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3
votes
1answer
90 views

Complements and adjuncts

Paul Austen’s novel sold immediately to the author’s eager readers. In the above sentence, which part is the complement and which is the adjunct? I am confused as to whether the adjunct should be ...
2
votes
2answers
64 views

Are these interrogatives subjects or complements for verbs?

[a] Which is the best choice for the blank? [b] What's the best choice you have made? (TED) Which are the subjects in above respectively? It seems like which in [a] and what in [b] are ...
19
votes
1answer
2k views

He died [as?] a broken man

He died a broken man. One of my students came across this sentence in an article, and a quick search for "he died a * man" yields a plethora of similar ones. I'm fairly certain this sentence is ...
4
votes
1answer
278 views

Why do these verbs take bare infinitives?

[a] It makes the tree grow. [b] I never heard him speak. I’m wondering why causative and sense verbs (make, hear) license bare infinitives for their complement, instead of taking to infinitives? ...
1
vote
0answers
108 views

Is this a predicative adjunct?

At breakfast on Thursday she bored them all stupid with flying tips she'd gotten out of a library book called Quidditch Through the Ages. –– Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone As far as ...
1
vote
2answers
126 views

What does refering to someone as a “garden shed” mean? [closed]

http://youtu.be/a9GgU3hzGGw?t=1m54s In the following video, a talk host watches an acting performance, and refers to the actor as a "garden shed". I've never heard that expression before. I am also ...
2
votes
1answer
237 views

adverbs modifying noun phrases and licensing their own complements

[i] Harry looked down at his empty gold plate. He had only just realized how hungry he was. The pumpkin pasties seemed ages ago. (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) [ii] Albus Dumbledore ...
2
votes
1answer
88 views

Is this mixture of plural and singular legitimate?

But what is most important for our purposes is that these changes were the signal for the resumption of historical debate on a grand scale, of the kind that had been suspended or driven ...
5
votes
2answers
244 views

how to understand “as ~ as ever”

Nosey Flynn was sitting up in his usual corner of Davy Byrne's and, when he heard the story, he stood Farrington a half-one, saying it was as (1) smart a thing as (2) ever (3) he heard. (James ...
6
votes
2answers
351 views

Participial clause?

On ELL a user has asked how to parse the emphasized -ing form in this sentence from Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone: Harry swung at it with the bat to stop it from breaking his nose, and ...
2
votes
1answer
128 views

Is this that-clause a complement?

In that discomfort, breathing quicklime and tar, no one could see very well how from the bowels of the earth there was rising not only the largest house in the town, but the most hospitable and ...
-2
votes
1answer
225 views

What is the difference complementing with prepositional phrase and with to-infinitive? [closed]

To-infinitive complements must be distinguished from PP complement with the preposition to. The following quotation illustrates the difference. The global threat to our security was clear. ...
1
vote
2answers
364 views

Can object complements make any difference to sentences?

I'm reading a grammar book, and I have some questions. A. We ate the fish raw. I want Sue drunk. I prefer the music soft. I like coffee black. We drank the beer cold. This type of ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

notion of complement

Liam is very ill. (English Syntax and Argumentation, Bas Aarts) Traditional Grammar says ‘very ill’ as a subject complement. And the book says ‘very ill’ as a complement for verb be. Do I have ...
2
votes
3answers
906 views

Object complement adjective, or direct object, or?

Jill painted the kitchen rosey red. In this sentence, would red be considered an object complement adjective? If so, what do I do with rosey, since I cannot have an adjective modifying another ...
1
vote
1answer
264 views

Is the prepositional phrase possibly called a subject complement?

Russet leaves were swept by past winds in heaps. (Original sentence: "Russet leaves, swept by past winds in heaps."— Jane Eyre) ‘In heaps’ can be called as a ‘positional’ complement for ...
2
votes
2answers
573 views

Can adjectives make adjuncts modifying verbs?

Her teeth gleamed white against the tanned skin of her face. It seems ‘white’ is an adjunct modifying gleamed, while it’s not a complement for it’s not necessary to complete the meaning. But I’m ...
0
votes
1answer
178 views

complement vs adjunct [closed]

“Funny, isn’t it,” she said, “how the law can have a soft spot like that? No, someone had seen her in the village at the time Robin went missing, so she wasn’t really a suspect. It was decided ...
0
votes
1answer
381 views

Is 'that-clause' an adverbial clause or a complement clause?

"I’m glad that we’ve won the match." An English-Korean dictionary says that-clause above is an adverbial clause. However, from the definition for complement by Oxford - “one or more words, ...
1
vote
1answer
542 views

“Heard me [infinitive]” vs. “heard me [gerund]”

"Heard me [infinitive]" vs. "heard me [gerund]" At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talk about it. At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talking about it. At that time, ...
2
votes
1answer
233 views

Correct usage of infinitives

I am not sure about the usage of infinitives in this sentence: Finally, one of the accused confessed to have forged the director's signature on the report. Could anyone explain correct usage? ...
5
votes
5answers
603 views

Is this an objective complement or adjective phrase?

In ‘catch me off guard’, is the ‘off guard’ an objective complement or adjective phrase that modifies ‘me’? My Great Uncle Algie kept trying to catch me off guard and force some magic out of me ...
4
votes
4answers
155 views

Complement of digress?

Is there a verb that means "to return from a digression"? The best I can think of is a phrase like "Getting back on topic, . . ."
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Grammatical complements for “allow”

Are any of these verb phrases grammatical? allows the user of modeling and resolving allows the user to model and resolve Which version of the following sentence is correct/better? ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Recommend someone

I'd like to ask about the use of the verb "recommend" in the following sentences: We'd recommend you to book your flight early. The plumber recommended me to buy a new water heater. The ...
5
votes
3answers
123 views

Is there any difference between ‘it’ and ‘so’ as a complement of ‘she looks’?

D’you – d’you want to go to the ball with me?” said Harry. Why did he have to go red now? Why? ”Oh!” said Cho, and she went red too. “Oh Harry, I’m really sorry,” and she truly looked it. ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

What is an adjectival complement in English?

How can one determine what an adjectival complement is in an English sentence? Are there are any subcategories to this classification? I'd love concrete examples, to help me better understand this ...
3
votes
2answers
917 views

Complement or object?

I saw him cross the road. Is cross the road the object of saw? Or is it the complement of him?
9
votes
1answer
1k views

How do I determine subject and subject complement in “A side-effect is the spread of commercialese to other domains.”?

Consider this example: Commercialese is an instrument of art, designed to enrich and invigorate our language—surely you will all agree with this—, and we should encourage newcomers to learn ...