Questions about words that are created by combining two or more other words together.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

-3
votes
0answers
43 views

Can Batman be considered as a compound noun since it is a proper noun? [closed]

Since Batman is a proper noun can it be compound too? I am not sure if it could be both.
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Why does “face” turn to “faced” when used as a compound adjective? [closed]

I ask this question out of curiosity more than anything. We use the word "face" as a noun, but when it is used in a compound adjective, it turns into "faced": The features of his face hardened. ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Combining forms of country names

For the names of various countries, we have combining forms, e.g.: England -> Anglo- France -> Franco- Russia -> Russo- China -> Sino- India -> Indo- These seem to be used in two major contexts: ...
1
vote
2answers
36 views

Difference among Show as, Show with, and Show by

Is there any differences among theses sentences? Which one is better? We show the quantity with n. We show the quantity as n. We show the quantity by n.
0
votes
0answers
21 views

When do you link composite words with dashes? (compounds)

In German (my mother tongue) it is very common to combine several nouns into a new word by linking them together with dashes. After a word has been established in German, you even see it getting ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

Hyphenation of words like ‘waterproof’

The Oxford dictionary states that most compound adjectives made from a noun and an adjective should be hyphenated (e.g. ‘accident-prone’, ‘camera-ready’). On the other hand, its entry for the word ‘...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Creating Compound Words

I want to know if it's correct to write "a document that is considered relevant (not necessarily relevant in reality)" with a compound word like "relevant-considered document" or "considered-relevant ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

What does the word 'candle-skin' mean?

In the book Cider with Rosie, an autobiographical coming-of-age novel written by British author Laurie Lee and published in 1959, I find the word 'candle-skin', which I tried to look up in many online ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Hyphenation with numbers [closed]

I know that a compound adjective preceding a noun would require hyphenation in most circumstances; however, this particular phrasing has me doubting myself and I'd just like some clarification, if ...
0
votes
0answers
98 views

Using -rich suffix

I have to following example phrase: A movie, rich with effects Now I'd like transform it using the "-rich" suffix: Effect-rich movie At first, does such phrase sound natural? If no, is ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Compounds in works of fiction [closed]

I'm a non-native speaker. Recently, I read Child Of God by Cormac McCarthy. McCarthy seems to have a habit of making up "new words" when it suits him. E.g. The pipe crashed into the room in a ...
1
vote
1answer
95 views

What's the difference between “non alcohol” and “alcohol free”?

I saw a few groups on the web. A group's name is "Non alcohol ~" and another one is "Alcohol free ~". But I don't know the difference between "non alcohol" and "alcohol free". I think that "non ...
3
votes
1answer
50 views

How to spell “day hike” when it is used as a verb?

The compound noun "day hike" is used to describe "a hike that can be completed in a single day". It is most frequently written with a space in between the words, though you can find examples online ...
3
votes
1answer
60 views

Stress placement in compounds such as “elsewhere” and “inland”

In watching nature documentaries narrated by David Attenborough, I've noticed that in various compounds where Americans use first-syllable stress (elsewhere, inland, life-forms), he uses second-...
39
votes
9answers
4k views

I sightsaw London. Is this correct?

I want to ask if the following phrase is correct: I sightsaw London/the museum.
1
vote
1answer
199 views

Blogpost vs. blog post [duplicate]

Have I written a blogpost or a blog post? I've seen both forms used but am not sure which is the "correct" one, if there's any.
3
votes
3answers
190 views

13 Month Old or 13-Month-Old? [duplicate]

I have just installed Grammarly and it showed up something which i am not sure of. It corrected '13 month old' to '13-month-old'. The context is I ask because my 13-month-old God daughter ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

How can one decide whether to use the compound form of a word when the one- or two-word versions are acceptable? [duplicate]

This question is an attempt to find an abstract answer to every "one word or two?" discussion. My problem is exemplified by this scenario: My text editor's spellchecker recently corrected me on my ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

usage of separable and inseparable words [duplicate]

Words like wheelbarrow and nailbrush are used mingled, the wheel goes with barrow in inseparable form. On the other hand, words like tank top and high heels as it sounds ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

Word meaning “of a single word”, or, “word” as an adjective

I am trying to find a term to describe something as being comprised of a single word, similar to how the term monosyllabic describes something as being of a single syllable. Does such a term exist? Or ...
1
vote
1answer
34 views

Is it correct to say peg location instead of peg's location? [closed]

So I was reading "Solitaire" rules and a few times it was written "peg location", isn't it correct to say "peg's location"? Also why do people say "game score" instead of "game's score"
1
vote
2answers
91 views

Can the period be dropped in “vs” when used as part of a compound modifier?

I'm editing a passage. I'm not bound by a style guide. I think that I could omit the period after vs and not break any punctuation rules. The boss said that the hyphens are required because the names ...
1
vote
1answer
62 views

Listing multiple compound words

How do I list multiple things that are compound words? In my own language I'm used to writing these lists like this: "I kicked foot-, basket-, and volleyball" The sentence is supposed to mean that ...
16
votes
4answers
2k views

Why is “forward slash” not spelled “forwardslash”?

The phrase "forward slash" contains a space, while its equivalent "backslash" does not. This seems inconsistent; should "forwardslash" not be a valid word? From Wikipedia I discovered that slash, ...
2
votes
3answers
143 views

How should a multiple-word noun be punctuated within a compound adjective?

