Conjunctions are words used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause, such as "and," "but," and "if."

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Function of “or” [closed]

A hot drink that is made with wine, beer, or cider, spices, sugar, and usually baked apples and is traditionally served in a large bowl especially at Christmastime (Merriam Webser-wassail) Is a ...
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Do certain contrasting conjunctions + certain contrasting adverbs = redundancy?

For example, would the following sentence with either ‘rather’ or ‘instead’ included in the middle (or, for that matter, with ‘instead’ alone at the end) be redundant. If a redundancy, would it rise ...
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84 views

The use of OR in interrogative sentences

Is Indonesia a developing country or an underdeveloped country? Or Is Indonesia a developing or an underdeveloped country? I understand that "or" is either inclusive or exclusive. Is there ...
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100 views

“The set is empty and [is] ordered”

Which is correct? The set is empty and is ordered. The set is empty and ordered.
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What is the proper usage of “however” and where is it placed? [duplicate]

What is the correct usage of however; and however? I sometimes find myself not really checking my email on a daily basis but, I do however; find this to be very helpful to keep up with what's ...
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Conjunction confusion

folks. I'm back again with another grammatical quandary. I recently encountered this statement: "...cuts to the bone and through the heart.", which I called into question in a strictly anatomical ...
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Pesky 'that' removal - what is this construction generally known as?

Recently seen: There is an expression I think comes from ... Others have told me (that) such a construction is wrong, but I am sure (that) it is OK. An editor decided it was grammatically ...
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such as something vs. such something as

The original one: From the view point of outstanding teachers such as John... From the view point of such outstanding teachers as John ... From the view point of outstanding teachers such John as... ...
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“It was great because of improving my English.”

"It was great because of improving my English." A non-native speaker produced this sentence recently in a piece of writing, “it” being an English language course that she had attended a few years ...
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Is there any difference between “like” and “as”?

Why is it not right to say: He speaks like his father does. But it’s quite correct to say: He speaks like his father. He speaks as his father does.
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136 views

“Informed that X is as follows” vs “Informed of X is as follows” [closed]

I am making a report to management. Which is the more appropriate expression? Please be informed that the above results are as follows. Please be informed of the above results are as follows.
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167 views

“…and who knew?” or “…,and, who knew…” or “…, and who knew…”?

Maybe by joining that religion I'd be able to understand myself, and who knew? Maybe I'd find the meaning of life. Maybe by joining that religion I'd be able to understand myself, and, who ...
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“With all that said” in spoken English, contradict or not?

I know "with that said" or "that being said" or "having said that" can be used as an alternative to "though" in written English, to introduce something that will contradict what has been previously ...
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What great writers have used coordinating conjunctions at the start of sentences?

I had a discussion today with a friend over the validity of using (coordinating, correlative) conjunctions like but or and at the start of sentences. His position was that it breaks a rule of ...
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How should “vice versa” be conjoined to a negative prase that uses “cannot”?

In a passage of proposed programming language documentation I was reading today, I came across this sentence: Strings cannot directly be compared with binary sequences, and vice versa! The "and" ...
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219 views

Are “till” and “until” perfectly interchangeable at the beginning of a sentence?

In the following sentences, would one of these conjunctions sound better than the other ? Until/Till my daughter got married, I had never been abroad. Until/Till you change your mind, I won't ...
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53 views

Does the word “too” in a series of items decide the placement of the conjunction?

Original: A boy, a girl and a dog too went for a walk. Would the original or the following be better, or does it change the meaning? A boy and a girl, and a dog too went for a walk. Is ...
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I don't like potatoes or ice-cream [closed]

I am struggling to find the correct grammar for a fairly simple sentence. "I don't like potatoes or ice-cream". This appears to be incorrect because it is a contraction of the two clauses "I ...
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267 views

“Big black eyes” vs. “big and black eyes” [duplicate]

I've heard many people say "big black eyes," and I'm curious whether or not we must put an and in-between big and black. To me, since big and black are describing eyes, it is necessary to put an and ...
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97 views

Using “and” twice for four items

What is the best way to say that a book treats single variable differential calculus, single variable integral calculus, multivariable differential calculus and multivariable integral calculus? I can ...
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202 views

“Not only . . . but (also)” correlative conjunction question

The amount of jobs that have been transferred out of state in the past five years is staggering; not only manufacturing jobs but white-collar ones have moved as well. Is this appropriate usage of ...
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33 views

Singular vs plural: the effect of conjunctions [duplicate]

Consider: Please check that the username and password is correct. Please check that the username and password are correct. If I had to break the statement into its parts: Please check that the ...
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309 views

“so” or “therefore”

I usually double check my English using Google Translate. I paste my phrase in English (translated by myself) and I see how it translates it back to Italian. If the meaning is the one I had in mind ...
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Capitalising “for” depending on the usage in the title?

