Questions about grammaticality of comparisons

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
1answer
22 views

mass would be lower than {their masses}

I am wondering if I am supposed to put "their masses" in this sentence: "The mass of the anhydrous salt and the water evaporated after heating would be lower than {their masses} if the compound had ...
1
vote
1answer
27 views

“Like X but a little less Y and a little more Z”

Like X but a (little/lot) less Y and a (little/lot) more Z. Is there a name for this type of comparison? It's not really an analogy (or is it?) It's not a simile or a dissimile. Examples of ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Is it common to write only one “as” in a comparison?

This is a bit hard to explain, so here's an example: Hanging above the door was a huge smiley face put there to greet visitors. I hoped the people inside were just as friendly. Is this a ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Grammar rules for comparisons with similar structures

The original quote I would rather suffer the pain of discipline than suffer the pain of regret Variations: I would rather suffer the pain of discipline than the pain of regret I would ...
2
votes
1answer
86 views

The connection between roosters and genitalia

It is a known fact that the same word (same spelling and pronunciation) is used to describe both a rooster and a part of male genitalia (I am not sure how vulgar it would be of me to use the word ...
0
votes
2answers
85 views

How to use “in comparison” in this sentence [closed]

How can I use "in comparison" in the following sentence, without changing its context or meaning? Computers-based communication is extremely fast, telephone services are slow
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Completeness of a Reference in a Comparison [duplicate]

Which of these examples is clear or gramatically sound? Is there a general term or a resource for the grammatical issue -- when the reference of a comparison doesn't match the object being compared? ...
0
votes
2answers
70 views

Why do we say “rips and tears”?

For example, "Clothing must be free from rips and tears." It seems to me that the words "rips" and "tears" can be used interchangeably, and that using both is redundant. Is there a particular reason ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

“Major”, “Minor”: Any words for gauging more importance or less? [closed]

I am writing a list of descriptions of how much or how little importance is attached to an issue under discussion or to a product feature under consideration. I would like to have three or four ...
2
votes
3answers
376 views

When do you leave out the preposition in a relative clause?

A non-fiction titled "Do the Right Thing" published in 1998 has this sentence: (1) Am I treating this stranger with the same consideration that I would a friend? Another book (fiction) titled ...
6
votes
3answers
449 views

Word that indicates that “lower is better”, such as scoring in golf

Is there a word that could be used in an instance where you want to indicate that a lower number is better than a positive number? For instance, In golf, scores are _______. to indicate that a low ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Extra vs Extraneous [closed]

I always thought "extra" is nothing but an abbreviation for "extraneous". However a friend of mine pointed out that the two are listed differently in the dictionaries, and have slightly different ...
1
vote
1answer
31 views

Comparison error

Because of its innovativeness and its effective presentation, Mary's science project received more judges' votes at the exhibit than did Jim. The "did Jim" part was incorrect, and I was kind of ...
2
votes
1answer
93 views

“Refurbish” vs. “Furbish”

Question is as title says. Is there any difference between refurbish and furbish or for all intents and purposes are they synonyms? These are the 2 levels I would like to discuss: Differences on ...
0
votes
5answers
173 views

Which grammatical features does English lack, which it is expressively poorer for? [closed]

Which grammatical features does English lack, which it is expressively poorer for? These could be features found in other languages – living, extinct or invented – or even be completely new ...
1
vote
1answer
116 views

Is “no other” + comparative grammatically correct?

There is no other harsher critic than yourself. I'm really stumped on this one. The more I read it the less correct it sounds. I think the word harsher is making the sentence sound fairly off ...
0
votes
2answers
531 views

“Behaves similar to” or “behaves similarly to”?

I wrote the following comment in a programming forum: Objects in JavaScript behave similar to a regular associative array. This is how I would use the word "similar" in normal conversation. ...
0
votes
3answers
69 views

How to express connection between several items

I want to express a connection from one thing to several other items in one phrase. Specifically, how can I correct the following paragraph: Ghahremani et al (2013) showed that a significant ...
0
votes
1answer
116 views

“Not only . . . but (also)” correlative conjunction question

The amount of jobs that have been transferred out of state in the past five years is staggering; not only manufacturing jobs but white-collar ones have moved as well. Is this appropriate usage of ...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

“The new guys are dressed a lot nicer than we/us” [duplicate]

Does anyone know the correct word choice between "we" and "us", and explain the reason why? Thanks!
-1
votes
1answer
84 views

Prepositions used with “different”? [duplicate]

I apologize if this question has been asked before; I couldn't find it in a site search. I have this sentence about teaching children safety rules: The rules are different when you are together with ...
0
votes
2answers
87 views

similar to & the same as [duplicate]

Why don't we use " 's "(possessive S) in the first sentence as in the second one? I have the same color eyes as my father. My personality is very similar to my father's. Can we use "my ...
1
vote
1answer
907 views

Difference between 'As compared to' and 'When compared to'

Is there any rule governing when the phrase "As compared to..." should be used, and when "When compared to..." should be used? Or, do they mean the same, in all contexts?
2
votes
2answers
96 views

Is using “too” correct in “As X, so too Y”? [closed]

Is the usage of "too" correct in this sentence? As the systems we simulate become increasingly complex, so too does the task of validation.
6
votes
1answer
133 views

Grammar rules for parellelism in comparisons and variations according to verb placement

I'm an academic editor in the field of medicine and I often come across complex comparisons. My question is specifically regarding how the placement of the verb affects the the parallelism of the ...
2
votes
4answers
84 views

“Looks more genuine than me/I writing”

In the following sentence, which is more appropriate — I or me, and why? Sending separate mails will look more genuine than me/I writing on behalf of everyone.
2
votes
2answers
129 views

As fast as Or As fast

He is as clever if not cleverer than his brother. Ranjeet is as fast as or perhaps faster than Rohit. Are both these sentences correct? As per Wren And Martin High School English Grammar ...
4
votes
6answers
641 views

Can an adverb be a noun?

