Questions about words that are created by combining two or more other words together.

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0
votes
1answer
41 views

OK to use “capstone” as an adjective?

The term "capstone project" is common. Google tells me there's also something called "Capstone Classroom." The dictionary -- whatever dictionary you might look in -- says "capstone" is only ever a ...
6
votes
2answers
42 views

what is the technical word for a “de-compounded” phrase

I am curious as to what the technical term for "de-compounding" a word is. For example, if I were to change the word "bookstore," and change it into the phrase, "store of books," what would that ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

Words containing 2 overlapping standalone words [closed]

I'm looking for words that contain at least two other overlapping words. Word category or origin do not matter (in particular, constituent and containing terms may differ in these regards). Of course, ...
1
vote
1answer
49 views

What's the difference between 'single-hand' and 'single-handed'?

What's the difference between 'single-hand' and 'single-handed'? And why? Is meaning of 'single-hand' a subset of 'single-handed'?
1
vote
1answer
49 views

Why does pluralization of compound words typically occur in the middle as opposed to the end of the word?

As I understand, correct plural versions of passerby and attorney general become passersby and attorneys general. But why? With passerby, the the preposition "by" has been combined with the noun ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

codebase or code base?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Codebase Which is the more canonized version? canonized, not cannonized (although I'm certainly interested in anything that has been cannonized!)
3
votes
2answers
2k views

One word for “a one-eyed person”

I've given an English children's story to a small group of Italian kids to read and perform. The story is about a boy who changes into a cat and makes friends with a one-eyed next-door neighbour; a ...
2
votes
3answers
103 views

Is “Thrashing Win” an oxymoron?

According to me, a "crushing defeat" and a "thrashing win" are opposites. I have always seen the usage of these two terms in sports. But I have seldom seen the usage of "thrashing defeat". Is ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

Nonabelian or non-abelian?

I asked this question on Mathematics Stack Exchange (here) but I haven't had any luck so far. Allow me to copy the question: If I wanted to be scrupulous about correct spelling, is there any reason ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

relative clause with compound antecedent

I wonder what is the general way to create a relative clause modifying a compound antecedent? For example: This data is from many proof of concept environments and production environments that ...
1
vote
2answers
70 views

Possessive form (of) with compound nouns

This is a main difference between the personality of good people and bad people. Is the sentence comparing personality of good people and personality of bad people? or comparing personality of ...
0
votes
1answer
487 views

Compounds and Phrases - differences

What are differences of compounds and phrases and what do they have in common? I know there is the "nuclear stress rule" (phrasal stress on the last word of phrase) and the "compound stress rule" ...
0
votes
2answers
85 views

What is the correct hyphenation of “human skin tissue emulating gel”?

A type of gel designed to emulate human skin tissue. So, is this a "human skin tissue–emulating gel" (en dash)? Or, is it a "human-skin-tissue-emulating gel" (all hyphens)? Does anyone know the ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

How would you indicate a single direction trip?

This question came up today in the office. We sell single direction bus trips through our site (wanderu.com) but have not agreed on which English word(s) should be used in text. Is it one-way or one ...
2
votes
3answers
95 views

Compounds and Phrases

What is the difference between compounds and phrases? How do I know that "watch-maker" is a compound but "steel bridge" is a phrase? Does the "head" have anything to do with it (complement-head or ...
0
votes
0answers
212 views

Creating Old English compound words for placenames, surnames and weapons

I'm interested in automatically generating (mostly) Old English compound words, for use within a medieval fantasy video game. I have three categories below: Place-names: (using this) Riven-dale ...
0
votes
1answer
117 views

Use and meaning of o between words in blends

First things first: I'm italian, so please apologize me for my poor english. While trying to create a name for a thing, I got curious by the question in the title. Many English words (new and old ...
1
vote
2answers
197 views

Sugarcane or Sugar cane? [duplicate]

Is there a difference between "sugar cane" and sugarcane? Is sugarcane wrong? What is the gramatical rule for joining two names like that? I have found 13.500 entries on google for sugarcane, but ...
3
votes
2answers
181 views

What should words be called that can be separated into two or more parts, each of which means the same as the word as a whole?

What should words be called that can be separated into two or more parts, each of which means the same as the word as a whole? I know there are at least three words in English that fit this ...
2
votes
1answer
63 views

Should I use the “correct” form or the form used in the specification

I'm writing about a web framework. Integral part of it is its lifecycle. Apparently (as for example my browser tells me), this is not the correct spelling. I should either use life cycle or ...
-2
votes
2answers
342 views

Is there another word for a “large family” or “small family”?

I'm searching for another, perhaps more technical term for a large and a small family. To clarify, I simply mean a family with many children and one with very few, if any, children. So I'm not ...
1
vote
5answers
1k views

What word to choose as the opposite of “self-aware”?

What word would describe the quality of not being self-aware? unselfaware unself-aware un-selfaware un-self-aware non-self-aware I am aware that it is allowed to have multiple hyphens in a word. ...
2
votes
1answer
107 views

“a while” vs “awhile”

Is there a difference between "awhile" and "a while"? If there is, what is it? I've been wondering this for awhile, but now I actually need the answer.
5
votes
5answers
174 views

Is “missing person” considered a compound noun?

