Conjunctions are words used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause, such as "and," "but," and "if."

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Need help understanding phrases of the form “x if y”

I regularly find myself confused by phrases of the form "x if y". For example, in the 2010-10-22 issue of his newsletter, Paul Thurrott writes: Well, if you're Wall Street Journal technology maven ...
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Historical frequency of expression “and/or”: Corpus search

What is the historical frequency of the expression “and/or”? I have a feeling that I almost never see it in older texts, but that it is has become exponentially common in the past five or ten years. ...
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XXIII, neither IIIXX nor XIIIX, represents 23. Is it correct grammar?

I want to say that we cannot represent 23 in Roman as both IIIXX and XIIIX. The correct representation for 23 in Roman is XXIII. If I write like this XXIII, neither IIIXX nor XIIIX, represents ...
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Which of these sentences use the correct grammar?

Me and Larry had a meeting today. Larry and me had a meeting today. I and Larry had a meeting today. Larry and I had a meeting today. I know the third one is wrong (because it doesn't ...
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Is there a symbol for “and/or”?

I am wondering if there is a symbol or glyph to represent the conjunct "and/or". I doubt there is a formal, de jure symbol (i.e., found in any manual of style or dictionary), but I cannot even find ...
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You are all “but” forced to do something instead of something else

What is the grammatical usage of "but" in this sentence? You are all but forced to use them instead of standard C++ Could we ignore "but" and yet convey the same meaning? You are all forced ...
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“The larger of A and B” or “the larger of A or B”

I was wondering which one is more correct between "the larger of A and B" and "the larger of A or B". I use the former, but I saw in IRS instruction for Form 1040: In most cases, your federal ...
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Is saying “but nevertheless…” redundant?

I've heard in many places, educated people saying "but nevertheless...". I think both but and nevertheless have the play the same role. Is their combination, as to emphasize that what follows is ...
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Can one conjugate and use 'suicide' as a verb?

I don't remember ever seeing suicide used as a standalone verb. I've always seen it as commits suicide or committed suicide. Can you conjugate and use suicide by itself?
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On the expression “no [noun 1] or any [noun 2]”

I have often seen the following expressions: [ex.] 1. I have no allergies or any medical issues. 2. John serves a chicken with no sauce or any kind of seasoning. I suspect that such a use is ...
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429 views

“How” vs. “that” in “You know how we have pizza on Thursdays, right?”

From time to time I hear sentences like this: You know how we have pizza on Thursdays, right? Here, how doesn't mean exactly how those guys eat pizza, it is something like "that" in this ...
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I am “adjective” and I am “present continuous” in one sentence

Do I need to use "I am" twice in one sentence, or it is enough to use it only in the beginning? Where does this rule come from? My example: I am fluent in three languages and I am pursuing the ...
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Should I use a comma before “and” or “or”?

Is using a comma then an "and" or an "or" after it proper punctuation? Example: I fell over, and hurt my knee. Should I go, or not?
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How to use 'as well as' and 'even'?

When I was doing my English homework, I came across this question: In his research paper Dr Brown suggests that snacking, if done properly, makes people healthier and __ helps control weight. A. ...
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Where to insert comma(s)?

Compare these: She tried, and, as expected, failed. She tried, and as expected, failed. She tried and, as expected, failed. She tried and as expected, failed. She tried and (as ...
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When to use a comma before “and”

I often see people on the Internet using a comma before and in many cases (not adversative cases). Is it ok? In my language it is stricly prohibited to use a comma before an and except for adversative ...
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Can I use “therefore”, “so”, “hence” and “thus” interchangeably?

I was taught that, at least, 'therefore' and 'so' and can be used interchangeably, one being informal, the other formal. But, even when written, replacing 'so' with 'therefore' doesn't seem correct. ...
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Whether an omitted “that” should be replaced with a comma in certain situations

Consider a sentence like this: "I'm just letting you know that the meeting is at 6 tonight." It would be pretty common to omit "that" in this sentence: "I'm just letting you know the meeting is at ...
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Because vs. due to with adjectives?

I know that because of modifies verbs, whereas due to modifies nouns. However, what do I do if I see something like: We find that X is better than Y is most cases, due to lack of support for Y. ...
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What does “but” imply in this sentence?

From the very second paragraph of "Foundation" by Isaac Asimov: There were nearly twenty-five million inhabited planets in the Galaxy then, and not one but owed allegiance to the Empire whose seat ...
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Poetic syntax with “as” and “so”

Does anyone know how to describe the type of poetic syntax of the line: "As the deer panteth for the water / So my soul longeth after thee" or something to that effect. I'm not sure if this ...
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“faux conjunction” [closed]

I am looking at a computerized sample question and solution from a university writing improvement center. True or false. The following sentence is punctuated correctly. Carl Jung was born in ...
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When do I use “me” and when “I”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Should I put myself last? I get this mixed up so often. Should I say: Me and Rob are going swimming. or I and Rob are going swimming. I know the latter ...
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is there a rule that simple coordinator “and” is changed for “or” in negations?

For instance: Sally can play the guitar and the piano. Martin can't play the guitar or the piano.
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Using “though” at the beginning of the following sentence

But during the trip, she hardly spoke with him. In fact, she hardly spoke with anyone in the group. She would just follow us quietly to whereever we went, like a little stray cat. Though she ...
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Is it: My apples and orange are/is wrong?

