Conjunctions are words used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause, such as "and," "but," and "if."

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Trouble understanding the meaning of sentences with “unless” [closed]

I am having trouble understanding the meaning of sentences using unless. Here is an example: Unless I hear from you by 6pm Friday I will send the letters to main office. What does the above ...
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840 views

“I'm going to help you like I promised.” Good English? Informal? Only colloquially acceptable? Wrong? [duplicate]

I've often heard this kind of sentence where one substitutes the conjunction "like" for "as". Is it acceptable in written English? Is it considered wrong in spoken English?
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181 views

Using a comma before “and we already have a toaster.” [duplicate]

Which of the following is correct? No gifts please, we don't need any orchids and we already have a toaster. No gifts please, we don't need any orchids , and we already have a toaster.
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126 views

Different from x Different to x Different than [duplicate]

In the following sentence: "When I visited my old school after so many years, it looked completely different in the classrooms and the backyard /from what/to what/than/ it had been when I was a ...
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184 views

Which word(s) does “nuclear” modify in “by nuclear action or radiation or radioactive contamination”

Is the word nuclear assumed after the "or" in the following sentence? "by nuclear action or radiation or radioactive contamination" In other words, does the or assume that the nuclear applies to ...
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723 views

“as to + verb” vs “to + verb”

Are there any differences between these two forms? Example: "It has been done so as + to make it easier for academics and other judges to refer to a particular passage in a judicial ...
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1answer
6k views

Correct use of “albeit”, particularly with regard to commas

I’m not quite sure that the following sentence is gramatically correct. If it is, I wonder where I should put the comma or commas in the sentence using albeit. Obesity rates amongst men, whose ...
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Clause applying to first part of sentence when 'and' is used?

The requirement referred to in the first subparagraph shall not apply to fund of funds structures and master-feeder structures where the underlying funds have a depositary which provides ownership ...
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1answer
5k views

What does “v.” stand for? [closed]

In in the following sentence, what does the "v." stand for? The new system was partially indebted to Stanley v. Georgia Does it mean "Stanley and Georgia" or "Stanley against Georgia"?
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329 views

Order of pronouns and proper names in a sentence

Which is correct? Because he reads, Bob knows a lot. or: Because Bob reads, he knows a lot. Assuming the former, the follow-up question is, what happens with "when", "as", "after" and ...
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2k views

Comma before “and so”

I encountered the following two examples: Moreover, the proposed scheme is designed in an ID-based setting and so the necessity for certificates and some related problems are eliminated. Our ...
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2answers
5k views

Necessity of “that” as a conjunction

A simple Google search reveals that the word that can be used in many ways: as a pronoun, determiner, adverb and conjunction. I'm wondering about its usage specifically as a conjunction. Take the ...
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628 views

Starting a sentence with two subordinating conjunctions

Is it grammatical to start a sentence with two subordinating conjunctions? For example: Because if it rains tomorrow, I will get wet, I hoped for a sunny day. It seems wrong to start a sentence ...
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1answer
1k views

Using “respectively” with “and” vs. “or”

Is it acceptable usage to use "or" with "respectively", or is it possible only with "and"? Example: If the light changes from red to blue or from blue to red, you must catch or throw the ball, ...
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1answer
421 views

Why would you call “before” a preposition when it precedes a clause?

I'm new here & don't know all the etiquette & ins & outs, but I have a question about something posted in another thread. Modern grammar, however, recognises that prepositions can take ...
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1answer
166 views

What are the rules for combining verbs with and?

I am curious what the rules for combining verbs into a "compound verb" are. For example, is it proper to combine "guess and check" into a single verb as in: I guessed and checked that the answer ...
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1answer
38 views

Is “and with” grammatical in this sentence?

We have registered nurses working on site with a nutritional background to provide weight loss advice to clients and with at least a 2 year working experience. Is the part in bold grammatical?
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350 views

Using prepositions and conjunctions in a sentence

Which one of the following example sentences are correct/more appropriate? It is better to laugh than cry. It is better to laugh than to cry. Some general tips would be helpful.
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56 views

“the boy Sam and Tom” or “the boys Sam and Tom”? [closed]

I do not know the grammatical terms for this kind of usage. I can only give an example. I want to describe two boys called Sam and Tom. Of course I can just say Sam and Tom are nice. But I ...
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2answers
316 views

As fast as Or As fast

He is as clever if not cleverer than his brother. Ranjeet is as fast as or perhaps faster than Rohit. Are both these sentences correct? As per Wren And Martin High School English Grammar ...
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1answer
83 views

Would you start this with “however” or “but”? [closed]

The Chicago Manual (2013) calls however a "ponderous" way to begin a sentence, while but is more direct--it has more "impact." So let's put this stricture to the test with a sentence from UPenn's ...
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1answer
316 views

For as a coordinate connector

In this sentence "for" is used as coordinate connector, so therefore, both before and after "for" should be a complete clause right? "Despite its small size and slow gait, the wolverine is an ...
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1answer
453 views

Concessive “as much as” and “much as”. Which came first?

Related: "Much though" vs "much as", Use of 'Much as' [closed], Using “as much as” at start of sentence Consider the following two variations: As much as I hate to admit it, I cannot swim. ...
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499 views

Conjoiners vs conjunctions vs articles

I've heard that conjoiners (in terms of grammar) are similar to articles. According to sources, articles can be words such as the, an, a, some (in unique cases). Conjunctions can be and, but, as well ...
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3answers
2k views

Is it correct to write “…, so…”? Is it formal to use “so” in writing?