In the phrase missing person, is the whole phrase a compound noun or would missing be considered an adjective that modifies person? It seems like in many situations when it is used with other ...
0
votes
3answers
65 views

“A nounfull” of something

When I want to describe the amount of water one can hold in a cup, I might describe it as a "cupfull of water." Is is grammatically valid to extend this to other kinds of containers, like for example ...
1
vote
1answer
90 views

“Stockmarkets” vs. “stock markets”

I am having trouble with the difference between stockmarkets and stock markets — or should it be stock-markets? In some articles it is introduced as stockmarkets, but that term is not found in ...
1
vote
4answers
290 views

Decomposing “fingerprint”

I somehow ended up in a small argument about the first part of the compound word "fingerprint". The other person insists that the first word "finger" is an adjective, which I cannot agree with. ...
0
votes
2answers
102 views

“Web design” vs. “webdesign”

Suppose I want to use the word in a company's name, for example: ABC Web Design ABC Webdesign Which one is correct? Should it be one word or two?
2
votes
3answers
62 views

How to resolve the ambiguity of “two day classes”

Two day classes will take place this week. Here, "day classes" is a compound. I don't want it to sound like it's just one class that goes on for two days.
0
votes
3answers
93 views

How to handle ambiguity caused by long clause and compound?

I am composing a sentence: People who have children who score A's in school and have good health are very happy. In this sentence, 'have good health' is intended to be a clause of 'people'; ...
3
votes
4answers
351 views

Which form should be used for an “adjective noun”: singular, plural, possessive?

When should a noun acting as an adjective be plural, and when should it be singular? And when should it be possessive, like baker's dozen and when should it be plural possessive, like farmers' market? ...
0
votes
1answer
106 views

Compound words limitation

To what extent compound words are appropriate in English? Are the "onthedownburninghouseresting", "firesurrounded" valid words in English? Somehow I feel that the first one is not, while the second ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Are nouns like 'Create' appropriate in a compound? [closed]

I'm solving a problem where I must choose between 'CreateMethod' and 'CreationMethod'. The first one fits me better because I want to indicate an action, not the process invoked by that action. I'm ...
0
votes
1answer
147 views

What is the correct way to use hyphens when saying “eight to ten week cycle”? [duplicate]

A friend has asked about this and so far most seem to believe the best answer is: At the end of an eight- to ten-week project period, the team reports their findings and recommendations to their ...
4
votes
3answers
172 views

What is the combining form of 'Christian?'

I recently heard the term 'Judeo-Christian' which caused a thought to strike me. I don't know how to switch the order of the classical compound (word). What is the combining form of 'Christian?' ...
2
votes
1answer
743 views

Is it correct to say “Yesterday night”? [duplicate]

I have heard a lot of people say "Yesterday night" is that considered correct? I have always said last night.
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Should the names of different sorting algorithms be “<qualifier> sort” or “<qualifier>sort”?

Should the names of different sorting algorithms be <qualifier> sort or <qualifier>sort? The titles of Wikipedia articles of these sorting algorithms are not consistent with respect to ...
-1
votes
1answer
3k views

What’s the correct hyphenation in “trying to be a decision maker”?

Which of these three ways of writing it is right: decision maker (a space separates the two pieces) decision-maker (a hyphen separates the two pieces) decisionmaker (nothing separates the two ...
0
votes
2answers
143 views

Does one capitalize “Portuguese” when used in a hyphenated adjective? [closed]

When Portuguese is used as part of a hyphenated adjective, does it take an initial capital letter? Just checking on this while proofreading an article. Examples: portuguese-speaking college ...
10
votes
3answers
413 views

What part-of-speech would a vehicle's year/make/model be?

Suppose I were to say this sentence: "I own a 2003 Ford F-150." Would 2003 Ford F-150 be a compound proper noun? Would Ford F-150 be a compound proper noun and 2003 be an adjective? Would F-150 be ...
0
votes
1answer
141 views

On the Making of Decisions—Compound, Hyphen, or Space? [duplicate]

I'm responsible for most of the copy editing at my job. While it goes pretty smoothly most of the time, there is one area that keeps creating a bit of cognitive dissonance for me: decisionmaking ...
7
votes
4answers
17k views

Do I keep myself “up-to-date” or “up to date” on something?

Question is quite straightforward. I want to say that "I keep myself up-to-date on the latest technology". Or is it better "I keep myself up to date with the latest technology"? Thanks
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Young Surveyors Network or Young Surveyor Network? [duplicate]

I'm a surveyor and we are currently setting up our network. However, there seems to be a disagreement on the proper name of the group. The group is composed of young surveyors under the age of 35, ...
1
vote
2answers
155 views

Compound adverb — “kick-start a party soccer style”

I have asked this question in ELL site, but there were not much reply, and so I decided to ask the same question here. Though I will change the question a little bit to exactly what I need more and to ...
6
votes
1answer
9k views

Plural of feedback

I'm looking for a way to identify a specific amount of feedback items I'm visualizing in a list. The construction of the sentence needs to be generic, so I can't use something like Feedback received ...
17
votes
12answers
2k views

An Exocentric compound for Children

I have written a story for children in Persian. Somewhere in the story, I have mentioned "pear". "Pear" In Farsi is gool-abbi, which translates literally as "blue flower". I have mentioned that as ...
-1
votes
1answer
2k views

nominal compound/compound adjective

"The Duchess is a free(-)natured woman." In the above sentence is there a nominal compound? Can we write "a free-natured woman" using a hyphen? Are nominal compound and compound adjectives the ...
5
votes
1answer
446 views

How to hyphenate a negated compound noun?

We have a term for a process, "defect source assessment". We want to describe a set of processes that are not related to that process. Which of the following (if any) would be correct? non ...
0
votes
1answer
638 views

Should “two-week” be hyphenated in “a two-week all-expense-paid trip”? [duplicate]

Which is correct — "a two-week all-expense-paid trip" or "a two week all-expense-paid trip"?
3
votes
4answers
6k views

Can “nighttime” be used instead of “night-time”?

I forgot where but I saw the word "night-time" written like "nighttime". Now is that correct or accepted? Can it be written as a single word? I am specifically concerned about British usage. I did ...