I have seen this post for the answer to my question, but this is not much help in case of the question I am going to ask. Here is an example sentence - The new design of Twitter profile is more ...
2
votes
2answers
338 views

What is wrong with mixing “taller” and “tallest” like this?

Although the towers appear identical, the west tower is the tallest, standing 16 feet taller than the east tower. What might be wrong? Does it have to do with comparative and superlative degrees? ...
2
votes
6answers
536 views

What is the simile for dust? [closed]

What is the simile used when comparing to dust? And what does that comparison imply? Something similar to "as slick as a fox"
0
votes
2answers
122 views

How to express the trend in this graph using the appropriate phrases?

I have this graph and I want to describe the difference in the take off trajectory of two patterns in the figure below. The first pattern is seen in the first two parameters over the years from the ...
0
votes
2answers
232 views

How to compare between two incomparable things, yet similar in some aspects?

I want to compare between results seen in healthy cells and in tumor cells. The same finding was seen in both types of cells. I know that this is not like apples-to-apples comparison, but still both ...
4
votes
2answers
226 views

How to say this using catch-phrases: “Test A requires a lot of tissue samples, whereas test B doesn't.”?

I am about to prepare a talk that would compare two tests in the medical field. The old test requires 5 different sites of the organ to be sampled in order to have a result. The other test (which is ...
2
votes
7answers
2k views

What is the difference between a scenario and situation?

Based on a survey done globally I have been tasked with writing a help guide to cover scenarios and situations - for a cloud app I created. But I don't understand what the difference is between a ...
25
votes
19answers
6k views

Was I driving more than 5 mph under the speed limit, or less than 5 mph under the speed limit?

Suppose I am driving 38 miles per hour in a 45 zone. This, of course, is seven miles per hour under the speed limit. Of course, I am driving this slowly because the road is wet, and safe driving ...
1
vote
3answers
184 views

An analogy to describe an individual who merges traits he finds from others in order to develop his own identity? [closed]

I am writing a research paper in which my thesis concerns how a character matures through his merging of characteristic traits in his relationships with other characters. How can I introduce this ...
0
votes
1answer
82 views

Can a participle contain a comparison to other object?

Can a participle contain a comparison to another object in the same sentence? For example, is the following sentence grammatically correct? "I can't see any vehicle moving at higher speed that ...
2
votes
2answers
379 views

As much as “you” or “you do”

I came across this sentence in a blog.. "You'll receive no more than 1-2 emails per week, as we hate spam just as much as you. " While I appreciate the sentiment, i can't help but wonder if they hate ...
0
votes
1answer
83 views

Are these the same or different? [duplicate]

What's the difference between these two sentences? This movie is hardly as interesting as that one. That movie is almost more interesting than this one. I would like a native speaker's ...
0
votes
1answer
321 views

Positive and negative clause comparison in the same sentence

What is the right way to perform a positive and a negative adverb comparison in the beginning of the sentence? As an example, which of the following ways is correct: Similarly to yesterday, and ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

“Any vs. ”any other“ and ”every“ vs. ”every other"

Can you please clarify what difference in meanings exists between the sentences in the following two pairs: Tom is taller than any boy present in the class. Tom is taller than any other ...
0
votes
2answers
143 views

Rouge or Rogue? [closed]

Is there a difference between the two? I want to write a sentence which says Users Go Mad, and would like to know the correct word to use here. Is this just American/British difference?
0
votes
2answers
71 views

Is this that-clause for set comparison or a relative?

[i] It was lucky that Harry had tea with Hagrid to look forward to, because the Potions lesson turned out to be the worst thing that had happened to him so far. –– Harry Potter and the ...
1
vote
2answers
136 views

How would you characterize the phrase 'a more perfect union'? [closed]

My question pertains to the usage of 'a more perfect union' in its original context-- the preamble to the U.S. Constitution. I want to say that this is a metaphor, because the authors are using the ...
0
votes
2answers
310 views

Comparison grammar: repeating the main verb vs. using a helper verb

Is the following grammatically correct? Corporation X spends a larger percentage of its revenue on insurance than Corporation Y does on employee salaries. Should it not be: Corporation X ...
3
votes
2answers
5k views

Difference in usage of terms “company” and “firm”

In a meaning of officially registered and bounded business unit. Like "Microsoft" or "Apple" or "ZARA" or copy shop round the corner. In some books on management/entrepreneurship authors use both ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Comparisons: “so [adjective/adverb] as” or “as [adjective/adverb] as”

When learning how to make comparisons, students of English as a foreign language are first told to use the structure "as [adjective/adverb] as". However, at higher levels, they are told that both ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views
2
votes
2answers
640 views

“As [adjective] as a [noun]” vs “as [adjective] a [noun] as there”

How does the meaning differ for the following two sentences? Even then, the subject seemed as fascinating a problem as there could be. Even then, the subject seemed as fascinating as a ...
0
votes
2answers
386 views

Is there a word that describes both “comparing” and “contrasting”?

I'm looking for a more succinct word/small phrase that conveys the idea of "comparing and contrasting". Is there a word that hits two birds with one stone by representing both similarities and ...