Questions about words that are created by combining two or more other words together.

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2
votes
3answers
99 views

What is the combining form of “Christian”?

I recently heard the term "Judeo-Christian" which caused a thought to strike me. I don't know how to switch the order of the classical compound (word). What is the combining form of "Christian"? ...
1
vote
1answer
34 views

Should the names of different sorting algorithms be “<qualifier> sort” or “<qualifier>sort”?

Should the names of different sorting algorithms be <qualifier> sort or <qualifier>sort? The titles of Wikipedia articles of these sorting algorithms are not consistent with respect to ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Real Estate or Real-Estate? [closed]

Which is the correct way to write "Real Estate" - with or without hyphen? And when should we use hyphens?
2
votes
1answer
57 views

Is it correct to say “Yesterday night”? [duplicate]

I have heard a lot of people say "Yesterday night" is that considered correct? I have always said last night.
8
votes
3answers
19k views

Timepoint vs. time point

When speaking of a point in time, what would be the proper usage: "Timepoint" vs. "Time point"? This funny confusion comes from my life as a programmer: While one of our style checkers enforces ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

Why the “meat” in “sweetmeat”?

This has always confused me. Dictionary.com doesn't help at all. Candy and meat just don't go together that well.
0
votes
1answer
150 views

Would “pentaminutely” reflect an event that occurs every five minutes?

Would the compound pentaminutely (from penta- and minutely) be correct in describing an event that occurs every five-minutes? Or is there a better word? Edit: For clarity, I'm looking to name an ...
10
votes
3answers
214 views

What part-of-speech would a vehicle's year/make/model be?

Suppose I were to say this sentence: "I own a 2003 Ford F-150." Would 2003 Ford F-150 be a compound proper noun? Would Ford F-150 be a compound proper noun and 2003 be an adjective? Would F-150 be ...
-1
votes
1answer
53 views

What’s the correct hyphenation in “trying to be a decision maker”?

Which of these three ways of writing it is right: decision maker (a space separates the two pieces) decision-maker (a hyphen separates the two pieces) decisionmaker (nothing separates the two ...
1
vote
3answers
7k views

Can “whatever” be split into two words?

I tend to write, "say whatever they want", but I'm always tempted to write "say what ever they want". Is it acceptable to split the word in this context?
0
votes
2answers
73 views

Does one capitalize “Portuguese” when used in a hyphenated adjective? [closed]

When Portuguese is used as part of a hyphenated adjective, does it take an initial capital letter? Just checking on this while proofreading an article. Examples: portuguese-speaking college ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

On the Making of Decisions—Compound, Hyphen, or Space? [duplicate]

I'm responsible for most of the copy editing at my job. While it goes pretty smoothly most of the time, there is one area that keeps creating a bit of cognitive dissonance for me: decisionmaking ...
18
votes
12answers
1k views

An Exocentric compound for Children

I have written a story for children in Persian. Somewhere in the story, I have mentioned "pear". "Pear" In Farsi is gool-abbi, which translates literally as "blue flower". I have mentioned that as ...
10
votes
5answers
1k views

In English you have 'above', 'on', 'over' and 'on top of' but in Italian one word, 'sopra', covers all four meanings

In Italian if I were to say, "sopra l'albero" (albero = tree) you might rightly ask: "Yes but where, exactly?" But "sopra" is a great word to learn in Italian, not only is it a very flexible ...
1
vote
4answers
142 views

Do I keep myself “up-to-date” or “up to date” on something?

Question is quite straightforward. I want to say that "I keep myself up-to-date on the latest technology". Or is it better "I keep myself up to date with the latest technology"? Thanks
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Young Surveyors Network or Young Surveyor Network? [duplicate]

I'm a surveyor and we are currently setting up our network. However, there seems to be a disagreement on the proper name of the group. The group is composed of young surveyors under the age of 35, ...
4
votes
2answers
594 views

Compound adjectives functioning as adverbs modifying other adjectives; is it possible and grammatical?

Soul-crushingly bad; heartbreakingly sad; bone-crunchingly violent; etc. I swear I have seen it done, but I am not sure whether it's proper grammar or not.
1
vote
2answers
81 views

Compound adverb — “kick-start a party soccer style”

I have asked this question in ELL site, but there were not much reply, and so I decided to ask the same question here. Though I will change the question a little bit to exactly what I need more and to ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Plural of feedback

I'm looking for a way to identify a specific amount of feedback items I'm visualizing in a list. The construction of the sentence needs to be generic, so I can't use something like Feedback received ...
8
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the difference between “onetime” and “one time”?

I was reading a book that had a sentence containing this: ...onetime commissioner of New York...
-1
votes
1answer
252 views

nominal compound/compound adjective

"The Duchess is a free(-)natured woman." In the above sentence is there a nominal compound? Can we write "a free-natured woman" using a hyphen? Are nominal compound and compound adjectives the ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Land cover, land-cover, or landcover?

In literature, I often see landcover, land cover, and even land-cover. Land cover seems slightly more prevalent than the others. Which is correct? Land cover is the material covering the Earth's ...
2
votes
4answers
1k views

Can “nighttime” be used instead of “night-time”?

I forgot where but I saw the word "night-time" written like "nighttime". Now is that correct or accepted? Can it be written as a single word? I am specifically concerned about British usage. I did ...
5
votes
1answer
395 views

How to hyphenate a negated compound noun?

We have a term for a process, "defect source assessment". We want to describe a set of processes that are not related to that process. Which of the following (if any) would be correct? non ...
2
votes
4answers
2k views

Englishman or English man?

