Conjunctions are words used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause, such as "and," "but," and "if."

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Because of in the beginning of a sentence [duplicate]

Is this sentence right? " I eventually go to that restaurant. Because of the prices I can't afford to go there very often" Can I start a sentence using "Because of"?? Thanks
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“Went and got” — is it grammatically correct?

Trying to find out if phrases like "went and got" are correct, e.g.: She went and got the book.
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189 views

Does this sentence have too many subjunctives?

Does this sentence have too many subjunctives? If it please the king, let it be decreed that they be destroyed, and I will pay 10,000 talents of silver into the hands of those who have charge ...
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102 views

Why does my grammar check want to correct “versus” to “or”?

I typed the following sentence into Google Docs: The calculation becomes more involved, since there are several different ways to use the silicon wafers (polycrystalline versus monocrystalline). ...
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44 views

Use of “and especially”

Is and in the following sentence optional? He disliked nearly all women, and especially the young and pretty ones.
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Should an “and” be placed before the last item in a list if the item is followed by an “etc.”?

Which of the following sentences is correct? There are several types of email uses, such as professional, personal, and promotional etc. There are several types of email uses, such as ...
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127 views

When did the conjunction “for” become old-fashioned?

I am not going to school today, for I am sick. When did "for" become old-fashioned? Is it still used in everyday conversation?
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98 views

Is there a name for this ambiguity problem or for the construction that solves it?

I read a sentence, John has published research in academic journals of philosophy and law. The author meant John has published research in academic journals of philosophy and in academic ...
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71 views

Can I add a comma here just for “rhythm”?

I have the following sentence in a technical paper: Recent research has addressed this issue in two important ways: by developing and improving on automatic algorithms and by exploring ...
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331 views

Is a comma before a conjunction optional, or old? (not talking about lists) [duplicate]

I have been corrected several times recently for putting a comma before a conjunction in a sentence (splitting phrases, not items in a list). To each their own style guide, but my understanding was ...
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Difference between “which” and “that” as subordinate conjunctions [duplicate]

What are the differences between their meanings if one use them as conjunctions? Should they be used in separate cases?
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149 views

order of the clauses linked by the conjunction 'while': why does it matter some times and at other times not?

Taken from First Certificate Language Practice, by Michael Vince, page 78, exercise 7, sentences 2) and 7): 2) John has done well in French, but not so well in Maths. (to be rewritten as, says the ...
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What constructions enable a writer to preserve strict logical coherence and reduce redundancy when conjuncting two noun-phrases?

What constructions allow a writer to preserve strict logical coherence and reduce redundancy when conjuncting two noun-phrases? Example Many cultures have used gold or silver bullion as a ...
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Are sentences starting with “that” (conjunction) standard English

In Dutch one could say things such as Dat hij dat durft! That he that dares! (An exclamation of astonishment) Which would be roughly translated as: that he dares to do that. Is that initial that ...
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172 views

Is there a single word for the conjunction “and/or”? [duplicate]

For example: "Would you like to eat a pizza and/or a hamburger"
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705 views

Which word(s) can be used to express causal relation in modern English? [closed]

I will skip it over, because nobody will have doubt on this. Since nobody will have doubt on this, I will skip it over. I will skip it over, for nobody will have doubt on this. An ...
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417 views

Example for “so” as a subordinating conjunction

On a webpage called Daily Writing Tips there is a list of 25 subordinating conjunctions including so. The example they're giving is this: “So sure were you of your theory about them, you ignored ...
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Is “so” really coordinating here?

So is known to be one of the coordinating conjunctions of English. So it can introduce an independent sentence or clause. Those are defined as containing a complete thought as opposed to the ...
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Comma before “and” in “alleging harassment, and retaliation, which has now been…”

Please be advised that the clerks Intake Specialist Unit is in receipt of the complaint you filed against Maple Lee alleging harassment, and retaliation, which has now been assigned Intake ...
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Is there a name for the parts that are connected by a conjunction?

For example, the parts of a sentence that a preposition operates on are called "prepositional objects". I was wondering if there's a name for the parts that are connected by a conjunction? E.g. in ...
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362 views

Using 'for' as a coordinating conjunction at sentence beginning

As I understand it, 'for' is a coordinating conjunction. Learning German as a second language has taught me specifics about reforming sentences, but it is an awful lot less common in English. If I ...
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99 views

infinitive/comma/sentence fragment question

Cabs can drive people anywhere, but cannot be hailed at, or below Jon Street and Frank Street. My question is should there be a comma after anywhere? Is but a conjunction in this case? I am not ...
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Multiple Ands but might still be correct? [duplicate]

I just wrote an interesting sentence and I'm on the fence on if it seems proper. I left it as a comment over on StackOverflow so the content may not mean much to you, but the structure interests me: ...
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171 views

Is it correct to join two complete sentences with a comma without coordinating conjunction?

