Conjunctions are words used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause, such as "and," "but," and "if."

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Is this a clumsy sentence?

This is a fascinating book and contains a wealth of historical detail Source To me, this sounds clumsy, using the conjunction "and". If it is correct, would somebody tell me why?
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31 views

“Curious as to who” vs. “curious of who”

I'm curious as to who you are. I'm curious of who you are. The person is anonymous and I'm just wondering who it is.
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Contract interpretation

To be eligible for holiday pay the employee must meet the following requirement: the employee must have worked the last scheduled day before, and the first scheduled day after a holiday except when ...
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4answers
2k views

Abbreviation for “or the rest” (or “or others”)?

The Latin et cetera, abbreviated etc., is often used at the end of an incomplete, inclusive list of items when it is clear that there are more items than can be enumerated conveniently and there is no ...
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30 views

“here” as a conjunction in a sence?

Is it correct to use "here" as a conjunction in written English? For example: In comparison to first-generation devices, here, the system is built from digital components. Thank you.
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23 views

use of since in simple,progressive, and perfect tenses [on hold]

please clarify the use of since in present,continuous, and perfect tenses?. if since is used in these tenses what meaning would it convey?
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2answers
317 views

Comma after a coordinating conjunction preceding a parenthetical at the start of the sentence

Although similar questions have been asked before, I am still not clear as to official or, at the very least, preferred position from punctuation rules point of view on comma after coordinating ...
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2answers
54 views

What are the title capitalization rules for rarely used prepositions like “down”, “up”, “off”, etc.?

In capitalizing English titles, my understanding is that all prepositions of four or fewer letters should be written lowercase, unless part of a phrasal verb. (I realize that AP style and the Chicago ...
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1answer
95 views

'For while …, yet …' : Right quantity and use of conjunctions?

For while the capacity to overcome all opposing sensible impulses can and must be simply presupposed in man on account of his freedom, yet this capacity as strength is something he must acquire. ...
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20 views

Is “and” necessary before the last item in the list of things after “such as”? [duplicate]

Could someone tell me whether "and" is necessary in the space: I like different types of fruits, such as apples, oranges, bananas, [and] pineapples.
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30 views

not only, but also

With reference to the principle of balance in the use of "not only, but also", can someone help me judge whether the following is correct: Not only are students encouraged to enhance their ...
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2answers
322 views

Syntax of “not only” + “furthermore”

Can I use not only with furthermore instead of also? Not only is he tall, he is also heavy. Can I say or write: Not only is he tall, he is furthermore heavy. or (and please tell me if this ...
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1answer
42 views

Can I begin a sentence with, “Unless, that is …”?

Given a rather long sentence that finishes with something like: ... and therefore, you need not submit that form. Is it allowable to start the next sentence with, "Unless, that is, you .....", or ...
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2answers
67 views

Do complex sentences always need a conjunction? [closed]

"At her age, Minggay Awok's only companions were a few charcoal black chickens." Because of "At her age," does this make the sentence complex, or is it still a simple sentence? I do know complex ...
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1answer
64 views

the omission of “but” in “not only …, (but also)”

I've seen some topics related to this correlative pair "not only.. but also", but I'm still not quite sure if it's correct to use a comma without any conjunction in this construction. "The American ...
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7answers
13k views

Does “either A or B ” preclude “both A and B”?

In mathematics, "A or B" includes "A and B". Does "either" mean "A or B but not (A and B)" or does it include the possibility of "A and B"? The context might be mathematics, formal logic or ordinary ...
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2answers
136 views

(conjunction) 'as' in 'at the same time as when'

This happened at the same time as when the window decorations disappeared. I don't know the meaning of 'as' in 'at the same time as when' and the usage of 'as' in this situation. What do you think ...
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2answers
72 views

Differences between “how ever”, “although”,“albeit”,

What is differences between "Albeit", "although","howbeit","however","though" and etc?
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1answer
34 views

Can “as well as” be a conjunction?

Can as well as be a conjunction that connects two independent sentences? The reference to the relevant rules and similar threads would be much appreciated. The training program will be introduced ...
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2answers
65 views

What is the grammatical designation of “that” in “…that she may have…”?

The following sentence is the Modern English translation of a line from the Old English poem Judith: He (God) advanced a gracious favour to her, that she may have a steadfast faith. My question ...
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7answers
1k views

Is there any valid rule discouraging the use of a certain word to start a sentence?

Is there any rule you think is valid that discourages the use of a certain word to start a sentence? Because I suspect the answer is no. But it would be good to have a blanket answer to this kind of ...
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3answers
33k views

“All but” idiom has two meanings?

Here's two ways I've seen the "all, but" idiom used: "Close all tabs but this one" (Any modern application with a number of tabs might have this as an option.) It means "close all the tabs, but not ...
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1answer
63 views

Substituting how for that

I feel the following sentence would be used by Native speakers but only in highly informal speech in certain areas: In his letter he explains how the book has a great plot and is generally enjoyable. ...
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1answer
44 views

“People who” or “people that” [closed]

I am doing homework and I got confused about this phrase when I was writing. I am not a native English speaker. (...) and the only way to do this was taking control of everything and being ...
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3answers
2k views

Does “or” mean both conditions?