Is it correct to write "..., so..."? e.g. You are handsome, so you are appreciated. Is it correct to use "so" in formal writing? If not, what are the alternatives?
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Should there be punctuation before “and” in this sentence?

Perhaps this is a better sample: J, says, “No!” and Page furrows her forehead, and walks with J to the other side of the room. Would either of these be better? J, says, “No!” Page furrows ...
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132 views

meaning of “yet” “as if”

I don't understand the second part of this sentence: The Berlin Congress of 1878 and the first set of frontiers drawn on maps ignored key components of local life, and yet they were drawn as ...
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A relative adverb or a conjunction or both?

I am not familiar with the idea that an adverb can function as a conjunction at the same time. Here are a couple of sentences that are confusing me. This is the reason why she left him. ...and ...
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135 views

It the phrase “They identify themselves as Pacifist, but the EU as an arrogant power” grammatical?

Is this phrase grammatical? They identify themselves as Pacifist, but the EU as an arrogant power. Is a verb necessary in the second part of the sentence?
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472 views

Usage of 'and' between more than two items

Beijing will face trade sanctions from the United States, which brought the case, and the European Union and Japan. vs Beijing will face trade sanctions from the United States, which brought ...
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500 views

“Though”, “even though” and “although”

I do want to know what is the difference between these three conjunctions. Are there any differences? "Though" vs. "Even though" vs. "Although"
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344 views

The suffix -hood

I am using the suffix -hood as both base and suffix to derive poetical meaning in an interplay of the words "...child and adult hood." Though this may offend the ear of the modern day reader, I ...
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1answer
170 views

“If this, and if that.” With or without Comma?

I’ll appreciate it if you wash the car, and if you take out the trash. Should I use a comma before and, or not?
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349 views

How to punctuate combinations of 'and' and 'or'

For this question, please bear in mind that or denotes [[either or both]]. I need to express that Mary will go to the movies with, either one of, or both of, Jane and John. Jane or John and Mary ...
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252 views

Do subordinating conjunctions subordinate clauses with verbs only?

While in Rome, John took a lot of pictures. While he was in Rome, John took a lot of pictures. Although on vacation, John calls the office often. Although he is on vacation, John calls the ...
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Is it possible to get real property from the phrase “real and tangible personal property”?

My understanding from the research that I have done on the phrase "real and tangible personal property is has follows: Real and tangible are adjectives and is a conjunction that puts together ...
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542 views

Two imperative clauses joined by coordinating conjunction taken as a conditional

I would be inclined to parse the sentence "Nobody move and nobody get hurt" as two commands: Nobody move. Nobody get hurt. In other words, this is equivalent to "Nobody move or get hurt" (for ...
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Would you possibly elaborate your explanations? [closed]

Mary doesn’t play the piano well and nor does Alex. Mary doesn’t play the piano well. Nor does Alex. Are they the same? and which one do you use? ......................................... Now, ...
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Is it grammatically sound to group nouns/verbs sharing a preposition that governs the same object using an “and” multiple times in one sentence?

For example, does the following sentence violate any grammar rules? "Global Connections" will be showcasing internship opportunities, job openings and training programs at, challenges and issues ...
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154 views

problem about “that” / a conjunction? or r.pronoun?

I've a problem in the following text, please help me. A shroud is a piece of cloth that a dead person's body is wrapped in before it is buried. my problem is- is shroud a proper noun? And what ...
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125 views

In my example, can I use a comma before the word “thus”?

Graph 4 improves Graph 3 because it shows potentially similar outliers that occur at each birthday, thus this represents our best range of x.
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6k views

“And” vs. “or” when specifying a collection

If I am looking for one or more of A/B/C, but nothing else, and I want to tell that to somebody, do I say "I am only looking for A, B, and C" or "I am only looking for A, B, or C"? An example with ...
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Should I Use a Comma before the Second “and”

Please enter your email and password, and click on the “Log In” button. Should I use a comma before the second “and”?
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is there a rule that simple coordinator “and” is changed for “or” in negations?

For instance: Sally can play the guitar and the piano. Martin can't play the guitar or the piano.
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Should I use a comma in this sentence?

I am trying to teach myself punctuation rules. I have this sentence: The Disney version generally considered both racist and sexist portrayed the female characters in stereotypical roles and ...
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1answer
2k views

Comma before “and that” in a compound object

You should have known that he is quite adept at what he does and that he has the best conversion rate. You should have known that he is quite adept at what he does, and that he has the best ...
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1answer
288 views

Comma in “still is, and will always remain”

Manchester United still is and will always remain a force despite these setbacks. Do I need a comma after is here? I personally don't think so but would like to be sure.
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5answers
827 views

“Maybe one of A or C cheated” — is this correct?

I want to express an assertion that A cheated or C cheated. Can I say: Maybe one of A or C cheated. Maybe one of A and C cheated. Or is neither correct?
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“Thus” vs. “so” in formal English

Currently there are about 4000 international students from 110 different nations across the world, thus/so the university offers perfect conditions for socializing and making new friends. Is this ...
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Using “as much as” at start of sentence

Is it correct to use "as much as" at the start of the sentence? For example: As much as I like cricket, I like football. Is it correct? I didn't find any reference which suggest to use it that ...