Questions about words that are created by combining two or more other words together.

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1answer
29 views

Should the names of different sorting algorithms be “<qualifier> sort” or “<qualifier>sort”?

Should the names of different sorting algorithms be <qualifier> sort or <qualifier>sort? The titles of Wikipedia articles of these sorting algorithms are not consistent with respect to ...
-1
votes
1answer
38 views

What’s the correct hyphenation in “trying to be a decision maker”?

Which of these three ways of writing it is right: decision maker (a space separates the two pieces) decision-maker (a hyphen separates the two pieces) decisionmaker (nothing separates the two ...
0
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2answers
69 views

Does one capitalize “Portuguese” when used in a hyphenated adjective? [closed]

When Portuguese is used as part of a hyphenated adjective, does it take an initial capital letter? Just checking on this while proofreading an article. Examples: portuguese-speaking college ...
10
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3answers
196 views

What part-of-speech would a vehicle's year/make/model be?

Suppose I were to say this sentence: "I own a 2003 Ford F-150." Would 2003 Ford F-150 be a compound proper noun? Would Ford F-150 be a compound proper noun and 2003 be an adjective? Would F-150 be ...
0
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1answer
34 views

On the Making of Decisions—Compound, Hyphen, or Space? [duplicate]

I'm responsible for most of the copy editing at my job. While it goes pretty smoothly most of the time, there is one area that keeps creating a bit of cognitive dissonance for me: decisionmaking ...
1
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4answers
91 views

Do I keep myself “up-to-date” or “up to date” on something?

Question is quite straightforward. I want to say that "I keep myself up-to-date on the latest technology". Or is it better "I keep myself up to date with the latest technology"? Thanks
0
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1answer
33 views

Young Surveyors Network or Young Surveyor Network? [duplicate]

I'm a surveyor and we are currently setting up our network. However, there seems to be a disagreement on the proper name of the group. The group is composed of young surveyors under the age of 35, ...
1
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2answers
69 views

Compound adverb — “kick-start a party soccer style”

I have asked this question in ELL site, but there were not much reply, and so I decided to ask the same question here. Though I will change the question a little bit to exactly what I need more and to ...
4
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1answer
868 views

Plural of feedback

I'm looking for a way to identify a specific amount of feedback items I'm visualizing in a list. The construction of the sentence needs to be generic, so I can't use something like Feedback received ...
18
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12answers
1k views

An Exocentric compound for Children

I have written a story for children in Persian. Somewhere in the story, I have mentioned "pear". "Pear" In Farsi is gool-abbi, which translates literally as "blue flower". I have mentioned that as ...
-1
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1answer
158 views

nominal compound/compound adjective

"The Duchess is a free(-)natured woman." In the above sentence is there a nominal compound? Can we write "a free-natured woman" using a hyphen? Are nominal compound and compound adjectives the ...
5
votes
1answer
386 views

How to hyphenate a negated compound noun?

We have a term for a process, "defect source assessment". We want to describe a set of processes that are not related to that process. Which of the following (if any) would be correct? non ...
0
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1answer
44 views

Should “two-week” be hyphenated in “a two-week all-expense-paid trip”? [duplicate]

Which is correct — "a two-week all-expense-paid trip" or "a two week all-expense-paid trip"?
2
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4answers
837 views

Can “nighttime” be used instead of “night-time”?

I forgot where but I saw the word "night-time" written like "nighttime". Now is that correct or accepted? Can it be written as a single word? I am specifically concerned about British usage. I did ...
1
vote
2answers
64 views

Is aquamarine considered to be a compound word?

We've been debating whether or not aquamarine is a compound word or not. To me, I view "aqua" as being just a prefix rather than a standalone word, so I don't think aquamarine would be considered to ...
0
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1answer
109 views

“high-reliable”, “highly reliable”, or something else?

