2
votes
7answers
1k views

What is the difference between a scenario and situation?

Based on a survey done globally I have been tasked with writing a help guide to cover scenarios and situations - for a cloud app I created. But I don't understand what the difference is between a ...
0
votes
2answers
110 views

Rouge or Rogue? [closed]

Is there a difference between the two? I want to write a sentence which says Users Go Mad, and would like to know the correct word to use here. Is this just American/British difference?
3
votes
2answers
3k views

Difference in usage of terms “company” and “firm”

In a meaning of officially registered and bounded business unit. Like "Microsoft" or "Apple" or "ZARA" or copy shop round the corner. In some books on management/entrepreneurship authors use both ...
2
votes
2answers
432 views

“As [adjective] as a [noun]” vs “as [adjective] a [noun] as there”

How does the meaning differ for the following two sentences? Even then, the subject seemed as fascinating a problem as there could be. Even then, the subject seemed as fascinating as a ...
-1
votes
1answer
701 views

What is the meaning of “A is not as old as B”? [closed]

In my understanding, the following sentence A is not as old as B. may have 2 meanings, either A is older than B or A is newer than B . So what is the actual meaning of "A is ...
5
votes
5answers
16k views

Which is higher — “hyper-”, “ultra-” or “super-”? [closed]

According to OED, hyper-: over, beyond, over much, above measure ultra-: beyond super-: over, above, higher than They all have the meaning "higher than", but what is the order of ...
4
votes
4answers
5k views

Difference between “affiliated” and “associated”

What is the difference between being affiliated and being associated with a group of people?
4
votes
4answers
14k views

What is the difference between “aged” and “age”?

I've seen a few ways of discussing the age of a person. For example: aged 11 age 11 As well as: college aged students college age students When should I use "age" and when ...
2
votes
2answers
684 views

Does “No more” by necessity imply there was some before?

If I say "I have no more apples" do I have to have had some apples to begin with? Is there an instance where I could start with none and still say I had no more sensically?