I would like to use a noun made of multiple words (like particle board, Mount Everest, or windscreen wiper) in a compound adjective with a hyphen. But I don't know how to hyphenate such a composition....
3
votes
3answers
150 views

Open non-compositional compound nouns

Closely related to my other question, I am searching for an open/spaced compound noun for which the following properties hold: Its constituents have a well-known association. Such as "honey" and ...
6
votes
9answers
648 views

Compound noun with completely different meaning

I am looking for a compound noun that has a meaning that is completely (or very) different from the words it is derived from. This because I want to give an example of how powerful the human brain is ...
0
votes
0answers
256 views

Working-level knowledge

What does "working-level knowledge" mean? I'm guessing it means that you're not an expert in something but you have sufficient knowledge of the subject to "get by". Context, from Stephane Chazelas ...
3
votes
1answer
165 views

touchscreen, touch-screen, touch screen? Merriam-Webster and Oxford disagree

I have searched but cannot find a definite answer on the correct to write "touch screen". Merriam-Webster says touch screen. Oxford says touchscreen. And random people around the internet say "touch-...
1
vote
3answers
376 views

Nonsmoking or Non-smoking

Would one write that someone is “a nonsmoking so-and-so” or “a non-smoking so-and-so”? I'm not sure if the hyphen is necessary or superfluous.
0
votes
0answers
133 views

What is the correct way to write the word “back-end”? [duplicate]

Back-end and front-end are common technical terms nowadays. Traditionally, they are written with a hyphen "back-end". Is there a rule in the English language that dictates this to be a correct way to ...
0
votes
2answers
288 views

What does “The computer programmer says the glass is full-empty” mean?

There is a famous expression: The glass is half empty or half full, depending on whether you are a pessimist or optimist. There is a twist on this theme for computer programmers The computer ...
0
votes
2answers
73 views

Can I create adjectives with -type suffix?

In a document, I define two different types of memory accesses (but it could be anything else): We distinguish between two types of memory accesses: mem1 accesses and mem2 accesses because they ...
1
vote
3answers
890 views

Timestep, time step, time-step: Which variant to use?

I am writing a piece on integration of differential equations. One of the words that I have to use frequently is "timestep" (however it is written), i.e. a step forward in the "simulated" time. There ...
2
votes
2answers
143 views

Slashes for hyphens in compound modifiers

Take the phrase "a joint FBI-SFPD task force" for example. According to my boss, a slash can stand in for the hyphen. I tend to disagree. Is this grammatically correct? Stylistically acceptable?
3
votes
3answers
238 views

Plural of “coming out?”

As "coming out of the closet" has become ubiquitous in recent years, what would the plural be? Would it follow the rule of "goings-on" or be a hyphenated "coming-outs" or something else entirely?
0
votes
1answer
158 views

Intermediate level student or intermediate-level student?

Intermediate level student or intermediate-level student? Which one is more correct/preferable?
1
vote
1answer
100 views

Which word is most correct in this case: re-settle or resettle?

In reference to the word settle as it pertains to the specific definition: Determine; decide on: There is some debate internally on whether to use the word resettle which only has one definition:...
0
votes
1answer
106 views

OK to use “capstone” as an adjective?

The term "capstone project" is common. Google tells me there's also something called "Capstone Classroom." The dictionary -- whatever dictionary you might look in -- says "capstone" is only ever a ...
6
votes
2answers
64 views

what is the technical word for a “de-compounded” phrase

I am curious as to what the technical term for "de-compounding" a word is. For example, if I were to change the word "bookstore," and change it into the phrase, "store of books," what would that "...
0
votes
1answer
116 views

Words containing 2 overlapping standalone words [closed]

I'm looking for words that contain at least two other overlapping words. Word category or origin do not matter (in particular, constituent and containing terms may differ in these regards). Of course, ...
1
vote
1answer
271 views

What's the difference between 'single-hand' and 'single-handed'?

What's the difference between 'single-hand' and 'single-handed'? And why? Is meaning of 'single-hand' a subset of 'single-handed'?
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Why does pluralization of compound words typically occur in the middle as opposed to the end of the word?

As I understand, correct plural versions of passerby and attorney general become passersby and attorneys general. But why? With passerby, the the preposition "by" has been combined with the noun "...
0
votes
1answer
415 views

codebase or code base?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Codebase Which is the more canonized version? canonized, not cannonized (although I'm certainly interested in anything that has been cannonized!)
3
votes
2answers
8k views

One word for “a one-eyed person”

I've given an English children's story to a small group of Italian kids to read and perform. The story is about a boy who changes into a cat and makes friends with a one-eyed next-door neighbour; a ...
2
votes
3answers
163 views

Is “Thrashing Win” an oxymoron?

According to me, a "crushing defeat" and a "thrashing win" are opposites. I have always seen the usage of these two terms in sports. But I have seldom seen the usage of "thrashing defeat". Is "...
1
vote
0answers
59 views

Nonabelian or non-abelian?

I asked this question on Mathematics Stack Exchange (here) but I haven't had any luck so far. Allow me to copy the question: If I wanted to be scrupulous about correct spelling, is there any reason ...
0
votes
1answer
84 views

relative clause with compound antecedent

I wonder what is the general way to create a relative clause modifying a compound antecedent? For example: This data is from many proof of concept environments and production environments that ...
1
vote
3answers
264 views

Possessive form (of) with compound nouns

This is a main difference between the personality of good people and bad people. Is the sentence comparing personality of good people and personality of bad people? or comparing personality of ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

Compounds and Phrases - differences

What are differences of compounds and phrases and what do they have in common? I know there is the "nuclear stress rule" (phrasal stress on the last word of phrase) and the "compound stress rule" (...