There was a discussion with my colleagues about a paper that I am currently writing and in which I use phrases like "a high-reliable system architecture". Some of my colleagues hold the view that this ...
1
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3answers
172 views

Does “the motor speed” mean the speed of the motor? [closed]

I'm an engineer and I often hear others say "the motor speed" when they are talking about the speed of the motor. For example, one might ask "What was the motor speed?" when he or she wants to know ...
1
vote
1answer
109 views

Why do we say a “hotel room” and not a “hotel's room”? [closed]

I would like to know what the rule is to explain why we do not use the genitive construction hotel's room. Instead, we say "a hotel room". Other examples: a hospital bed a bike stand Would ...
2
votes
1answer
331 views

“High-schooler” vs. “high schooler”

My initial attempt to settle the question with a google search didn't help as much as I'd hoped: A search for 'high schooler' revealed approximately 4% of results employing the hyphenated form. A ...
2
votes
2answers
101 views

The suffix -hood

I am using the suffix -hood as both base and suffix to derive poetical meaning in an interplay of the words "...child and adult hood." Though this may offend the ear of the modern day reader, I ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Land cover, land-cover, or landcover?

In literature, I often see landcover, land cover, and even land-cover. Land cover seems slightly more prevalent than the others. Which is correct? Land cover is the material covering the Earth's ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Is it possible to use a hyphen in a listing (in a sentence) for abbreviation, even if the compound word consists of two separate words [duplicate]

I'm currently asking myself if it is possible to use "-" for abbreviation in a listing in a sentence to emphasize the togetherness of the previous words and the word in the end, even if they are two ...
1
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1answer
49 views

Question on “Out of”

In "out of", is the "out" considered a preposition or an adverb?
1
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1answer
164 views

Hyphenation of a phrasal attributive with an open compound: “A B to C noun”

I'm wondering how to properly hyphenate (or en-dash) the following phrase: fiber optic to BNC converter That is to say, a device that converts "fiber optic" to BNC. If it didn't contain an open ...
7
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4answers
618 views

Why is “rollback it” incorrect?

I recently wrote the following sentence: Please roll it back. But if I were to describe the action on its own I would say: This rollback was due to objections by the original author. If I ...
0
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3answers
128 views

Why is endpoint a word while startpoint is not?

My text editor complains when I type 'startpoint' and does not complain when I type 'endpoint'. Why does this difference exist and what should I use for each?
1
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1answer
94 views

“All X-related things” / “All things X-related” / “All things X related”?

My French origins (probably?) would have me intuitively write “all X-related things”, but it seems usage favours the construct “all things X-related”, or even without a hyphen: “all things X related” ...
7
votes
4answers
623 views

Compound Adjectives and -ed

A colleague asked me this question, and I couldn't come up with an answer that satisfied him, so I'm wondering if anyone can help: Why does a man with a short temper become a short-tempered man? In ...
12
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3answers
300 views

Term for words like Snowmageddon, Nipplegate and even cheeseburger?

Is there a term for words like Snowmageddon, Nipplegate and even cheeseburger? I know they're portmanteaus (or portmanteaux), but they seem to belong to a special class of portmanteau. In the title ...
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votes
1answer
75 views

How can “[blank] of [blank]” be condensed into one word? [closed]

Maybe I am not asking this the right way. For example, could "illusion of pain" be condensed into one word or by simply using fewer words? This is not to be "pain-illusion." That is too different. ...
3
votes
0answers
68 views

Why is “birthday” one word as opposed to two? “Wedding day” or “graduation day” are two [duplicate]

A birthday is the day of your birth, much like graduation day and wedding day. Why is birthday one word?
2
votes
2answers
537 views

Are words like “otherwise” and “maybe” considered compound words?

I typically think of words like "bittersweet" or "sandstorm" when I think of compound words. But words like "otherwise" or "maybe" also have two other complete words inside of them; are they also ...
1
vote
1answer
173 views

Plural of composite noun?

I'm trying to say that each message can take some time to arrive (a delay), and that each such delay can have any value. So, which one of the following is the most appropriate? There is no bound ...
3
votes
2answers
143 views

How to form a word to represent “drawing quote ideas”?

