Tagged Questions

Conjunctions are words used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause, such as "and," "but," and "if."

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“Where” as a conjunction

There were two sentences I wrote: We did a science experiment where we dissected frogs. This is the last day where I'll be waiting for you by your locker. I'm not sure if where can be used as a ...
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3answers
147 views

When to use the words “how” and “that”

I wrote this sentence: Tyray also thought about how he would see Darrell’s dead face. However, I remember my teacher telling us the distinction between how and that, and that how is often used ...
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2k views

Use of “what” vs “that”

The following sentence was on one of the tests: What would you like to do that others have told you is impossible. Students have asked why that could not be replaced with what. I.e., What ...
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3answers
249 views

How to join two phrases sharing a common ending

One of my professors asked me if I would be working on an assignment alone or in a group. I responded by saying: I was looking at the assignment and I feel that I am capable of, and therefore ...
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1answer
13k views

“so long as” vs. “as long as”

I just googled the difference between as long as and so long as. The difference has alredy been discussed here. There are, it seems, two contexts for these expressions: lengths and physical ...
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1answer
218 views

Pluralization of nouns left out with conjunction

Can a repeated noun be left out in a conjunction? The particular example I am thinking of is a sentence that starts: Element A and element B.... Which I would shorten as: Element A and B... ...
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2answers
239 views

Is there a suitable conjunction which fits the meaning of “as a continuation of”? [closed]

I want to use it in my thesis. Like secondarily, but I don't want to use that one or similar words, as these specify an order.
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1answer
74 views

“Bridging X and Y” or “bridging X with Y”?

Which is the correct (or more correct) version of this phrase and why? Bridging ancient wisdom with contemporary science Bridging ancient wisdom and contemporary science.
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Use of a semicolon before and comma after “however”

Several years ago, a previous boss told me to use a semicolon and comma with the word "however". I've always questioned this and would like to know if the following random sentences are using the ...
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1answer
452 views

Is this a relative pronoun or conjunction?

I want to know everything (that) there is to know about you. I chanced to come across ‘expletive there’ in a syntactic textbook. It says in this type of sentences: there is an expletive, to know ...
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4answers
1k views

Can “as soon as” ever mean “immediately after”?

Does as soon as mean "immediately after" in the following sentence? He got home as soon as 2 hours. I know that this could be a tad messy without context, but I found it as an example with the ...
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1answer
1k views

Meaning of “either”: “not /A or B/” = “not /either A or B/”?

In a positive sentence, "either . . .or" is sometimes used to express an exclusive disjunction. However, what happens when “either” is used in negation, as in sentence two below? Is the meaning the ...
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2answers
1k views

Too many “and”s? Is it grammatically correct?

A friend of mine (a non-native speaker of English) has asked me to check her CV and I'm afraid / ashamed to say, I'm having trouble. Are there too many "and"s in the given sentence? It seems OK to ...
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3answers
407 views

What is the grammatical function of 'since' in this sentence?

What is the grammatical function of 'since' in the following sentence? Four years had passed since his father died.
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2answers
179 views

Is this an adverbial or a noun clause?

Yet the days crept by, and there could be no doubt that Fluffy was still alive and well behind the locked door. (Harry Potter) Do you call the that-clause as an adverbial clause, or a noun ...
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3answers
6k views

Clauses, and comma before “nor”

Does this sentence have two independent clauses? I do not like biology nor do I like chemistry. To me the last clause seems dependent, but I find sources that tell me to place a comma before ...
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2answers
2k views

Does “or” mean both conditions?

We are ordinary Russian folks playing an English board game and came across this sentence: You may splay your green or blue cards left. We expected that it meant you must choose only one card ...
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2answers
174 views

“Changing and improving are not always the same thing” or “Changing and improving is not always the same thing”

Are both valid? I think the first is the only option, but I have been challenged on this and I can't explain exactly why the second is wrong. It does make sense, I suppose.
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638 views

Is “tell neither X nor Y” equivalent to “not tell both X and Y” or “not tell either X and Y”? [closed]

Given the sentence "John told neither the boss nor the secretary.", which of the following has the same meaning? John did not tell both the boss and the secretary. John did not tell either ...
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1answer
331 views

“As smart as you may be” means “However smart you may be”?

As smart as you may be, there are always difficult problems making you in trouble. In this sentence does "As smart as you may be" mean "No matter how smart you may be"? So, the first as is a ...
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1answer
3k views

Is “the way how” wrong?

I was correcting an ESL learner who said "It is the way how we write." I realize "It is the way we write" is correct and "It is how we write" is correct, but "It is the way how we write" looks wrong ...
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2answers
338 views

Grammaticality of “I have a car, neither does Sara” [closed]

Can we say "I have a red car. Neither does Sara." or must we say "I have a red car but Sara doesn't."? I have read this on a website and they said that the first sentence is incorrect but I don't ...
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2answers
734 views

Should we use “like” as a conjunction?

I know that like is a preposition but why not using it as conjunction? Examples: It's as if I'm walking on air It's like I'm walking on air What is the difference?
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251 views

Mixing adjective and noun enumerations

I am having trouble writing a seemingly simple sentence. I am organising an event where three kinds of food will be served: hot beverages cold beverages finger food My trouble deals with putting ...
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5answers
20k views

Can you use two “and”s in a sentence?

For example, I like chocolate, vanilla, and lemon and orange ice cream. Indicating "lemon and orange" is a combined flavor, as an item in the list needing an initial and.
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9answers
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Is it “Check and mate” or “Checkmate”?

