at that article, and then constructing the ...
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17 views

What's the correct usage? [duplicate]

Would it be "people like us", or "people like we?" For instance, When we arrived at the party we immediately noticed that there were many people like we/us!
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47 views

Trouble understanding the meaning of sentences with “unless” [closed]

I am having trouble understanding the meaning of sentences using unless. Here is an example: Unless I hear from you by 6pm Friday I will send the letters to main office. What does the above ...
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7answers
2k views

When did “while” and “whilst” become interchangeable?

I think most folk happily use either "while" or "whilst". I've a vague recollection that at one time "while" indicated the passing of time and "whilst" was essentially the same as "whereas" or ...
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1answer
145 views

Is it correct to join two complete sentences with a comma without coordinating conjunction?

1) If, for whatever reason, you don’t think the quoted price is legitimate, please kindly inform us of your target price. Our sales teams would be glad to work around your budget. 2) If, for whatever ...
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237 views

“I'm going to help you like I promised.” Good English? Informal? Only colloquially acceptable? Wrong? [duplicate]

I've often heard this kind of sentence where one substitutes the conjunction "like" for "as". Is it acceptable in written English? Is it considered wrong in spoken English?
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1answer
59 views

Using a comma before “and we already have a toaster.” [duplicate]

Which of the following is correct? No gifts please, we don't need any orchids and we already have a toaster. No gifts please, we don't need any orchids , and we already have a toaster.
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What parts of speech are the most, and least, susceptible to linguistic change? And why? [migrated]

What parts of speech are the most susceptible, and the least susceptible, to linguistic change? And why? I would think that nouns are the most susceptible, and that closed word classes, such as ...
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2answers
497 views

Can “;” be used to replace the word “but”?

Are these two sentences both correct and equivalent? People say stuff like "all lawyers are liars", but it's not true. People say stuff like "all lawyers are liars"; it's not true. Is ...
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2answers
45 views

Different from x Different to x Different than [duplicate]

In the following sentence: "When I visited my old school after so many years, it looked completely different in the classrooms and the backyard /from what/to what/than/ it had been when I was a ...
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2answers
107 views

“as to + verb” vs “to + verb”

Are there any differences between these two forms? Example: "It has been done so as + to make it easier for academics and other judges to refer to a particular passage in a judicial ...
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2answers
284 views

Is it grammatical to introduce a result clause using “then”?

Is it grammatical to introduce a result clause by using then as in these examples: Don’t be lazy – then you will fail. Don’t kill him – then you will regret it. If so, then is the then in these ...
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1answer
59 views

Correct use of “albeit”, particularly with regard to commas

I’m not quite sure that the following sentence is gramatically correct. If it is, I wonder where I should put the comma or commas in the sentence using albeit. Obesity rates amongst men, whose ...
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5answers
5k views

Using “And” at the beginning of a sentence

Since I first learned English, I have been holding this understanding that "and", as a conj. but unlike "but", can only connect two clauses, not two sentences ended with periods. But recently, I ...
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2answers
36 views

Clause applying to first part of sentence when 'and' is used?

The requirement referred to in the first subparagraph shall not apply to fund of funds structures and master-feeder structures where the underlying funds have a depositary which provides ownership ...
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129 views

What does “v.” stand for? [closed]

In in the following sentence, what does the "v." stand for? The new system was partially indebted to Stanley v. Georgia Does it mean "Stanley and Georgia" or "Stanley against Georgia"?
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398 views

Can “nor” be used without “neither”?

I came across this sentence: Cummings Motors, Smith Electric nor our subcontractors can be held liable. Is this a proper use of the word nor? I can understand Neither Cummings Motors nor ...
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3answers
195 views

“due to A or due to B” is the same as “due to A or B”?

I found "due to A or due to B" in a book. Can I use "due to A or B" instead of "due to A or due to B"? If so, which one is better?
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2answers
282 views

Should I use a comma in written instructions?

I'm writing a technical user guide for a piece of software and am not sure whether I should be using a comma or not when giving instructions. Which of the following is correct? To add a new item ...
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2answers
59 views

Order of pronouns and proper names in a sentence

Which is correct? Because he reads, Bob knows a lot. or: Because Bob reads, he knows a lot. Assuming the former, the follow-up question is, what happens with "when", "as", "after" and ...
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57 views

Comma before “and so”

I encountered the following two examples: Moreover, the proposed scheme is designed in an ID-based setting and so the necessity for certificates and some related problems are eliminated. Our ...
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4answers
11k views

When should we use “and” and/or “and/or”?

What's the difference between "and" and "and/or"? How do we decide whether to use one or the other? Note: Also it would be great if someone could explain how do we actually pronounce "and/or" ...
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139 views

Starting a sentence with two subordinating conjunctions

Is it grammatical to start a sentence with two subordinating conjunctions? For example: Because if it rains tomorrow, I will get wet, I hoped for a sunny day. It seems wrong to start a sentence ...
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2answers
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Necessity of “that” as a conjunction

A simple Google search reveals that the word that can be used in many ways: as a pronoun, determiner, adverb and conjunction. I'm wondering about its usage specifically as a conjunction. Take the ...
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1answer
146 views

Does this sentence have too many subjunctives?

