20
votes
10answers
6k views

I don't like potatoes or ice-cream [closed]

I am struggling to find the correct grammar for a fairly simple sentence. "I don't like potatoes or ice-cream". This appears to be incorrect because it is a contraction of the two clauses "I ...
6
votes
1answer
117 views

Concessive “as much as” and “much as”. Which came first?

Related: "Much though" vs "much as", Use of 'Much as' [closed], Using “as much as” at start of sentence Consider the following two variations: As much as I hate to admit it, I cannot swim. ...
2
votes
2answers
347 views

As Well As - Tense Change?

Consider a sentence such as the following: The new software was designed to increase programmer productivity as well as reducing the company's total invested cost. Note the two separate ...
2
votes
0answers
827 views

Use of “any more than” to relate two different situations [closed]

In the following quote by Billy Sunday “Going to church doesn’t make you a Christian any more than going to a garage makes you an automobile.” can anyone pls explain/elaborate the usage and meaning of ...
5
votes
1answer
3k views

“For no other reason than” vs. “for no other reason that” vs. “for no other reason than that”

I am looking for a comprehensive analysis of these three constructions: ... for no other reason than X. ... for no other reason that X. ... for no other reason than that X. Which is ...
16
votes
3answers
3k views

“to be all but X”

What does "all but" mean in this expression? Today, under pressure from P2P distribution, optical disc piracy in wealthy countries is "all but eliminated" and profit margins elsewhere are slim. ...
12
votes
1answer
2k views

The construction of “Known but to God”

The Tomb of the Unknown Solider has the engraving "KNOWN BUT TO GOD", as presumably no man knows his name, but shouldn't it read "unknown, but to God", as the default for everyone is "unknown", with ...
6
votes
1answer
229 views

Need help understanding phrases of the form “x if y”

I regularly find myself confused by phrases of the form "x if y". For example, in the 2010-10-22 issue of his newsletter, Paul Thurrott writes: Well, if you're Wall Street Journal technology maven ...