Prepositions are not capitalised in titles. Subordinate conjunctions are capitalised. The word “for”, as per Oxford, is mostly a preposition but can also be a conjunction (I assume subordinating ...
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3answers
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Precise meaning of “fourfold”

I got into a disagreement with someone about the meaning of the word "fourfold." His contention is that it means up to four times as many whereas my contention is that it means four times as many, no ...
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64 views

Using “the/a/an” with “and” and “or” [duplicate]

Suppose I need to mention two nouns in a phrase so that they are joined with either "and" or "or". Do I use "the/a/an" with the both of the nouns or just with the first one?
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Syntax of “not only” + “furthermore”

Can I use not only with furthermore instead of also? Not only is he tall, he is also heavy. Can I say or write: Not only is he tall, he is furthermore heavy. or (and please tell me if this ...
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What is the grammatical role of a word like “Thus” at the beginning of a sentance [closed]

What is the grammatical role of a word like "Thus", "Therefore", or "So" at the start of a sentance? I was born in the US. "Therefore" I am an American citizen. It's not an article... it's not a ...
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Is it grammatical to split either/or into different sentences?

I came across the following sentence in Wikipedia: The bitangent lines can be constructed either by constructing the homothetic centers, as described at that article, and then constructing the ...
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3answers
177 views

Trouble understanding the meaning of sentences with “unless” [closed]

I am having trouble understanding the meaning of sentences using unless. Here is an example: Unless I hear from you by 6pm Friday I will send the letters to main office. What does the above ...
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“I'm going to help you like I promised.” Good English? Informal? Only colloquially acceptable? Wrong? [duplicate]

I've often heard this kind of sentence where one substitutes the conjunction "like" for "as". Is it acceptable in written English? Is it considered wrong in spoken English?
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118 views

Using a comma before “and we already have a toaster.” [duplicate]

Which of the following is correct? No gifts please, we don't need any orchids and we already have a toaster. No gifts please, we don't need any orchids , and we already have a toaster.
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Different from x Different to x Different than [duplicate]

In the following sentence: "When I visited my old school after so many years, it looked completely different in the classrooms and the backyard /from what/to what/than/ it had been when I was a ...
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Which word(s) does “nuclear” modify in “by nuclear action or radiation or radioactive contamination”

Is the word nuclear assumed after the "or" in the following sentence? "by nuclear action or radiation or radioactive contamination" In other words, does the or assume that the nuclear applies to ...
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230 views

“as to + verb” vs “to + verb”

Are there any differences between these two forms? Example: "It has been done so as + to make it easier for academics and other judges to refer to a particular passage in a judicial ...
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1k views

Correct use of “albeit”, particularly with regard to commas

I’m not quite sure that the following sentence is gramatically correct. If it is, I wonder where I should put the comma or commas in the sentence using albeit. Obesity rates amongst men, whose ...
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Clause applying to first part of sentence when 'and' is used?

The requirement referred to in the first subparagraph shall not apply to fund of funds structures and master-feeder structures where the underlying funds have a depositary which provides ownership ...
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What does “v.” stand for? [closed]

In in the following sentence, what does the "v." stand for? The new system was partially indebted to Stanley v. Georgia Does it mean "Stanley and Georgia" or "Stanley against Georgia"?
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176 views

Order of pronouns and proper names in a sentence

Which is correct? Because he reads, Bob knows a lot. or: Because Bob reads, he knows a lot. Assuming the former, the follow-up question is, what happens with "when", "as", "after" and ...
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632 views

Comma before “and so”

I encountered the following two examples: Moreover, the proposed scheme is designed in an ID-based setting and so the necessity for certificates and some related problems are eliminated. Our ...
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Necessity of “that” as a conjunction

A simple Google search reveals that the word that can be used in many ways: as a pronoun, determiner, adverb and conjunction. I'm wondering about its usage specifically as a conjunction. Take the ...
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Starting a sentence with two subordinating conjunctions

Is it grammatical to start a sentence with two subordinating conjunctions? For example: Because if it rains tomorrow, I will get wet, I hoped for a sunny day. It seems wrong to start a sentence ...
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“Due to” vs. ”Because of” [duplicate]

I would please like to know which of the following sentences is the more accurate, and why that is so: Due to recent economic problems, it has been difficult for many to find a job. Because of ...
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1answer
251 views

Using “respectively” with “and” vs. “or”

Is it acceptable usage to use "or" with "respectively", or is it possible only with "and"? Example: If the light changes from red to blue or from blue to red, you must catch or throw the ball, ...
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Why would you call “before” a preposition when it precedes a clause?

I'm new here & don't know all the etiquette & ins & outs, but I have a question about something posted in another thread. Modern grammar, however, recognises that prepositions can take ...
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1answer
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What are the rules for combining verbs with and?

I am curious what the rules for combining verbs into a "compound verb" are. For example, is it proper to combine "guess and check" into a single verb as in: I guessed and checked that the answer ...
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Is “and with” grammatical in this sentence?

We have registered nurses working on site with a nutritional background to provide weight loss advice to clients and with at least a 2 year working experience. Is the part in bold grammatical?
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Using prepositions and conjunctions in a sentence

Which one of the following example sentences are correct/more appropriate? It is better to laugh than cry. It is better to laugh than to cry. Some general tips would be helpful.
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“the boy Sam and Tom” or “the boys Sam and Tom”? [closed]

I do not know the grammatical terms for this kind of usage. I can only give an example. I want to describe two boys called Sam and Tom. Of course I can just say Sam and Tom are nice. But I ...
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As fast as Or As fast

He is as clever if not cleverer than his brother. Ranjeet is as fast as or perhaps faster than Rohit. Are both these sentences correct? As per Wren And Martin High School English Grammar ...