Conjunctions are words used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause, such as "and," "but," and "if."

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Ending a clause with “but”

In an office email, I am trying to write a qualifying clause while leading into an exception to that clause in the same sentence. While this is an office email, and therefore informality is somewhat ...
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39 views

Conjunctive usage with negative imperatives: i.e., 'and' and 'or.' Don't eat and drink on the bus vs. Don't eat or drink on the bus

I tried searching for conjunctive usage within negative imperatives but was unable to find any results. I may have just used the wrong search string. My question is as follows. In the following ...
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2answers
47 views

Repeating determiners: “the X and (the) Y”

I have a problem with the use of "the" after "and" where you would basically be connecting words. For example, which of the following is better: The table and the chairs? The table and chairs? ...
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36 views

Grammatical number for nouns, separated by 'or', in an interrogative?

Let S denote a singular noun and P a plural. Then in an interrogative, how do you determine the verb's grammatical number? I recollect that I read a claim, possibly on ELU, that in a declarative ...
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1answer
37 views

Even though versus Even so [closed]

I cannot understand why we cannot use "even though" instead of "even so" or vice versa. For example : I know her English isn't very good, but even so I can understand her. ( original sentence) ...
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467 views

Can I use “lest” in the following sentence?

I am not a native English speaker/writer, but I am working on a technical thesis written in English. To me, for some unknown reason, it feels natural to write the following: However, the ...
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1answer
60 views

Correct use of the superlative degree [closed]

Kindly tell me whether I used the superlative degree correctly in these two sentences: He enjoyed all the sweetest and         most charming scenery. He enjoyed all the sweetest and the most ...
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2answers
82 views

Doing two things at once without conjuction

Are the following sentence, for two things going on at once, grammatically correct? Tom is doing laundry singing a song. It is not easy to go to school working part-time. I saw an accident riding my ...
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1answer
72 views

Is Ann Patchett married to her dog? [closed]

In a short review on the occasion of the release of her new book in paperback, This Is The Story of a Happy Marriage, by Ann Patchett, the New York Times reviewer wrote: These sparkling personal ...
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1answer
45 views

Using co-ordinating conjunctions

My question is about the below sentence. Punctuation omitted. If the man comes back and I am home I will arrest him In the sentence there is one dependant subordinate clause and two independant ...
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143 views

..until the issue will be resolved. WILL?

I always thought you cannot use a future tense after "until" or "unless". But recently, in a very famous IT system, I found the following: An estimate of how much work remains until this issue ...
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68 views

Writing two sentences or using “which” as a conjunction

I am writing a scientific article and I asked my self several times, which of the following examples is better style: One approach for getting from one place to another one is driving a car. A car ...
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345 views

Is it correct to use “or” in place of “and/or”?

Consider the following sentence: A project is a large and/or complex undertaking. To me, the expression “and/or” seems redundant since in formal logic “or” implies ...
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81 views

Until, till, as long as

I will not go to the garden until my mother allows me I will not go to the garden as long as my mother doesn't allow me I will not go to the garden till my mother allows me: Are these sentences the ...
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3answers
80 views

Need help identifying subject in sentence with a conjunction

Currently, I am involved in a disagreement as to interpreting the grammatical meaning of the following sentence: “Restores 10% of Att as HP in battle.” Given that “Att” and “HP” are nouns (with ...
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1answer
51 views

Starting a book with this sentence, is it ok? [closed]

I'd like to start a book with a sentence like this: This book is about X, so why should it start with Y? In fact, the book is already written, but I'd like to get the first few pages absolutely ...
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59 views

Meaning of “or” in “working on applications to sell or for any other purpose”

A licence reads: If you are an individual working on your own applications to sell or for any other purpose, you may use the software to develop and test those applications. I'm having ...
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33 views

What does the comma before the conjunction “or” mean in the following sentence (i.e. “…Software, or to create a business…”)?

What does the comma before the conjunction "or" mean in the following sentence (i.e. "...Software, or to create a business...")? You have no right to resell our Content or media from any source, as ...
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46 views

Complex usage of “nor” and explanation

I'm positive this is an acceptable usage of "nor," but I can't find a rule that explains the usage. Please help! He was too tired to walk to the next open crossing. Nor to start an argument.
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30 views

How to use for as a conjunction [closed]

When I recall the short way of remembering a list of the conjunctions, FANBOYS, for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so, how could for be used as a conjunction? Could it be used in Justin and Mark could ...
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5answers
145 views

Even though + Adverb usage

I'm not sure if these sample sentences below are grammatically incorrect, but they sound very odd to me. I couldn't see the man even though actually he was there. He still got hit even though ...
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4answers
45 views

Discerning between as and so?

I would appreciate it, if someone readily explain the difference between these. As, I yet to get what the first one means precisely, I had to broach such a discussion. UPDATED: The world was created ...
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Non-Adverbial “as is”

I know the common adverbial usage of "as is" as in, Leave it as is. As a non-native English speaker I found a strange-to-me but common English usage of non-adverbial "as is" and sometimes also "as ...
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71 views

Function of “or” [closed]

A hot drink that is made with wine, beer, or cider, spices, sugar, and usually baked apples and is traditionally served in a large bowl especially at Christmastime (Merriam Webser-wassail) Is a ...
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41 views

Do certain contrasting conjunctions + certain contrasting adverbs = redundancy?

