Conjunctions are words used to connect clauses or sentences or to coordinate words in the same clause, such as "and," "but," and "if."

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such as something vs such something as

Then such a scramble as there is to get abroad, and to get ashore, and to take in freight and to discharge freight!" Mark Twain Greetings. I am wondering if I have correctly rephrased the red part ...
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What great writers have used conjunctions at the start of sentences?

I had a discussion today with a friend over the validity of using conjunctions like but or and at the start of sentences. His position was that it breaks a rule of grammar, however I remembered a ...
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How should “vice versa” be conjoined to a negative prase that uses “cannot”?

In a passage of proposed programming language documentation I was reading today, I came across this sentence: Strings cannot directly be compared with binary sequences, and vice versa! The "and" ...
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54 views

How to use “while” in the present perfect [on hold]

Is my use of the present perfect and while correct, in the sentence below? If not, what is wrong with it? Do I need to use a different tense? I have taken food for you while I was coming
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1answer
47 views

Are “till” and “until” perfectly interchangeable at the beginning of a sentence?

In the following sentences, would one of these conjunctions sound better than the other ? Until/Till my daughter got married, I had never been abroad. Until/Till you change your mind, I won't ...
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25 views

Does the word “too” in a series of items decide the placement of the conjunction?

Original: A boy, a girl and a dog too went for a walk. Would the original or the following be better, or does it change the meaning? A boy and a girl, and a dog too went for a walk. Is ...
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10answers
6k views

I don't like potatoes or ice-cream [closed]

I am struggling to find the correct grammar for a fairly simple sentence. "I don't like potatoes or ice-cream". This appears to be incorrect because it is a contraction of the two clauses "I ...
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3answers
92 views

“Big black eyes” vs. “big and black eyes” [duplicate]

I've heard many people say "big black eyes," and I'm curious whether or not we must put an and in-between big and black. To me, since big and black are describing eyes, it is necessary to put an and ...
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3answers
61 views

Using “and” twice for four items

What is the best way to say that a book treats single variable differential calculus, single variable integral calculus, multivariable differential calculus and multivariable integral calculus? I can ...
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1answer
39 views

“Not only . . . but (also)” correlative conjunction question

The amount of jobs that have been transferred out of state in the past five years is staggering; not only manufacturing jobs but white-collar ones have moved as well. Is this appropriate usage of ...
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31 views

Singular vs plural: the effect of conjunctions [duplicate]

Consider: Please check that the username and password is correct. Please check that the username and password are correct. If I had to break the statement into its parts: Please check that the ...
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2answers
64 views

“so” or “therefore”

I usually double check my English using Google Translate. I paste my phrase in English (translated by myself) and I see how it translates it back to Italian. If the meaning is the one I had in mind ...
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30 views

Capitalising “for” depending on the usage in the title?

Prepositions are not capitalised in titles. Subordinate conjunctions are capitalised. The word “for”, as per Oxford, is mostly a preposition but can also be a conjunction (I assume subordinating ...
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3answers
62 views

Precise meaning of “fourfold”

I got into a disagreement with someone about the meaning of the word "fourfold." His contention is that it means up to four times as many whereas my contention is that it means four times as many, no ...
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1answer
30 views

Using “the/a/an” with “and” and “or” [duplicate]

Suppose I need to mention two nouns in a phrase so that they are joined with either "and" or "or". Do I use "the/a/an" with the both of the nouns or just with the first one?
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43 views

Syntax of “not only” + “furthermore”

Can I use not only with furthermore instead of also? Not only is he tall, he is also heavy. Can I say or write: Not only is he tall, he is furthermore heavy. or (and please tell me if this ...
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1answer
36 views

What is the grammatical role of a word like “Thus” at the beginning of a sentance [closed]

What is the grammatical role of a word like "Thus", "Therefore", or "So" at the start of a sentance? I was born in the US. "Therefore" I am an American citizen. It's not an article... it's not a ...
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4answers
377 views

Is it grammatical to split either/or into different sentences?

I came across the following sentence in Wikipedia: The bitangent lines can be constructed either by constructing the homothetic centers, as described at that article, and then constructing the ...
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What's the correct usage? [duplicate]

Would it be "people like us", or "people like we?" For instance, When we arrived at the party we immediately noticed that there were many people like we/us!
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3answers
58 views

Trouble understanding the meaning of sentences with “unless” [closed]

I am having trouble understanding the meaning of sentences using unless. Here is an example: Unless I hear from you by 6pm Friday I will send the letters to main office. What does the above ...
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3answers
253 views

“I'm going to help you like I promised.” Good English? Informal? Only colloquially acceptable? Wrong? [duplicate]

I've often heard this kind of sentence where one substitutes the conjunction "like" for "as". Is it acceptable in written English? Is it considered wrong in spoken English?
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1answer
65 views

Using a comma before “and we already have a toaster.” [duplicate]

Which of the following is correct? No gifts please, we don't need any orchids and we already have a toaster. No gifts please, we don't need any orchids , and we already have a toaster.
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2answers
48 views

Different from x Different to x Different than [duplicate]

In the following sentence: "When I visited my old school after so many years, it looked completely different in the classrooms and the backyard /from what/to what/than/ it had been when I was a ...
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2answers
112 views

“as to + verb” vs “to + verb”

Are there any differences between these two forms? Example: "It has been done so as + to make it easier for academics and other judges to refer to a particular passage in a judicial ...
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1answer
74 views

Correct use of “albeit”, particularly with regard to commas

I’m not quite sure that the following sentence is gramatically correct. If it is, I wonder where I should put the comma or commas in the sentence using albeit. Obesity rates amongst men, whose ...
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2answers
37 views

Clause applying to first part of sentence when 'and' is used?