1) If, for whatever reason, you don’t think the quoted price is legitimate, please kindly inform us of your target price. Our sales teams would be glad to work around your budget. 2) If, for whatever ...
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“She told I ate an apple” or “She told that i ate an apple” [duplicate]

Should I use That in this case? On my native language (Brazilian Portuguese) the That would be like conjunction Que, I don't know if in english, That are also used like a conjunction. If yes, the ...
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187 views

Are these how's meaning 'how well'?

It’s not easy how I have to read clauses starting with how. I’m going to start this question with a case from Longman –– “He was impressed at how well she could read! (A)”. Though Longman says how is ...
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Using 'but' instead of 'and'

This is the first time I have come across a use of but to mean and without having a negative context. If the usage is correct, how would it be different from being used after a context with not only ...
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“However” vs. “but” — which is more formal?

I realize there are questions on the correct usage of "but" and "however". In this case, I am concerned with correctness in a formal context. I have heard it said that however should be used in ...
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Conjunction when one element contains another

I write a paper that defines a certain algorithm on geometric shapes. I have a sentence similar to the following: If the input to the algorithm is connected, convex or rectangular, then its output ...
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How to use “when” vs. “while” on the following occasions?

Please have a look at these sentence pairs: When I worked as a teacher, I met a good friend. While I was working as a teacher, I met a good friend. When I had a dream, I thought ...
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102 views

Meaning of “I have three books and CDs”

I have three books and CDs. Does this mean I have three books and three CDs? Or are there three items in total? Are both possible? I am asking for a native speaker's opinion.
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Enumeration with 'and' [duplicate]

Could you tell me which is correct in the following situation: I have one parrot, its feathers are of different colors. Which is the correct way to speak about the parrot: I have a parrot. It ...
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Is a comma followed by 'and' grammatically correct?

Is a comma followed by 'and' grammatically correct? For example: This Agreement, and any and all disputes directly or indirectly arising...
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'but' for contrast and 'but' for opposition

'But' does not mean the same thing in "I like pop music but my parents like classical music." and in "My parents have played a lot of classical music to me but I still don't like it." What is it ...
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Can “neither” be placed at the beginning of the sentence?

Which of the following is grammatical? Trust neither a new friend nor an old enemy. Neither trust a new friend nor an old enemy.
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Can I use the word “not” after a preposition?

Can I write something like: among people from that country and among people from not I know it can be easily rewritten as: among people that are from the country and among people that are ...
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“As I said” vs. “Like I said”

I was told that saying Like I said isn't grammatically correct although it is used a lot. That we should use As I said instead. Is it true?
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How to abbreviate “and” when used in a name [duplicate]

How to abbreviate "and" in titles such as "Lavender 'n Fields"?
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“Do you still want me to do X” vs. “do you still want that I do X”

Which is correct? Do you still want me to do the project for you? Do you still want that I do the project for you?
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[clause in simple tense], rather than [verb in -ing form]

Consider the following sentence from wikipedia. Many people embrace their fetish rather than attempting treatment to rid themselves of it. When I read it, it flows naturally.But when I analyze ...
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Conjunction contraction - second “a” and “at”

Which one is correct? Or are both acceptable? *He earned an MD and a gold medal from St James for his dissertation. *He earned an MD and gold medal from St James for his dissertation. *He was ...
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Poetic syntax with “as” and “so”

Does anyone know how to describe the type of poetic syntax of the line: "As the deer panteth for the water / So my soul longeth after thee" or something to that effect. I'm not sure if this ...
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106 views

Using a comma to avoid using “and”

In my writing I often use a comma and the past progressive tense (I think) to make sentences more concise. For example: The new design was more intuitive and user-friendly, reducing user errors. ...
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What does a sentence like “Little if…but…” mean?

I've read it in a news report, "Little if any news will be released during the event(China reform summit), but official news agency Xinhua traditionally issues a dispatch on the last day." Well, I ...
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The use of nearly-similar words

I have heard people using two words that are nearly similar or with a subtle difference. The examples include 'each and every' & 'until and unless'. Is it correct to use these words in English? ...
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Using a singular or plural verb after “and/or”

If the subject of a sentence is separated by "and/or", should the verb be pluralized, as with "and", or agree with the rightmost subject, as with "or"? For example: His co-workers and/or his boss ...
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2answers
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“As [adjective] as a [noun]” vs “as [adjective] a [noun] as there”

How does the meaning differ for the following two sentences? Even then, the subject seemed as fascinating a problem as there could be. Even then, the subject seemed as fascinating as a ...
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Why is the sentence “She sighed, and began whispering again” grammatically incorrect?

That's a line from a Twilight book. It's a grammar mistake pointed out by this website. She sighed, and began whispering again. I don't see anything wrong with it. Is the comma the mistake?
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A question on co-ordinating conjunctions in a compound sentence

A compound sentence is characterized by one or more than one main-clauses joined by a co-ordinating conjuction, as opposed to a complex sentence, which has a main clause together with a dependent or a ...
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Suffered from vs suffered

When should I use from? Example: His company suffered a setback. Vs His company suffered from a setback. She suffered from a heart attack. Vs She suffered a heart attack I realise that sometimes ...