For example, would the following sentence with either ‘rather’ or ‘instead’ included in the middle (or, for that matter, with ‘instead’ alone at the end) be redundant. If a redundancy, would it rise ...
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The use of OR in interrogative sentences

Is Indonesia a developing country or an underdeveloped country? Or Is Indonesia a developing or an underdeveloped country? I understand that "or" is either inclusive or exclusive. Is there ...
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“The set is empty and [is] ordered”

Which is correct? The set is empty and is ordered. The set is empty and ordered.
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23 views

What is the proper usage of “however” and where is it placed? [duplicate]

What is the correct usage of however; and however? I sometimes find myself not really checking my email on a daily basis but, I do however; find this to be very helpful to keep up with what's ...
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74 views

Conjunction confusion

folks. I'm back again with another grammatical quandary. I recently encountered this statement: "...cuts to the bone and through the heart.", which I called into question in a strictly anatomical ...
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2answers
147 views

Pesky 'that' removal - what is this construction generally known as?

Recently seen: There is an expression I think comes from ... Others have told me (that) such a construction is wrong, but I am sure (that) it is OK. An editor decided it was grammatically ...
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149 views

such as something vs. such something as

The original one: From the view point of outstanding teachers such as John... From the view point of such outstanding teachers as John ... From the view point of outstanding teachers such John as... ...
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3answers
204 views

“It was great because of improving my English.”

"It was great because of improving my English." A non-native speaker produced this sentence recently in a piece of writing, “it” being an English language course that she had attended a few years ...
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75 views

Is there any difference between “like” and “as”?

Why is it not right to say: He speaks like his father does. But it’s quite correct to say: He speaks like his father. He speaks as his father does.
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115 views

“Informed that X is as follows” vs “Informed of X is as follows” [closed]

I am making a report to management. Which is the more appropriate expression? Please be informed that the above results are as follows. Please be informed of the above results are as follows.
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119 views

“…and who knew?” or “…,and, who knew…” or “…, and who knew…”?

Maybe by joining that religion I'd be able to understand myself, and who knew? Maybe I'd find the meaning of life. Maybe by joining that religion I'd be able to understand myself, and, who ...
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2k views

“With all that said” in spoken English, contradict or not?

I know "with that said" or "that being said" or "having said that" can be used as an alternative to "though" in written English, to introduce something that will contradict what has been previously ...
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What great writers have used coordinating conjunctions at the start of sentences?

I had a discussion today with a friend over the validity of using (coordinating, correlative) conjunctions like but or and at the start of sentences. His position was that it breaks a rule of ...
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How should “vice versa” be conjoined to a negative prase that uses “cannot”?

In a passage of proposed programming language documentation I was reading today, I came across this sentence: Strings cannot directly be compared with binary sequences, and vice versa! The "and" ...
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107 views

Are “till” and “until” perfectly interchangeable at the beginning of a sentence?

In the following sentences, would one of these conjunctions sound better than the other ? Until/Till my daughter got married, I had never been abroad. Until/Till you change your mind, I won't ...
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49 views

Does the word “too” in a series of items decide the placement of the conjunction?

Original: A boy, a girl and a dog too went for a walk. Would the original or the following be better, or does it change the meaning? A boy and a girl, and a dog too went for a walk. Is ...
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I don't like potatoes or ice-cream [closed]

I am struggling to find the correct grammar for a fairly simple sentence. "I don't like potatoes or ice-cream". This appears to be incorrect because it is a contraction of the two clauses "I ...
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220 views

“Big black eyes” vs. “big and black eyes” [duplicate]

I've heard many people say "big black eyes," and I'm curious whether or not we must put an and in-between big and black. To me, since big and black are describing eyes, it is necessary to put an and ...
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3answers
92 views

Using “and” twice for four items

What is the best way to say that a book treats single variable differential calculus, single variable integral calculus, multivariable differential calculus and multivariable integral calculus? I can ...
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1answer
155 views

“Not only . . . but (also)” correlative conjunction question

The amount of jobs that have been transferred out of state in the past five years is staggering; not only manufacturing jobs but white-collar ones have moved as well. Is this appropriate usage of ...
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Singular vs plural: the effect of conjunctions [duplicate]

Consider: Please check that the username and password is correct. Please check that the username and password are correct. If I had to break the statement into its parts: Please check that the ...
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177 views

“so” or “therefore”

I usually double check my English using Google Translate. I paste my phrase in English (translated by myself) and I see how it translates it back to Italian. If the meaning is the one I had in mind ...
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53 views

Capitalising “for” depending on the usage in the title?

Prepositions are not capitalised in titles. Subordinate conjunctions are capitalised. The word “for”, as per Oxford, is mostly a preposition but can also be a conjunction (I assume subordinating ...
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Precise meaning of “fourfold”

I got into a disagreement with someone about the meaning of the word "fourfold." His contention is that it means up to four times as many whereas my contention is that it means four times as many, no ...
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53 views

Using “the/a/an” with “and” and “or” [duplicate]

Suppose I need to mention two nouns in a phrase so that they are joined with either "and" or "or". Do I use "the/a/an" with the both of the nouns or just with the first one?
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130 views

Syntax of “not only” + “furthermore”

Can I use not only with furthermore instead of also? Not only is he tall, he is also heavy. Can I say or write: Not only is he tall, he is furthermore heavy. or (and please tell me if this ...