Questions about grammaticality of comparisons

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
1answer
65 views

Use of “and” and “or” to refer to values for comparison [closed]

I've gotten into a disagreement with a colleague. My original sentence was "Determine the maximum value of Boys and Girls." My colleague thought that the sentence should read "Determine the maximum ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

What's the difference between nauseous and nauseated?

I read an article about the difference between nauseous and nauseated: It seems the article at last indicate that both nauseous and nauseated can mean the state of wanting to vomit. Is that true? ...
2
votes
3answers
5k views

“Prefer to” vs “prefer than”

I am confused as to when to use "prefer to" and "prefer than". For example, we write: I prefer coffee to tea. So why can't we use than instead of to? Also, can someone give me an example of ...
1
vote
2answers
204 views

How to say two dates are the same?

I have a prompt that allows the user to input a date used to generate a report. The date is used to find records. date is on MM/DD/YY date is before MM/DD/YY date is after MM/DD/YY date is between ...
-2
votes
1answer
81 views

Is it natural to say “3 oranges and 4 apples are the same weight”?

When two groups of items have different masses, we can easily say "3 oranges are lighter than 4 apples." "3 oranges are heavier than 4 apples." How about when they have the same mass? Can we say "3 ...
5
votes
3answers
4k views

What is the difference between “wriggle room” and “wiggle room”?

The phrase "wriggle room" gives 2 million results on Google. "Wiggle room" gives 140 thousand, suggesting that both phrases are valid English. Google N-grams seems to back this theory up too. ...
0
votes
2answers
433 views

“Of which I am unaware of” & “I don't know”, semantic difference

While reading first few chapters of fascinating book "On Writing Well", this doubt struck my mind: "There are many great English writings of which I am unaware of" OR "There are many great ...
6
votes
8answers
13k views

What's the verdict on “sooner than later”?

I have heard a lot of people say at work that we should do something "sooner than later." This grates against my native ear, but it seems fairly commonplace. I have always understood the expression to ...
1
vote
4answers
120 views

Position of “than”

Which of the following sentence structures is correct, or sounds better? They grow at a faster rate up to three years after treatment than comparable plants. They grow at a faster rate than ...
1
vote
2answers
88 views

Is it correct to say: too homogeneous?

This is the context: "I missed the diversity of church, it felt rather like a French-only church, or an under-21’s church may feel like—too homogeneous." I want to use the word homogeneousitic, but I ...
0
votes
2answers
62 views

An expression similar to “frame of reference”

I am trying to explain a mathematical point that is used for comparison such that all values are compared to it, like a "frame of reference". I've also thought of "pivot of comparison". Are any of ...
-1
votes
1answer
192 views

meaning of comparison

(1) “You are mistaken in supposing me a beggar. I am no beggar; any more than yourself or your young ladies.”(Jane Eyre) (2) “No blame attached to me: I am as free from culpability as any ...
2
votes
2answers
159 views

“Can I do X” vs. “Can't I do X”

Consider this scenarios: A: Can I do X? A: Can't I do X? In both the cases, the B replies with "Yes" to indicate A can do X and with "No" to indicate he cannot. The 1st one seems to ask for ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

The cheaper the car, the easier to buy it

I have a technical sentence that is: The lower the mixing paramter, the more obvious the clustering structure and thus the easier to identify the correct clustering structure. My question is ...
-3
votes
3answers
342 views

What does “with all the discrimination of a shotgun” mean? [closed]

"If you scatter commas into a sentence with all the discrimination of a shotgun, you might make it to the foyer before we politely escort you from the building." Source: http://goo.gl/ZH6lO Doesn't a ...
1
vote
1answer
211 views

Why is “not as … as” preferred to “not cheaper than”?

In the rephrasing exercise A is more expensive than B. > A is not _________ B. The only correct answer is supposed to be "A is not as cheap as B". However, a student suggested "A is not cheaper ...
2
votes
1answer
13k views

“so long as” vs. “as long as”

I just googled the difference between as long as and so long as. The difference has alredy been discussed here. There are, it seems, two contexts for these expressions: lengths and physical ...
1
vote
1answer
972 views

“as .. as” vs. “as much … as”

Using the expression as (much) ... as, I want to express that the quality or degree of someone's beauty is about the same as that of her intelligence. I'd like to know if it is correct to say either: ...
0
votes
2answers
90 views

'Packing list' vs.'What's in the box'

Which one is more English when you describe a product to tell people what is included in the packing? And is there any difference between these two phrases?
3
votes
2answers
1k views

“as far as” vs. “so far as” vs. “in so far as”

Are these sentences the same? As far as I know, he's going to Chicago. So far as I know, he's going to Chicago. In so far as I know, he's going to Chicago. I think that they are the ...
3
votes
2answers
154 views

Listing of items in order of their effectiveness

In a research paper, how do I list things in order of their effectiveness? For example, The order of antagonistic effect of acetic acid against E. coli O157:H7 was salt > glycine > glucose > ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

What's the difference between “hundreds of thousands of” and “hundreds and thousands of”

What's the difference between "hundreds of thousands of" and "hundreds and thousands of"? Are they both correct?
8
votes
2answers
602 views

Why can we say “worth more than” but not “expensive more than”?