The requirement referred to in the first subparagraph shall not apply to fund of funds structures and master-feeder structures where the underlying funds have a depositary which provides ownership ...
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1answer
170 views

What does “v.” stand for? [closed]

In in the following sentence, what does the "v." stand for? The new system was partially indebted to Stanley v. Georgia Does it mean "Stanley and Georgia" or "Stanley against Georgia"?
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2answers
71 views

Order of pronouns and proper names in a sentence

Which is correct? Because he reads, Bob knows a lot. or: Because Bob reads, he knows a lot. Assuming the former, the follow-up question is, what happens with "when", "as", "after" and ...
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2answers
75 views

Comma before “and so”

I encountered the following two examples: Moreover, the proposed scheme is designed in an ID-based setting and so the necessity for certificates and some related problems are eliminated. Our ...
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2answers
91 views

Necessity of “that” as a conjunction

A simple Google search reveals that the word that can be used in many ways: as a pronoun, determiner, adverb and conjunction. I'm wondering about its usage specifically as a conjunction. Take the ...
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3answers
158 views

Starting a sentence with two subordinating conjunctions

Is it grammatical to start a sentence with two subordinating conjunctions? For example: Because if it rains tomorrow, I will get wet, I hoped for a sunny day. It seems wrong to start a sentence ...
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0answers
20 views

“Due to” vs. ”Because of” [duplicate]

I would please like to know which of the following sentences is the more accurate, and why that is so: Due to recent economic problems, it has been difficult for many to find a job. Because of ...
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1answer
40 views

Using “respectively” with “and” vs. “or”

Is it acceptable usage to use "or" with "respectively", or is it possible only with "and"? Example: If the light changes from red to blue or from blue to red, you must catch or throw the ball, ...
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1answer
62 views

Why would you call “before” a preposition when it precedes a clause?

I'm new here & don't know all the etiquette & ins & outs, but I have a question about something posted in another thread. Modern grammar, however, recognises that prepositions can take ...
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1answer
86 views

What are the rules for combining verbs with and?

I am curious what the rules for combining verbs into a "compound verb" are. For example, is it proper to combine "guess and check" into a single verb as in: I guessed and checked that the answer ...
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1answer
34 views

Is “and with” grammatical in this sentence?

We have registered nurses working on site with a nutritional background to provide weight loss advice to clients and with at least a 2 year working experience. Is the part in bold grammatical?
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55 views

Using prepositions and conjunctions in a sentence

Which one of the following example sentences are correct/more appropriate? It is better to laugh than cry. It is better to laugh than to cry. Some general tips would be helpful.
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37 views

“the boy Sam and Tom” or “the boys Sam and Tom”? [closed]

I do not know the grammatical terms for this kind of usage. I can only give an example. I want to describe two boys called Sam and Tom. Of course I can just say Sam and Tom are nice. But I ...
2
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2answers
85 views

As fast as Or As fast

He is as clever if not cleverer than his brother. Ranjeet is as fast as or perhaps faster than Rohit. Are both these sentences correct? As per Wren And Martin High School English Grammar ...
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1answer
51 views

Would you start this with “however” or “but”? [closed]

The Chicago Manual (2013) calls however a "ponderous" way to begin a sentence, while but is more direct--it has more "impact." So let's put this stricture to the test with a sentence from UPenn's ...
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1answer
58 views

For as a coordinate connector

In this sentence "for" is used as coordinate connector, so therefore, both before and after "for" should be a complete clause right? "Despite its small size and slow gait, the wolverine is an ...
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1answer
106 views

Concessive “as much as” and “much as”. Which came first?

Related: "Much though" vs "much as", Use of 'Much as' [closed], Using “as much as” at start of sentence Consider the following two variations: As much as I hate to admit it, I cannot swim. ...
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4answers
797 views

is there anything wrong with “from my perspective” [closed]

Is the expression "from my perspective" good English? I was always under the impression that "perspective" refers to what someone else can see (i.e. a third person), and that if you wanted to refer to ...
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2answers
70 views

Conjoiners vs conjunctions vs articles

I've heard that conjoiners (in terms of grammar) are similar to articles. According to sources, articles can be words such as the, an, a, some (in unique cases). Conjunctions can be and, but, as well ...
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3answers
40 views

Is it correct to write “…, so…”? Is it formal to use “so” in writing?

Is it correct to write "..., so..."? e.g. You are handsome, so you are appreciated. Is it correct to use "so" in formal writing? If not, what are the alternatives?
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2answers
39 views

Should there be punctuation before “and” in this sentence?

Perhaps this is a better sample: J, says, “No!” and Page furrows her forehead, and walks with J to the other side of the room. Would either of these be better? J, says, “No!” Page furrows ...
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meaning of “yet” “as if”

I don't understand the second part of this sentence: The Berlin Congress of 1878 and the first set of frontiers drawn on maps ignored key components of local life, and yet they were drawn as ...
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2answers
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A relative adverb or a conjunction or both?

I am not familiar with the idea that an adverb can function as a conjunction at the same time. Here are a couple of sentences that are confusing me. This is the reason why she left him. ...and ...
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2answers
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It the phrase “They identify themselves as Pacifist, but the EU as an arrogant power” grammatical?

Is this phrase grammatical? They identify themselves as Pacifist, but the EU as an arrogant power. Is a verb necessary in the second part of the sentence?
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Usage of 'and' between more than two items

Beijing will face trade sanctions from the United States, which brought the case, and the European Union and Japan. vs Beijing will face trade sanctions from the United States, which brought ...