Does this sentence have too many subjunctives? If it please the king, let it be decreed that they be destroyed, and I will pay 10,000 talents of silver into the hands of those who have charge ...
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20 views

“Due to” vs. ”Because of” [duplicate]

I would please like to know which of the following sentences is the more accurate, and why that is so: Due to recent economic problems, it has been difficult for many to find a job. Because of ...
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1answer
34 views

Using “respectively” with “and” vs. “or”

Is it acceptable usage to use "or" with "respectively", or is it possible only with "and"? Example: If the light changes from red to blue or from blue to red, you must catch or throw the ball, ...
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15answers
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Should I put a comma before the last item in a list?

Should I put a comma before last item in list? I would like crackers, cheese and some soda. I would like crackers, cheese, and some soda.
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1answer
56 views

Why would you call “before” a preposition when it precedes a clause?

I'm new here & don't know all the etiquette & ins & outs, but I have a question about something posted in another thread. Modern grammar, however, recognises that prepositions can take ...
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1answer
8k views

“so long as” vs. “as long as”

I just googled the difference between as long as and so long as. The difference has alredy been discussed here. There are, it seems, two contexts for these expressions: lengths and physical ...
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3answers
287 views

Which word(s) can be used to express causal relation in modern English? [closed]

I will skip it over, because nobody will have doubt on this. Since nobody will have doubt on this, I will skip it over. I will skip it over, for nobody will have doubt on this. An ...
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1answer
84 views

What are the rules for combining verbs with and?

I am curious what the rules for combining verbs into a "compound verb" are. For example, is it proper to combine "guess and check" into a single verb as in: I guessed and checked that the answer ...
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34 views

Is “and with” grammatical in this sentence?

We have registered nurses working on site with a nutritional background to provide weight loss advice to clients and with at least a 2 year working experience. Is the part in bold grammatical?
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“Whether or not” vs. “whether”

This will depend on whether he's suitable for the job. This will depend on whether he's suitable for the job or not. This will depend on whether or not he's suitable for the job. ...
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1answer
49 views

Using prepositions and conjunctions in a sentence

Which one of the following example sentences are correct/more appropriate? It is better to laugh than cry. It is better to laugh than to cry. Some general tips would be helpful.
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35 views

“the boy Sam and Tom” or “the boys Sam and Tom”? [closed]

I do not know the grammatical terms for this kind of usage. I can only give an example. I want to describe two boys called Sam and Tom. Of course I can just say Sam and Tom are nice. But I ...
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2answers
76 views

As fast as Or As fast

He is as clever if not cleverer than his brother. Ranjeet is as fast as or perhaps faster than Rohit. Are both these sentences correct? As per Wren And Martin High School English Grammar ...
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2answers
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After this “as”, are there any words omitted?

“He is still out there somewhere, perhaps looking for another body to share… not being truly alive, he cannot be killed. He left Quirrell to die; he shows just as little mercy to his followers ...
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1answer
48 views

Would you start this with “however” or “but”? [closed]

The Chicago Manual (2013) calls however a "ponderous" way to begin a sentence, while but is more direct--it has more "impact." So let's put this stricture to the test with a sentence from UPenn's ...
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4answers
178 views

What's the proper way to refer to the form of a word that's improperly punctuated?

Example sentence: The Adventure's of Huckleberry Finn My dilemma: I would like to convey to the writer of the example sentence that the word Adventure's, in its current _____ form, is ...
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1answer
55 views

For as a coordinate connector

In this sentence "for" is used as coordinate connector, so therefore, both before and after "for" should be a complete clause right? "Despite its small size and slow gait, the wolverine is an ...
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5answers
2k views

Using a singular or plural verb after “and/or”

If the subject of a sentence is separated by "and/or", should the verb be pluralized, as with "and", or agree with the rightmost subject, as with "or"? For example: His co-workers and/or his boss ...
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1answer
43 views

In my example, can I use a comma before the word “thus”?

Graph 4 improves Graph 3 because it shows potentially similar outliers that occur at each birthday, thus this represents our best range of x.
6
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1answer
102 views

Concessive “as much as” and “much as”. Which came first?

Related: "Much though" vs "much as", Use of 'Much as' [closed], Using “as much as” at start of sentence Consider the following two variations: As much as I hate to admit it, I cannot swim. ...
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4answers
547 views

is there anything wrong with “from my perspective” [closed]

Is the expression "from my perspective" good English? I was always under the impression that "perspective" refers to what someone else can see (i.e. a third person), and that if you wanted to refer to ...
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2answers
39 views

Should there be punctuation before “and” in this sentence?

Perhaps this is a better sample: J, says, “No!” and Page furrows her forehead, and walks with J to the other side of the room. Would either of these be better? J, says, “No!” Page furrows ...
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3answers
33k views

Use of a semicolon before and comma after “however”

Several years ago, a previous boss told me to use a semicolon and comma with the word "however". I've always questioned this and would like to know if the following random sentences are using the ...