Questions about grammaticality of comparisons

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multiple times vs many times [migrated]

I want to say that I remember a name if I hear it three or four times. What should I say? I remember a name if I hear it multiple times. OR I remember a name if I hear it many times. I ...
3
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2answers
39 views

What is the difference between “history” and “log”?

In computer science, "log" is often used over "history" when keeping track of events (see /log and .log in Unix filesystems, and "git log" with the Git version control system). I can see that "log" is ...
2
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1answer
28 views

If two lists are the same, do they coincide? [closed]

Let's say our science group at the university has computed a list of values, like e.g. the masses of all the planets in the solar system. Some other group abroad computed the same list and got exactly ...
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0answers
24 views

Periphrastic Forms for Comparative and Superlative forms of Adjectives [duplicate]

I am looking for examples to show a student who is taking GCSE English; they frequently stick more in where I consider it is not required, never using, for example for easy, 'easier' / 'easiest'. ...
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3answers
46 views

Simile with a noun in the middle? [closed]

He expected as good of a performance as Sam's. Or He expected as good as performance as Sam. (sounds very wrong to me) He expected as good of a performance as Sam.
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2answers
88 views

What are the best words to describe subjects being compared?

I tried to Google this but no luck so far. I was wondering if there was proper words to describe the comparison of 2 subjects? The first subject would be the object being compared in relation to the ...
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0answers
45 views

Word order in a complex comparison sentence [closed]

I'm having trouble deciding which word order to use in the sentence I don't know how much better our system will be than others. Is this correct, or should the "than others" part be after "...
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1answer
58 views

Equivalent to “pairwise” for a triplet [closed]

Pairwise may describe the process of comparing entities in pairs. What is the word for the process of describing the comparison of entities in triplet?
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1answer
36 views

like that of + possessive noun [duplicate]

I came across this sentence: "His memory was like that of a baby." I was wondering why the possessive "baby's" wasn't used and why "baby" is acceptable whereas the possessive form is required in ...
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1answer
21 views

Use of dashes or commas when adding a qualifier

For the following, I'm not sure how to separate each component of the sentence: After the standard battery of tests, factual verifications (Who's the president? — Obama) and autobiographical ...
2
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1answer
75 views

Comparisons with the word “twice” — i.e. twice as expensive vs. twice more expensive

Why is it that it's okay to say "This dress is twice as expensive as this jacket" but not okay to say "This dress is twice more expensive than this jacket" ? Furthermore, it seems okay to me so say, ...
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0answers
27 views

'as good asymptotically as' or 'asymptotically as good as'?

In terms of grammar, should I say 'The error bound of AA is as good asymptotically as that of BB' OR 'The error bound of AA is asymptotically as good as that of BB' ? Or both are correct?
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2answers
35 views

Is there such phrase as “what more”?

In sentences that I want to emphasize the ability of a person to do a certain task at a greater degree than another person, will it make sense to use "what more"? If Canelo can do that to Khan, ...
3
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1answer
53 views

“In contrast with” or “In contrast to” (or something else)?

In my writing I often like to make a comparison between two things. However, I'm not sure how I should start my sentence and if it's even a good idea to start it this way. Example: React has a ...
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4answers
58 views

If we say A is weaker than B by a factor of x, then should x be smaller or bigger than 1?

In math, we always need to derive different algorithms to get a tighter error bound. It may be correct almost surely that: the error bound of B is better than that of A by a factor x (x is bigger than ...
1
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1answer
42 views

Comparing different (but related) qualities in English

I was recently trying to express a sentiment like the following. New York is bluer than South Carolina is red. (For those not familiar with U.S. political jargon, blue = Democratic and red = ...
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0answers
26 views

Should the usual way to construct a comparative sentence be singular or plural?

Let's say I want to compare two animals A rabbit runs faster than a turtle or Rabbits run faster than turtles. Which one should I prefer?
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1answer
49 views

…achieved, on average, mixed results at best…?

Does this phrase even make sense? To say that [a particular approach] "achieved, on average, mixed results at best". I'm concerned about the combination of 'on average', 'mixed results', and ...
2
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2answers
81 views

“I don't give a fig” degrees of comparison

It's absolutely OK to say something like "My liver pain bothers me more than my nose bleeding" right? But what about the opposite attitude. If I don't really care about something, can I compare it ...
2
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2answers
321 views

Why does “He is as rich as any in our town” mean “He is one of the richest people in our town”?

According to my textbook, the sentence He is as rich as any in our town. has the same meaning as the following one: He is one of the richest people in our town. Is it right? It seems that ...
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3answers
57 views

What is compared in ''than I thought''?

Let's take a sample sentence: This game is funnier than I thought. We compare the game. The game is funny, but not as I thought first. We are trying to find what is compared to the game.
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2answers
64 views

Are both comparisons correct?