Why can we say: It is worth more than. . . . but not: It is expensive more than. . . . It’s the position of more which I find so confusing. Also, is worth an adjective in both these ...
-1
votes
0answers
41 views

Use of “me” vs. “I” in comparisons [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: I can run faster than _____. (1) him (2) he? I was using this sentence with an ease until my teacher scolded that this is wrong. He said to use I in place of me as ...
-1
votes
1answer
862 views

What is the meaning of “A is not as old as B”? [closed]

In my understanding, the following sentence A is not as old as B. may have 2 meanings, either A is older than B or A is newer than B . So what is the actual meaning of "A is ...
1
vote
2answers
141 views

Relic and relics [closed]

Reliquary is a receptacle, often made of precious metal and richly decorated, in which a religious relic or relics are kept, as a small box, casket, or shrine. In this sentence that I copied from ...
1
vote
3answers
7k views

What's the difference between perimeter and circumference? [closed]

What's the difference between perimeter and circumference when they mean the total length of the boundary of a two-dimensional geometric shape?
5
votes
5answers
20k views

Which is higher — “hyper-”, “ultra-” or “super-”? [closed]

According to OED, hyper-: over, beyond, over much, above measure ultra-: beyond super-: over, above, higher than They all have the meaning "higher than", but what is the order of ...
1
vote
3answers
3k views

What's the difference between direction and orientation?

I frequently see these two words in 3D programming. For example: the direction of the directional light the orientation of camera So, what’s the difference between them?
8
votes
3answers
316 views

“A similar hat to Jane” vs “A hat similar to Jane’s”

Of late I have noticed British people using the following sort of construct: John and Jane make such a cute couple because John always wears a similar hat to Jane. To my ear, that is ...
0
votes
2answers
135 views

Employing comparative forms without explicit comparison

To highlight our company's benefits, we write short statements like "3 times less rate" or "3 times lower rate". Are these correct? Or do such forms require comparison to something else—for ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

“He is better than _____.” (1) I (2) I am?

Which of the following constructions is / are correct? He is better than I. He is better than I am. PS: I'm unfamiliar with this site and its workings, so forgive me if my question fails to follow ...
2
votes
2answers
163 views

So long as they aren't answering [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “So long as” vs. “as long as” It is no problem so long as they aren't answering. I think that's not a correct phrase, but I can't find out how to correct it.
2
votes
4answers
94 views

X are equivalent to Y in Z

I'm pretty new to English StackExchange, and English is not my first language, so I'm not even sure what tags to look for. So, I apologize if this has been discussed before. I'm writing up a blog and ...
2
votes
2answers
351 views

“Talk with” vs “talk live with”

What is the difference between talk with people and talk live with people? I think all kinds of talk is live. If so, why we would say talk live with people?
1
vote
6answers
3k views

Difference between “Better than” and “More than”

Is it always possible to use "better than" and "more than" interchangeably? Many users prefer the look and feel of A better than B. Many users prefer the look and feel of A more than B. Edit: ...
4
votes
4answers
6k views

Difference between “affiliated” and “associated”

What is the difference between being affiliated and being associated with a group of people?
8
votes
2answers
1k views

“I so much as look” doesn't make any sense to me

There is a conversation in Californication season 5, ep. 9 where Tyler talks to Charlie and Charlie says: - I'd love to Tyler, but they watch me like a hawk here - I so much as look at a ...
1
vote
5answers
1k views

Idiom to say something beats something else greatly in a rivalry situation

Say for example we are comparing the hotness of weather of two countries or cities. They are both hot, but one beats another one to a great extent. Lets say we are comparing Dubai to Death Valley. How ...
4
votes
4answers
17k views

What is the difference between “aged” and “age”?

I've seen a few ways of discussing the age of a person. For example: aged 11 age 11 As well as: college aged students college age students When should I use "age" and when ...
0
votes
2answers
983 views

“Difference between” multiple choices (vs. “among”) [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “between” vs “among” I learned that "between" refers to two objects or concepts and "among" refers to three or more. However, in situations when ...
10
votes
3answers
2k views

“You know more about this than me/I” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: I can run faster than _. (1) him (2) he? Which is correct? You know more about this than me. You know more about this than I. The second sounds unnatural, but ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Difference between “social” and “societal”

What's the difference between social and societal? Are they perfectly synonymous? If not, what is the difference in nuance? The relevant definition of social reads: relating to society or its ...
2
votes
2answers
716 views

Does “No more” by necessity imply there was some before?

If I say "I have no more apples" do I have to have had some apples to begin with? Is there an instance where I could start with none and still say I had no more sensically?
-2
votes
0answers
195 views

Confusion regarding “I” and “me” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: I can run faster than _. (1) him (2) he? Which one is correct? He is taller than I. He is taller than me.
5
votes
1answer
213 views

Can I use an explicit verb in a comparison clause?

It seems that I often write something like this: The sizes of these datasets seem to grow faster than the processing power of computers does. Now, a longish text I'd written was proofread (by a ...
1
vote
0answers
252 views

Compare usage between punctuation variants [closed]

This got a bit lost in the excitement over my first question, (k+1)th or (k+1)st?, so I thought I'd spin it off into its own question. I'm not sure if this is too abstract to be appropriate for this ...
4
votes
2answers
232 views

“The most distant ever visited by a spacecraft from Earth”

This is from the transcript of a podcast: Now, these pictures can be a bit messy. So scientists say they could use plenty of eyes to help scan the pics for things that move—the same way Tombaugh ...
7
votes
1answer
461 views

How to compare frequency of word use over time between British and American English?

Google Ngram viewer allows one to compare the frequencies of a set of phrases over time. It even allows you to restrict that comparison to an American corpus, or separately to an English one. What I ...
4
votes
1answer
263 views

Scottish vs. scotch

I looked up the dictionary, and both gave me definitions that refer to a people from Scotland. Is there a difference between these two words?