Questions about grammaticality of comparisons

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1answer
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Use of “that of” (e.g. “that of in”)

Sentence in question: The total amount of donation in 2010 has surpassed that of in 1990. Can you use "that of" as a tool to compare the difference in volume of a same thing in different years?
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3answers
38 views

Simile with a noun in the middle? [on hold]

He expected as good of a performance as Sam's. Or He expected as good as performance as Sam. (sounds very wrong to me) He expected as good of a performance as Sam.
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6answers
880 views

Can an adverb be a noun?

I have seen this post for the answer to my question, but this is not much help in case of the question I am going to ask. Here is an example sentence - The new design of Twitter profile is more ...
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0answers
53 views

Is this the correct usage? [closed]

I'm trying to translate a research paper regarding the history of translation in Iran. the original text is in Farsi so I have to translate it to English. So I have translated one paragraph in this ...
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2answers
75 views

What are the best words to describe subjects being compared?

I tried to Google this but no luck so far. I was wondering if there was proper words to describe the comparison of 2 subjects? The first subject would be the object being compared in relation to the ...
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1answer
79 views

'compare [something] with/to [something]' vs. 'compare'

Should I always compare something with/to something? In many texts you see structures like this one, from Maciej Paszynski, Fast Solvers for Mesh-Based Computations: After several steps, we end up ...
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0answers
43 views

Word order in a complex comparison sentence [closed]

I'm having trouble deciding which word order to use in the sentence I don't know how much better our system will be than others. Is this correct, or should the "than others" part be after "...
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1answer
56 views

Equivalent to “pairwise” for a triplet [closed]

Pairwise may describe the process of comparing entities in pairs. What is the word for the process of describing the comparison of entities in triplet?
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6answers
46k views

Which is higher — “hyper-”, “ultra-” or “super-”?

According to OED, hyper-: over, beyond, over much, above measure ultra-: beyond super-: over, above, higher than They all have the meaning "higher than", but what is the order of ...
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1answer
35 views

like that of + possessive noun [duplicate]

I came across this sentence: "His memory was like that of a baby." I was wondering why the possessive "baby's" wasn't used and why "baby" is acceptable whereas the possessive form is required in ...
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1answer
21 views

Use of dashes or commas when adding a qualifier

For the following, I'm not sure how to separate each component of the sentence: After the standard battery of tests, factual verifications (Who's the president? — Obama) and autobiographical ...
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1answer
40 views

Comparisons with the word “twice” — i.e. twice as expensive vs. twice more expensive

Why is it that it's okay to say "This dress is twice as expensive as this jacket" but not okay to say "This dress is twice more expensive than this jacket" ? Furthermore, it seems okay to me so say, ...
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2answers
306 views

Use of “unlike” while comparing two things, followed by a comma and “in something else”

I am wondering, which one is correct: Unlike in something, in something else it is easy to... Unlike something, in something else it is easy to... My instinct tells me both versions could ...
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2answers
32 views

Is there such phrase as “what more”?

In sentences that I want to emphasize the ability of a person to do a certain task at a greater degree than another person, will it make sense to use "what more"? If Canelo can do that to Khan, ...
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0answers
25 views

'as good asymptotically as' or 'asymptotically as good as'?

In terms of grammar, should I say 'The error bound of AA is as good asymptotically as that of BB' OR 'The error bound of AA is asymptotically as good as that of BB' ? Or both are correct?
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1answer
47 views

“In contrast with” or “In contrast to” (or something else)?

In my writing I often like to make a comparison between two things. However, I'm not sure how I should start my sentence and if it's even a good idea to start it this way. Example: React has a ...
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1answer
25 views

surpass he or his, possessive or pronoun

Mary and John were given the same task. In the end, Mary's work is better, and far exceeds his/him. Is "him" grammatically incorrect here?
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4answers
52 views

If we say A is weaker than B by a factor of x, then should x be smaller or bigger than 1?

In math, we always need to derive different algorithms to get a tighter error bound. It may be correct almost surely that: the error bound of B is better than that of A by a factor x (x is bigger than ...
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2answers
5k views

What's the difference between nauseous and nauseated?

I read an article about the difference between nauseous and nauseated: It seems the article at last indicate that both nauseous and nauseated can mean the state of wanting to vomit. Is that true? ...
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1answer
41 views

Comparing different (but related) qualities in English

I was recently trying to express a sentiment like the following. New York is bluer than South Carolina is red. (For those not familiar with U.S. political jargon, blue = Democratic and red = ...
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2answers
76 views

“I don't give a fig” degrees of comparison

It's absolutely OK to say something like "My liver pain bothers me more than my nose bleeding" right? But what about the opposite attitude. If I don't really care about something, can I compare it ...
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0answers
24 views

Should the usual way to construct a comparative sentence be singular or plural?

Let's say I want to compare two animals A rabbit runs faster than a turtle or Rabbits run faster than turtles. Which one should I prefer?
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1answer
48 views

…achieved, on average, mixed results at best…?

Does this phrase even make sense? To say that [a particular approach] "achieved, on average, mixed results at best". I'm concerned about the combination of 'on average', 'mixed results', and ...
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3answers
5k views

Is there a word that describes both “comparing” and “contrasting”?