I found the expression “Check and mate!” in the following sentence describing furious exchange of words between CNN host Piers Morgan and rightwing radio host and anti-gun-control propagandist Alex ...
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3answers
354 views

“Medicine is good when your family gives it to you not when your friend gives you one or when you take it by yourself”

I am editing a 5th grade paper. He has autism as well as some learning difficulties. He wrote: Medicine is good when your family gives it to you not when your friend gives you one or when you ...
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1answer
4k views

Is “even when” a conjunction?

Does even when grammatically work the same as even though and even if work? Or is it more of a time expression? Following the rules is essential, even when it’s difficult. Following the rules is ...
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1answer
375 views

“We have” vs. “we have that” [closed]

In a mathematical context, which of the following options is more appropriate? Since the fact A is true, we have B=C. Since the fact A is true, we have that B=C.
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2answers
68 views

'and to' quagmire

Consider: Her goal is to pioneer the idea of gardening in small or urban environments, and to inspire and educate people everywhere to grow their own organic food and live sustainably. The comma ...
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2answers
6k views

Use of “Or”, inclusive or exclusive?

My wife and I are playing a game where you roll dice and move so many spaces in a grid "vertically or horizontally". In the use of English it is very common to say, this or the other when it comes ...
3
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1answer
274 views

Where shall I put the comma in this sentence?

I'm not sure whether I should write like this: Try A or, a more famous one, B. Or like this Try A, or a more famous one, B. Or try other forms to avoid expression like this. Does anyone ...
2
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2answers
218 views

How to format “and” or “&” in a three-line header or title [closed]

I need to know which formatting is more appropriate. Should I place the connecting and or & at the end of second line or at the beginning of the third line? Here is what I mean: Lorem ipsum ...
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2answers
2k views

“A, B, C, or etc.” vs. “A, B, or C, etc.” vs. “A, B, C, etc.”

I think correct usages of "and" and "etc." are: A, B, C, and etc. A, B, and etc. But the example usage of "or" and "etc." I found in my dictionary is: A or B, etc. Why it is not: A, ...
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1answer
149 views

Is the “or not” in “whether or not” optional? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Whether or not” vs. “whether” I am not sure about the usage of whether. My confusion over it is whether or not is optional. Suppose I have the following sentence: ...
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0answers
27 views

Should there be a comma before ‘and’ with respect to different nouns? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Should I put a comma before the last item in a list? What is the difference between tomato puree, paste, and sauce? OR What is the difference between tomato ...
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3answers
1k views

Usage differences between “than”, “to”, and “over”

I understand that than, rather than, over and to are used to compare things. How ever I am not sure when to use those for specific scenarios. Are these interchangeable? Consider the sentence below: ...
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3answers
437 views

Contexts where a comma means “and”

A comma is commonly used as a short form of the word and in newspaper headlines. In what other contexts is this convention common? This question came to mind as I was trying to parse the following ...
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1answer
12k views

Using “are/is” after a list with “and/or” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Singular or plural following a list James and Mark are going to help you. Here, I use 'are' because the subject is plural. James or Mark are going to help you. ...
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2answers
487 views

Simple past vs. past perfect

Which is correct to use in the following example, simple past or past perfect? We were completely in the dark after the wind blew the candle out. We were completely in the dark after the wind ...
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2answers
133 views

“Drag & dropping” or “Dragging & dropping”

"Drag & dropping" sounds better to me, but "Dragging & dropping" has more Google results... Which one is correct and why?
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1answer
4k views

Comma use in “I am passionate about X, whether it be …”

I have trouble telling when I’m overusing commas. My question is if the comma between undertake and whether is needed: I am passionate about the quality of work I undertake, whether it be school ...
2
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2answers
353 views

Should I use a comma in written instructions?

I'm writing a technical user guide for a piece of software and am not sure whether I should be using a comma or not when giving instructions. Which of the following is correct? To add a new item ...
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2answers
2k views

Is “since so long” correct?

Because of our negligence towards the issue since so long, ... Am I using this correctly? I want to convey something like 1-2 months ago or since around September.
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5answers
9k views

If you're starting a sentence with “and” or another conjunction, must you follow the conjunction with a comma?

When I was a kid, I was always told that starting a sentence off with "and" was improper. However, now it seems as if the consensus amongst members of the English cartel is that it is totally ...
1
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1answer
135 views

Is this 'as' a conjunction?

I guess ‘as’ is a conjunction. If then, is as-clause an adjective clause that modifies ‘Muggle money’? There was a train to London in five minutes' time. Hagrid, who didn't understand 'Muggle ...
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2answers
2k views

Use of “because of”

In high school, the teacher told me that because is used to answer “why” question, as below: Why you are you using my shoes? I am using your shoes because I like them. However, the use ...
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3answers
10k views

Is saying “but nevertheless…” redundant?

I've heard in many places, educated people saying "but nevertheless...". I think both but and nevertheless have the play the same role. Is their combination, as to emphasize that what follows is ...
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2answers
3k views

Past Perfect sentences with “before”

I had seen a documentary on the Whydah before we visited it in Providence. Sir Francis Drake had worked for the British Navy before he became a pirate. These two sentences seem quite awkward to ...
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2answers
205 views

And/or in total negation: “Some people are not able to interpret and/or analyze”

In the following sentence, the “and/or” seems odd in a case of total negation: Evidently some people are not able to interpret and/or analyze at that deeper level. Because the sentence says “are not ...