Questions about grammaticality of comparisons

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50
votes
12answers
16k views

I can run faster than _____. (1) him (2) he?

Consider the sentence "I can run faster than 15 miles per hour." Its meaning is clear and to my eyes obviously grammatically correct. Now let me present some variations that have given me trouble for ...
20
votes
2answers
57k views

“X times as many as” or “X times more than”

Suppose John has 5 sweets. Is there any difference between the following two sentences? Jack has 3 times as many sweets as John. Jack has 3 times more sweets than John. I prefer the first ...
3
votes
3answers
951 views

“Me” versus “I”

He was almost as bad at English as me. He was almost as bad at English as I. The first one sounds better as-is, but not when you change the second one to He was almost as bad at English as I was. ...
8
votes
3answers
443 views

“A similar hat to Jane” vs “A hat similar to Jane’s”

Of late I have noticed British people using the following sort of construct: John and Jane make such a cute couple because John always wears a similar hat to Jane. To my ear, that is ...
9
votes
6answers
46k views

Which is higher — “hyper-”, “ultra-” or “super-”?

According to OED, hyper-: over, beyond, over much, above measure ultra-: beyond super-: over, above, higher than They all have the meaning "higher than", but what is the order of ...
6
votes
1answer
31k views

“so long as” vs. “as long as”

I just googled the difference between as long as and so long as. The difference has alredy been discussed here. There are, it seems, two contexts for these expressions: lengths and physical ...
2
votes
3answers
749 views

When do you leave out the preposition in a relative clause?

A non-fiction titled "Do the Right Thing" published in 1998 has this sentence: (1) Am I treating this stranger with the same consideration that I would a friend? Another book (fiction) titled "...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

“I so much as look” doesn't make any sense to me

There is a conversation in Californication season 5, ep. 9 where Tyler talks to Charlie and Charlie says: - I'd love to Tyler, but they watch me like a hawk here - I so much as look at a ...
27
votes
18answers
6k views

Was I driving more than 5 mph under the speed limit, or less than 5 mph under the speed limit?

Suppose I am driving 38 miles per hour in a 45 zone. This, of course, is seven miles per hour under the speed limit. Of course, I am driving this slowly because the road is wet, and safe driving ...
7
votes
2answers
720 views

How to compare frequency of word use over time between British and American English?

Google Ngram viewer allows one to compare the frequencies of a set of phrases over time. It even allows you to restrict that comparison to an American corpus, or separately to an English one. What I ...
5
votes
3answers
32k views

“Prefer to” vs “prefer than”

I am confused as to when to use "prefer to" and "prefer than". For example, we write: I prefer coffee to tea. So why can't we use than instead of to? Also, can someone give me an example of ...
6
votes
2answers
5k views

What's the difference between nauseous and nauseated?

I read an article about the difference between nauseous and nauseated: It seems the article at last indicate that both nauseous and nauseated can mean the state of wanting to vomit. Is that true? ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

“as far as” vs. “so far as” vs. “in so far as”

Are these sentences the same? As far as I know, he's going to Chicago. So far as I know, he's going to Chicago. In so far as I know, he's going to Chicago. I think that they are the ...
1
vote
1answer
53 views

Is “'as' + article + adjective + noun + 'as'” grammatically correct?

The sentiments expressed in the tweets can be as accurate a measure as is found with traditional telephone surveys. The sentence above is grammatically correct. I wonder if it is still ok when I ...
9
votes
1answer
477 views

Scottish vs. scotch

I looked up the dictionary, and both gave me definitions that refer to a people from Scotland. Is there a difference between these two words?
6
votes
4answers
41k views

Which is correct: “So far as I know” or “As far as I know”?

Which is more appropriate: "So" or "As"?
4
votes
4answers
18k views

Difference between “affiliated” and “associated”

What is the difference between being affiliated and being associated with a group of people?
1
vote
3answers
64 views

The rhetorical effect of “no more … than” construction

The following is a part of the section 15.70 of A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language (Longman). Rachel is no more courageous than Saul(is). The sentence implies that both ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

“He is better than _____.” (1) I (2) I am?

Which of the following constructions is / are correct? He is better than I. He is better than I am. PS: I'm unfamiliar with this site and its workings, so forgive me if my question fails to follow ...
1
vote
1answer
261 views

Why is “not as … as” preferred to “not cheaper than”?

In the rephrasing exercise A is more expensive than B. > A is not _________ B. The only correct answer is supposed to be "A is not as cheap as B". However, a student suggested "A is not cheaper ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“Difference between” multiple choices (vs. “among”) [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “between” vs “among” I learned that "between" refers to two objects or concepts and "among" refers to three or more. However, in situations when I ...
-2
votes
0answers
197 views

Confusion regarding “I” and “me” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: I can run faster than _. (1) him (2) he? Which one is correct? He is taller than I. He is taller than me.