We are ordinary Russian folks playing an English board game and came across this sentence: You may splay your green or blue cards left. We expected that it meant you must choose only one card ...
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1answer
52 views

Comma before a conjunction that precedes an infinitive phrase?

I understand that a comma is used before "and" when the conjunction precedes an independent clause; however, I'm curious if the same rule applies when it precedes an infinitive phrase: "It was my job ...
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323 views

Etymology of “save” in the meaning of “except”, “but”, “unless”

Why does save also mean other than : but or except "We had no hope save one." except for the fact that : only —used with that but, except —used before a word often taken to be the ...
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41 views

'before' vs. 'until'

Which is more appropriate? I had lived in New York for three years until/before I graduated from college. Perhaps, there may be a more appropriate expression, but if you have to use either of ...
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6answers
14k views

If you're starting a sentence with “and” or another conjunction, must you follow the conjunction with a comma?

When I was a kid, I was always told that starting a sentence off with "and" was improper. However, now it seems as if the consensus amongst members of the English cartel is that it is totally ...
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2answers
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“As I said” vs. “Like I said”

I was told that saying Like I said isn't grammatically correct although it is used a lot. That we should use As I said instead. Is it true?
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37 views

Is “correspondingly” used here correctly?

The importance of Internet access grows each day, correspondingly, web content accessibility too becomes equally important to ensure it meets the needs of users with disabilities. ...
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94 views

Explanation needed: Why is “and” wrong in this sentence?

It is difficult to predict what kinds of books will be popular in the years ahead, because tastes change and topics either get overexplored and lose their relevance. I have placed the key words ...
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4answers
445 views

How crazy can “and” be?

After seeing completely insane examples of "and" usage in this question , I realized that I have no clue how to use the word "and" grammatically: How far does the insanity go? Are the following ...
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1answer
46 views

Is 'as' a pronoun or conjunction in these sentences?

As you can see As you know What does these 'as' serve as? Pronoun or conjunction? Thanks!
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671 views

However vs. how ever: one word or two?

I am writing a paper and stumbled upon this sentence of mine. "The output remained consistently poor however the data was/were analysed". "The output remained consistently poor how ever the ...
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Should there be a space before and after an ampersand when writing numerals?

How should one write "one and two" in short form - 1&2 or 1 & 2? Are there any particular rules regarding this? In context: You may choose to do Information Technology Units [1&2/1 ...
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X was the case, so/but/since/because Y happened [closed]

The car dashed the tree. It was going at over 100mph. A) The blue car was going 100mph, so it dashed the tree. B) The blue car was going at over 100mph, but it dashed the tree. C) The blue ...
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5answers
120 views

The solution of so/but/since and because? [closed]

What do you think about the options of this case, i hav chosen the A", it's a little tricky?
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2answers
229 views

Order of pronouns and proper names in a sentence

Which is correct? Because he reads, Bob knows a lot. or: Because Bob reads, he knows a lot. Assuming the former, the follow-up question is, what happens with "when", "as", "after" and ...
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55 views

Replacing “and” with comma

EB size and structure is known to influence differentiation potential, and the microwell system provides a robust, efficient method of producing EBs of any size or shape. I've seen many sentences ...
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1answer
54 views

Conjunctive adverbs preceded by conjunctions

I've been under the impression that conjunctive adverbs needn't be preceded by a full-ish stop (e.g., a period or semicolon). I don't know where I got that idea, and consequently, as a lover of ...
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59 views

How to use conjunction in an object clause?

Is it OK to use comma space followed by "whereas" in an object clause like the following sentence? Experiments showed that H and K cells were highly sensitive to sugar, whereas P cells were ...
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2answers
47 views

Should the 'or' come at the end of the first line or beginning of the second?

I'm working on a webpage that has a form on it where the user can type into a box, or pick some options instead to fill it for them. If I am writing about a choice of options, and splitting that over ...
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4answers
464 views

Conjunction Puzzle: Is this clause dependent or independent?

Third grade teacher here. I plan to teach students to distinguish between simple, compound and complex sentences — but only if I can demonstrate a clear and meaningful difference between the latter ...
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2answers
13k views

Using “as much as” at start of sentence

Is it correct to use "as much as" at the start of the sentence? For example: As much as I like cricket, I like football. Is it correct? I didn't find any reference which suggest to use it that ...
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3answers
112 views

Compound-Complex Comma Usage

I couldn't find this question on here, and I've tried scouring the Internet, but to no avail. It's quite possible I'm just not searching with the appropriate keywords. The question is regarding comma ...
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11answers
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Can a sentence start with “Because”?

In my grade school days, I recall a teacher proclaiming to the class: You should never start a sentence with the word "Because". Of course, I've since seen lots of examples to the contrary, and ...
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2answers
68 views

Are these wordiness defects cases of syntactic pleonasm?

While critiquing a certain document, I noticed frequent instances of a kind of wordiness. Whereas I could have simply corrected each instance, I wanted to cite for the writer a general rule for ...
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Commas with nested subordinate clauses both of which are restrictive (essential to the meaning)

I have been grappling with the question below for a while now, so hope that you can shed some light on it. Do we need the first comma (the one in brackets below) in the restrictive nested ...
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1answer
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'Immediately' used not as an adverb, but as a conjunction

I'm sure that I've heard (not read) someone use the word immediately in a sentence in the same way that we would use "when" or "as soon as", and I would like to know if this is correct? Here's an ...