I thought that the error was C because I thought the comparison should have been: Because sound waves travel faster in liquids than in gases, the speed of sound in water is greater than that of ...
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2answers
59 views

to be riddled with something vs to teem with something

I'd like to ask how verbs 'to be riddled with something' (idiom) and 'to teem with something' (phrasal verb) overlap each other and can we replace with one another in the same sentence? For example: ...
2
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5answers
102 views

Word choice for a comparison of different amounts

I'm currently struggling to clearly state the following situation: Background: Let's assume I have two newspaper articles A and B. Let's say I want to count how often a specific word (for instance ...
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1answer
27 views

surpass he or his, possessive or pronoun

Mary and John were given the same task. In the end, Mary's work is better, and far exceeds his/him. Is "him" grammatically incorrect here?
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2answers
57 views

Use of “as” with verbs? [closed]

Would you say: I don't know anybody who has as much energy as John. or I don't know anybody who has as much energy as John does.
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1answer
85 views

'compare [something] with/to [something]' vs. 'compare'

Should I always compare something with/to something? In many texts you see structures like this one, from Maciej Paszynski, Fast Solvers for Mesh-Based Computations: After several steps, we end up ...
2
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1answer
103 views

Use of “that of” (e.g. “that of in”)

Sentence in question: The total amount of donation in 2010 has surpassed that of in 1990. Can you use "that of" as a tool to compare the difference in volume of a same thing in different years?
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2answers
123 views

Which is the right sentence to compare multiple objects with different properties?

I'm writing a scientific paper in which there is a statement on the comparison of multiple objects with different properties. Actually, I would like to compare among A with P1, A with P2, B, and C. ...
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1answer
113 views

“Prefer … to” vs. “prefer … rather than”

Can we use "prefer" and "rather than" together? E.g., I prefer walking rather than driving.
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2answers
66 views

How to use the comparison--“Not like…but then” and what does “be less than peas in a pod” mean?

Tommen was a sweet boy. Not like his brother (Joffery), but then Jaime and Tyrion were some what less than peas in a pod themselves. This sentence is extracted from the Game of Thrones. I don't ...
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0answers
28 views

deletion of the verb after a non-fixed-expression 'as … as' comparison

I think my concern will be best illustrated by an example: "Minors do not have as many rights as adults" I have always found myself questioning whether I need to add a "do" after or before "...
2
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1answer
37 views

How do I state the sameness of some number of objects?

How do you say something is identical and having a quantity greater than two using “(the) same”? Which is right among below? If there’s no right form, please let me know the right form to describe ...
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2answers
50 views

“large field of view” vs “high field of view”

Which one is right between "large field of view" and "high field of view"?
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1answer
195 views

How can you describe “percentage” in a sentence?

I need to compare two system and explain that one is faster than the other specifying the percentage, so is the following correct? in fact new system computes the whole dataset the 10% percent ...
2
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1answer
162 views

“The box of candies” or “The box of THE candies”

I understand that "Look on the table. Take the box of candies." is ok. But is this ok? "Take the box of the candies." If so, is there any difference?
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1answer
67 views

“What” vs “what kind of”

So, I've read that questions "what kind of" are about characteristics: "What kind of game is it? - It's an exciting game." But "What game is it? - It's Warcraft." Is it right? But what about "What ...
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2answers
87 views

SAT Grammar Question - Comparisons [closed]

I have a question on comparisons. I said no error first, and that was wrong. I don't see an error with B or D or A. Is it C "being"? Should it be switched to be?
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2answers
152 views

“I am extremely smarter than you.”

Is "I am extremely smarter than you." a grammatically OK sentence? It sounds awkward, but is there a grammatical issue? Please note that I am not asking if it could sound better, nor am I asking for ...
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1answer
48 views

How do I modify “fewer”? [closed]

In a sentence using fewer as a comparison between the present time and other occurrences, I might want to adjust the comparison. Are there any rules about how to modify fewer? Does it vary if the ...
3
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1answer
18k views

Is “I am more than happy to help you” grammatically correct?

Ok, I often hear my American teacher says "I am more than happy to help you". I am not sure it is grammatically correct. Ok, there is no problem to say "I am happy to help you" or "I am very happy ...
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2answers
360 views

Use of “unlike” while comparing two things, followed by a comma and “in something else”

I am wondering, which one is correct: Unlike in something, in something else it is easy to... Unlike something, in something else it is easy to... My instinct tells me both versions could ...
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1answer
5k views

Kinder vs More Kind [duplicate]

Do we say "kinder" or "more kind"? I found people saying both things over the internet and got confused. Which is the correct one?
0
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1answer
52 views

What's the difference between tethering and hitching an animal?

Hitching, tethering, picketing, or securing any pack or saddle stock within 200 feet slope distance of any permanent lake, stream, spring, pond. or shelter. Doesn't both mean tying an animal to a ...
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4answers
3k views

What is it called when comparing two opposite people or things

Can someone please let me know what is the technique called when I compare two people who are very different? In my case, it is Donald Woods when he first meets Steve Biko in the film Cry Freedom. I ...
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1answer
89 views

Help! So as not to vs. so (adjective) not to

I have seen the following phrases "so as not to" and "so (adjective) as not to" in articles before, but I don't know how to use these two phrase correctly. Any advice or insight would be very helpful. ...
0
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1answer
61 views

Can I put a time description after “than”?

Today, despite widely available technology such as high-resolution scanners and printers, counterfeiting is more difficult than it was at the time of the Civil War, when it was estimated that one-...
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2answers
2k views

Comma Placement: “From x to y and z”

While writing an essay the other day, I was curious about how to correctly phrase a sentence such as the one below: "From dogs, to cats and fish, owning a pet can allow for a multitude of mental, ...
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3answers
713 views

What does “not as [adjective] as him” imply?

If it is written that X is not as tall as Y, it indicates that X and Y have unequal heights. But does this necessarily imply that X is shorter than Y?
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1answer
642 views

The higher of X and Y vs the higher of X or Y

For "higher of" sentences, is it correct to use X and Y, or do you use X or Y? The following example: Recoverable amount: the higher of an asset's fair value less costs of disposal (sometimes ...