Simple question: My apples and orange are wrong or My apples and orange is wrong I am not a native English speaker, and I am having some trouble choosing between plural are or singular is ...
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Specific usage of the word 'but'

The Aesop's Fables translated by George Fyler Townsend book has a line which reads as follows: ... If you had but touched me, my friend, you ... I've seen the word 'but' used this way a couple ...
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What’s the role of ‘because’ in this conversation?

I’ve lost track of the logical flow of the following conversation between Lucius Malfoy and Harry. And still, behind his back, Dobby was pointing, first to the diary, then to Lucius Malfoy, then ...
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What does “if and when” mean, and is it the same as “when and if”?

Rather than trying to describe my beef with this idiom, I will give a bunch of successively objectionable examples. None of these are taken from real life. As I see it, if (and when) both "if" and ...
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How to phrase “my time and Bob's time” more succinctly?

I can say "Bob and I are going" instead of "I'm going and Bob is going." I want to say something like "This is a waste of my time and Bob's time," but only saying "time" once. I can't say "our" ...
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Analysis (tree diagram) of “She hugged and kissed her mother”

I was wondering how linguists analyze sentences like "She hugged and kissed her mother" or "Will you have that with or without syrup?" or "Four and five are the square roots of sixteen and ...
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Are “should” and “if” interchangeable at the beginning of a sentence? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: A special use of “should”? If "should" comes at the beginning of a sentence, and the sentence is not a question, then can it be replaced with "if?" Is there any ...
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Should we use “like” as a conjunction?

I know that like is a preposition but why not using it as conjunction? Examples: It's as if I'm walking on air It's like I'm walking on air What is the difference?
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If a noun phrase is made of two noun-like words that conjugate differently, then which conjugation do you use? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Neither Michael nor Albert is correct” or “Neither Michael nor Albert are correct”? Is “either you or [third-person]” followed by a ...
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Articles in conjuctions

The following is taken from a book: As a result, hosting in IIS 5/6 is notorious for instability and the frequent need to reset the server or IIS 5/6. In the context above, why doesn't ...
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“I would like to ask you that have you”

Someone sent me something and then checked back with me writing: I would like to ask you that have you received my gift? I myself thought this sentence was really uncommon (I have not heard it ...
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When should we use proximity rule in “either/or”, and “neither/nor”?

According to this link, if at least one of the nouns involved is plural then it should take the plural form of the verb. Otherwise, it should take the singular form of the verb. But in the last part ...
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Should “vice versa” be treated as an independent clause?

I know "vice versa" more or less means "conversely," but when it is used by itself, should it be punctuated as if it were an independent clause? Dogs don't like cats, and vice versa. or Dogs ...
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Subordinating conjunction following conjunctive adverb

Dogs are usually friendly; however, while eating some are unpredictable. Does "eating" need to be followed by a comma? It appears to me that a comma is necessary because "while eating" functions ...
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Use of “although” with a modifier

Is it grammatically correct to use "although" in a modifying clause, but without a conjugated verb? Example: Although not regarded as nocturnal, the Black Bear of North America is active at night ...
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Is it mandatory to use a comma before a coordinating conjunction uniting the two independent clauses in a compound sentence?

My friend and I had an argument about whether this sentence required a comma: I understand where you're coming from but I disagree. My friend insisted that there should be a comma before "but": ...
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“For no other reason than” vs. “for no other reason that” vs. “for no other reason than that”

I am looking for a comprehensive analysis of these three constructions: ... for no other reason than X. ... for no other reason that X. ... for no other reason than that X. Which is ...
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Conjunction use: “and” or “or” in list of examples

When giving a list of examples, it seems to me "and" should be used because all the items in the list are examples, not just one of the items: I love fruit (e.g., apples, oranges, and bananas). ...
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Combination of independent clauses containing quantities

The Zaragoza-Ysleta International Bridge in El Paso, Texas, is one of the 330 ports of entry where customs officials inspect the more than 350 million travelers and 100 million vehicles, trains, ...
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“Either A, or B, or both”

I want to say that it's possible that at least one of {A,B} is true, and possibly both of them are true. Is it correct to phrase it as "either A, or B, or both are true".
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Why do we use a comma before “and”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Comma before last item in a list Often times, I find myself writing sentences like the following: "... to integrate four granularities of features: first, second, ...
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“Medicine is good when your family gives it to you not when your friend gives you one or when you take it by yourself”

I am editing a 5th grade paper. He has autism as well as some learning difficulties. He wrote: Medicine is good when your family gives it to you not when your friend gives you one or when you ...
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When should we use “and” and/or “and/or”?

Does anyone know when we should use and and when we should use and/or? Is and/or even official English? And when using it in conversation, do we actually pronounce "and" and "or" as such: Hey, ...
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How crazy can “and” be?

After seeing completely insane examples of "and" usage in this question , I realized that I have no clue how to use the word "and" grammatically: How far does the insanity go? Are the following ...
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“Julio and I” vs “I and Julio” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “My friends and I” vs. “My friends and me” vs. “Me and my friends” Is naming the first person last proper grammar or just proper manners? "Julio and I went to the ...