I'm a graphic designer. I have a project at hand in which I want to draw the underlying concepts in famous quotes. I want to name this project, and I thought of something similar to "quote-drawing". ...
0
votes
1answer
131 views

use of hyphen to apply an adjective to non-hyphenated compound word

Do I write "non-power of two" or "non-power-of-two", where I assume "power of two" is a non-hyphenated compound word. I hope you can help! Thanks in advance. Ronny
0
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0answers
11 views

Hyphens in enumerations of compound words [duplicate]

do I write "and, or and not operator" or "and-, or- and not-operator". Similarly is "reading and writing phase" or "reading- and writing-phase" correct and why? (Sadly, I was unable to find an ...
2
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3answers
408 views

Noun phrase converted to verb, is a hyphen needed?

When "air kiss" is treated as a verb, as in "they air kissed", should it be hyphenated to "air-kissed"?
1
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3answers
171 views

What type of word is “abnomaly”?

I've got a coworker that frequently uses the word, "abnomaly", not "abnormal" and not "anomaly", but "abnomaly". While the types of these words differ (i.e. adjective versus noun), the meanings are ...
2
votes
2answers
210 views

Correct names for lycanthrope species with abnormally named base creatures

It's normally easy to name a lycanthrope species: just place "were" in front of the name of the base creature, i.e. "werewolf", "werebear", or "weredragon". Sometimes, though, the base creature's ...
0
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1answer
58 views

“Winner team” vs. “winning team”

I would like to know which of the following fragments is correct when referring to somebody who is part of the team that won a championship: Member of the winning team of... Member of the ...
0
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2answers
488 views

The use of hyphen in consecutive compounds [duplicate]

I am not that punctuation-savy, so I have one question for my research title. Currently it is Social crowdfunding: individual- and project-related determinants of success. Empirical ...
1
vote
3answers
333 views

“Out-of-this-world experiences” vs. “out of this world experiences”

I was wondering if the hyphenated version should be used? The context is: Introducing the World Cup box from McDonald's: the meal filled with out of this world experiences.
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votes
1answer
64 views

“Drive” in compounds [closed]

Sex drive means you want sex. Does blood drive mean you want to kill people? Does talk drive mean you (want to) talk a lot? I know it might not be something people say a lot if at all, but does it ...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

Is the term “ice cream” considered one word or two?

My question is a little broader than the title and applies to a term which is described by more than one "word". Is the term (in this case "ice cream") one word, or two? Based on my research, the ...
3
votes
2answers
236 views

Whatever happened to “eyeglasses”, “facial tissues”, and “video game consoles”?

Now-a-days, we tend to ask:"Have you seen my glasses anywhere?" "Do you have any spare tissues to lend me?" and "How many consoles do you own?" It's just quicker to say and any native speaker will ...
0
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3answers
214 views

“Cheeseslicer” or “cheese slicer”?

Can somebody confirm if the correct spelling is cheeseslicer or cheese slicer? I always thought in English words are not written together when combined, but some online dictionaries are contradictory ...
10
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5answers
1k views

In English you have 'above', 'on', 'over' and 'on top of' but in Italian one word, 'sopra', covers all four meanings

In Italian if I were to say, "sopra l'albero" (albero = tree) you might rightly ask: "Yes but where, exactly?" But "sopra" is a great word to learn in Italian, not only is it a very flexible ...
3
votes
2answers
251 views

What's the logic behind adjectives constructed with a hyphen?

I'll give you a lovecraftian stanza: Thro’ the ghoul-guarded gateways of slumber, Past the wan-moon’d abysses of night, I have liv’d o’er my lives without number, I have sounded all things ...
1
vote
3answers
262 views

They cheerleaded for it? or cheerled?

Is this the best way to conjugate "cheerlead"? they cheerleaded for it just the same "Cheerlead" becomes unrecognizable when you say "they cheerled", so I'm guessing this is why you don't ...
4
votes
3answers
130 views

Multiple hyphens make this phrase feel unwieldy… but are they right?

I'm writing a paper in which I refer to "natural-language-controlled robots" about thirty times. I'm curious about this phrase's hyphenation. I would write robots controlled by natural language ...