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1
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0answers
48 views

Concept of “none” in the English language [duplicate]

None of them are/is I don't know if this is the place to ask, but: In German you would say "none of them is" and it totally sounds wrong to me to say "none of them are". As German and English ...
3
votes
5answers
98 views

The phenomenon of someone talking about someone else all the time

I got a friend who keeps talking about a colleague. My friend is pretty disappointed by the other guy's behaviour and keeps on harping about it day in day out. Is there one word/concept which sums up ...
0
votes
4answers
81 views

Is there a different way of saying “Steam Engine Time”?

Steam engine time shows up on urban dictionary, but isn't quite as prevalent beyond that. I'm trying to remember the name of the concept that it's "time" for something to get invented when all the ...
1
vote
4answers
392 views

big to small, and small to big approach names

In a book, I read: Engineering is all about breaking down big problems into smaller ones and putting the solutions for those problems back together. My generalized interpretation of this text ...
0
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1answer
82 views

Can parents “educate” their children? Or only teachers? [closed]

Many of my Asian students who are learning English say that parents can "educate" their children. However I'm not sure if this is a correct collocation in English. My understanding of "education" is ...
-1
votes
2answers
72 views

Is there any difference between deputies & lawmakers? [closed]

As a non-native speaker quite often I get in trouble with slight differences between concepts. So, regarding to this doubt I think both of them are used to express the same thing but I'm not sure ...
0
votes
3answers
48 views

phrase request: describe authorship which overruns logical stopping points and/or fails to omit extraneous ideas

How can I describe authorship where the author often oversteps logical stopping points, or where the author introduces superfluous, tangentially related content? Here are some more details to ...
2
votes
5answers
126 views

Is there an English term for the concept of making grumpy noises like; “bah”?

In Swedish there's a word "fnysningar" which means "disaproved sniffs". I'm trying to think of a similar concept in English and I'm reminded of Christmas Carrol and Scrooge McDuck disapprovingly ...
1
vote
1answer
220 views

Etymology of “second to none”

second to none To the ears of a non-native speaker, mine anyway, this expression sounds very laborious. Where does it come from? Is it not contrary to the idea that English is a ...
4
votes
1answer
289 views

A theory or concept related to language use by elite or the higher classes

I'm an English teacher, and I'm looking for a theoretical model that suggests language is used differently by different classes. I am aware of Bernstein's Elaborated code, which refers to an elite ...
3
votes
1answer
93 views

What is the word for the combined senses of an organism?

I'm having difficulty recalling the word for the unique sensory space of an organism. Or it might be the word for the impression derived from those unique senses, I'm not totally sure. It would be ...
2
votes
3answers
500 views

Expression for asking a question in a way that assumes a certain solution?

Especially (but not only) with technical problems, people often ask questions in a way that assumes a certain solution. For example: Where can I get a cheap taxi to the airport? But the person ...
3
votes
4answers
143 views

Can a tractor or a skid-steer be called a “device”?

I am having an argument with my cousin after I called a tractor a "device." He argues that tractors are machines, but never "devices." Thoughts, folks?
1
vote
1answer
87 views

odd taxonomy of English [closed]

The taxonomy of ox, like cow, bull, calf, steer, bullock, cattle, etc. is all odd to me, using different words for the same animal. (The same can be said to sheep.) I'm looking for similar ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

Can a number be given the attribute 'physical'?

This question initially arose while translating a technical document from German. The original text was 'physikalische Heizzonenummer', literally 'physical heating-zone-number'. My immediate reaction ...
3
votes
3answers
800 views

What is the term for an idea that requires/creates its opposite?

An example would be that the concept of 'light' necessitates an opposite: 'dark.' The idea of one entails the other. Is there a term for this?