Which group is correct (in British English)? Is there any difference? And which group do you use? Group 1 (the one I use) English man, English woman, English men, English women Irish man, Irish ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Should “two-week” be hyphenated in “a two-week all-expense-paid trip”? [duplicate]

Which is correct — "a two-week all-expense-paid trip" or "a two week all-expense-paid trip"?
1
vote
2answers
70 views

Is aquamarine considered to be a compound word?

We've been debating whether or not aquamarine is a compound word or not. To me, I view "aqua" as being just a prefix rather than a standalone word, so I don't think aquamarine would be considered to ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

When to make compound adjectives with adverbs?

I'm trying to figure out what style guidelines or rules apply to creating compound adjectives when adverbs are involved. Typically you create compound adjectives when there is potential for ambiguity ...
0
votes
1answer
129 views

“high-reliable”, “highly reliable”, or something else?

There was a discussion with my colleagues about a paper that I am currently writing and in which I use phrases like "a high-reliable system architecture". Some of my colleagues hold the view that this ...
2
votes
2answers
108 views

The suffix -hood

I am using the suffix -hood as both base and suffix to derive poetical meaning in an interplay of the words "...child and adult hood." Though this may offend the ear of the modern day reader, I ...
1
vote
1answer
114 views

Why do we say a “hotel room” and not a “hotel's room”? [closed]

I would like to know what the rule is to explain why we do not use the genitive construction hotel's room. Instead, we say "a hotel room". Other examples: a hospital bed a bike stand Would ...
1
vote
1answer
169 views

Hyphenation of a phrasal attributive with an open compound: “A B to C noun”

I'm wondering how to properly hyphenate (or en-dash) the following phrase: fiber optic to BNC converter That is to say, a device that converts "fiber optic" to BNC. If it didn't contain an open ...
1
vote
3answers
174 views

Does “the motor speed” mean the speed of the motor? [closed]

I'm an engineer and I often hear others say "the motor speed" when they are talking about the speed of the motor. For example, one might ask "What was the motor speed?" when he or she wants to know ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Does “I don’t have either late-night nor between-meal snacks” sound natural?

Does the sentence sound natural? I don’t have either late-night nor between-meal snacks.
2
votes
1answer
349 views

“High-schooler” vs. “high schooler”

My initial attempt to settle the question with a google search didn't help as much as I'd hoped: A search for 'high schooler' revealed approximately 4% of results employing the hyphenated form. A ...
2
votes
2answers
825 views

“Healthcare” or “Health care”?

Healthcare or Health care ? Which one is correct?
13
votes
4answers
963 views

Why is “wavelength” one word when “wave height” isn't?

Why is “wavelength” one word when “wave height” isn't? As another example, wave speed is two words. But wavelength is only one word. What is the reason for this? In Swedish and other contructs, ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Is it possible to use a hyphen in a listing (in a sentence) for abbreviation, even if the compound word consists of two separate words [duplicate]

I'm currently asking myself if it is possible to use "-" for abbreviation in a listing in a sentence to emphasize the togetherness of the previous words and the word in the end, even if they are two ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

Question on “Out of”

In "out of", is the "out" considered a preposition or an adverb?
7
votes
4answers
636 views

Why is “rollback it” incorrect?

I recently wrote the following sentence: Please roll it back. But if I were to describe the action on its own I would say: This rollback was due to objections by the original author. If I ...
3
votes
5answers
917 views

“Hostname” or “host name”?

When we are talking about computers, I see both hostname and host name being used. Which is more proper? Should I put the space in there?
2
votes
6answers
13k views

“One-to-one” vs. “one-on-one”

I said: "Tomorrow will be our one-to-one meeting with Mr.XYZ." My friend: "OK, one-on-one." Which is correct? One-to-one Or One-on-one
0
votes
3answers
138 views

Why is endpoint a word while startpoint is not?

My text editor complains when I type 'startpoint' and does not complain when I type 'endpoint'. Why does this difference exist and what should I use for each?
1
vote
1answer
102 views

“All X-related things” / “All things X-related” / “All things X related”?

My French origins (probably?) would have me intuitively write “all X-related things”, but it seems usage favours the construct “all things X-related”, or even without a hyphen: “all things X related” ...
7
votes
4answers
708 views

Compound Adjectives and -ed

A colleague asked me this question, and I couldn't come up with an answer that satisfied him, so I'm wondering if anyone can help: Why does a man with a short temper become a short-tempered man? In ...
12
votes
3answers
305 views

Term for words like Snowmageddon, Nipplegate and even cheeseburger?

Is there a term for words like Snowmageddon, Nipplegate and even cheeseburger? I know they're portmanteaus (or portmanteaux), but they seem to belong to a special class of portmanteau. In the title ...
-2
votes
1answer
77 views

How can “[blank] of [blank]” be condensed into one word? [closed]

Maybe I am not asking this the right way. For example, could "illusion of pain" be condensed into one word or by simply using fewer words? This is not to be "pain-illusion." That is too different. ...
3
votes
0answers
68 views

Why is “birthday” one word as opposed to two? “Wedding day” or “graduation day” are two [duplicate]

A birthday is the day of your birth, much like graduation day and wedding day. Why is birthday one word?
2
votes
2answers
584 views

Are words like “otherwise” and “maybe” considered compound words?

I typically think of words like "bittersweet" or "sandstorm" when I think of compound words. But words like "otherwise" or "maybe" also have two other complete words inside of them; are they also ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Use of hyphens when writing repeated compound words that have common parts

In my native language, Norwegian, one uses hyphens when stating two or more copulated compound words that has common parts (words). In a thesis I'm working on, should I write test specimens, test ...