I'm looking for a more succinct word/small phrase that conveys the idea of "comparing and contrasting". Is there a word that hits two birds with one stone by representing both similarities and ...
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2answers
310 views

Why does “He is as rich as any in our town” mean “He is one of the richest people in our town”?

According to my textbook, the sentence He is as rich as any in our town. has the same meaning as the following one: He is one of the richest people in our town. Is it right? It seems that ...
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3answers
56 views

What is compared in ''than I thought''?

Let's take a sample sentence: This game is funnier than I thought. We compare the game. The game is funny, but not as I thought first. We are trying to find what is compared to the game.
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2answers
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Are both comparisons correct?

I thought that the error was C because I thought the comparison should have been: Because sound waves travel faster in liquids than in gases, the speed of sound in water is greater than that of ...
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2answers
49 views

to be riddled with something vs to teem with something

I'd like to ask how verbs 'to be riddled with something' (idiom) and 'to teem with something' (phrasal verb) overlap each other and can we replace with one another in the same sentence? For example: ...
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5answers
100 views

Word choice for a comparison of different amounts

I'm currently struggling to clearly state the following situation: Background: Let's assume I have two newspaper articles A and B. Let's say I want to count how often a specific word (for instance ...
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2answers
54 views

Use of “as” with verbs? [closed]

Would you say: I don't know anybody who has as much energy as John. or I don't know anybody who has as much energy as John does.
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9answers
13k views

What is the difference between a scenario and situation?

Based on a survey done globally I have been tasked with writing a help guide to cover scenarios and situations - for a cloud app I created. But I don't understand what the difference is between a ...
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1answer
15k views

Is “I am more than happy to help you” grammatically correct?

Ok, I often hear my American teacher says "I am more than happy to help you". I am not sure it is grammatically correct. Ok, there is no problem to say "I am happy to help you" or "I am very happy ...
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1answer
36 views

How do I state the sameness of some number of objects?

How do you say something is identical and having a quantity greater than two using “(the) same”? Which is right among below? If there’s no right form, please let me know the right form to describe ...
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5answers
3k views

the idiomatic use of “no more than” and “no less than”

I have questions about the use of no more than and no less than . The following is the item 14. phrase of the word more from COBUILD online dictionary. You use no more than or not more than when ...
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3answers
64 views

The rhetorical effect of “no more … than” construction

The following is a part of the section 15.70 of A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language (Longman). Rachel is no more courageous than Saul(is). The sentence implies that both ...
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4answers
3k views

What is it called when comparing two opposite people or things

Can someone please let me know what is the technique called when I compare two people who are very different? In my case, it is Donald Woods when he first meets Steve Biko in the film Cry Freedom. I ...
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1answer
99 views

Which is the right sentence to compare multiple objects with different properties?

I'm writing a scientific paper in which there is a statement on the comparison of multiple objects with different properties. Actually, I would like to compare among A with P1, A with P2, B, and C. ...
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3answers
32k views

“Prefer to” vs “prefer than”

I am confused as to when to use "prefer to" and "prefer than". For example, we write: I prefer coffee to tea. So why can't we use than instead of to? Also, can someone give me an example of ...
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1answer
7k views

Comparisons: “so [adjective/adverb] as” or “as [adjective/adverb] as”

When learning how to make comparisons, students of English as a foreign language are first told to use the structure "as [adjective/adverb] as". However, at higher levels, they are told that both ...
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1answer
102 views

“Prefer … to” vs. “prefer … rather than”

Can we use "prefer" and "rather than" together? E.g., I prefer walking rather than driving.
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2answers
62 views

How to use the comparison--“Not like…but then” and what does “be less than peas in a pod” mean?

Tommen was a sweet boy. Not like his brother (Joffery), but then Jaime and Tyrion were some what less than peas in a pod themselves. This sentence is extracted from the Game of Thrones. I don't ...
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1answer
477 views

Scottish vs. scotch

I looked up the dictionary, and both gave me definitions that refer to a people from Scotland. Is there a difference between these two words?
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0answers
28 views

deletion of the verb after a non-fixed-expression 'as … as' comparison

I think my concern will be best illustrated by an example: "Minors do not have as many rights as adults" I have always found myself questioning whether I need to add a "do" after or before "...
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2answers
48 views

“large field of view” vs “high field of view”

Which one is right between "large field of view" and "high field of view"?
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1answer
188 views

How can you describe “percentage” in a sentence?

I need to compare two system and explain that one is faster than the other specifying the percentage, so is the following correct? in fact new system computes the whole dataset the 10% percent ...
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2answers
160 views

“The box of candies” or “The box of THE candies”

I understand that "Look on the table. Take the box of candies." is ok. But is this ok? "Take the box of the candies." If so, is there any difference?
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1answer
58 views

“What” vs “what kind of”

So, I've read that questions "what kind of" are about characteristics: "What kind of game is it? - It's an exciting game." But "What game is it? - It's Warcraft." Is it right? But what about "What ...
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2answers
84 views

SAT Grammar Question - Comparisons [closed]

I have a question on comparisons. I said no error first, and that was wrong. I don't see an error with B or D or A. Is it C "being"? Should it be switched to be?
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4answers
224 views

Can something be “blacker” than something else? How common are single-word comparatives and superlatives for color-designating adjectives?

Merriam-Webster implies that the comparative and superlative for black are blacker and blackest. However, my native British colleague says he would never used blacker, only more black. How common is ...