The form of an adjective or adverb used to compare two or more things. English comparatives are formed with the suffixes -er/-est or the words more/most.

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comparative phrase 'more than'

I don't know the meaning of the phrase in this sentence We are seldom exposed only to a single contaminant in the environment-but more often than not to a cocktail of chemical mixture. How ...
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Parallelism in comparative sentencs

Is this sentence parallel because "to be" and "to live" are both infinitives? "It is better to be honest to yourself than to live a life of deception."
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39 views

An alternative term for 'lesser time'

I have to process with different speeds. In other words, one of them requires lesser time. I think 'Lesser time' is an awkward term. Is there any good alternative or synonym which I can use instead of ...
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'as good asymptotically as' or 'asymptotically as good as'?

In terms of grammar, should I say 'The error bound of AA is as good asymptotically as that of BB' OR 'The error bound of AA is asymptotically as good as that of BB' ? Or both are correct?
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46 views

Using subjunctive form in Comparative-Correlatives

Is it possible to use subjunctive form in a comparative correlative (The+the) clause? For example, is the below sentence correct? The closer the objects be to each-other, the more beautiful the ...
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Is there a comparative form of “well”?

Is there a word that means "more well", in the same way that "better" means "more good"? In common parlance most people just use "better" for this purpose, but this sounds wrong and is a nagging ...
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34 views

the meaning of 'case' in this sentence

I don't understand the meaning of case in this sentence: That may be wise policy, but it will also create an impression that many more potential problems exist than is the case. I also don't ...
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40 views

Old or older people

Which is grammatically correct? Old people are often lonely. Or Older people are often lonely. I understand context matters. I just want to know when it is right to use one or the other.
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Use of the superlative when only two items are present

When speaking with my mother a couple of days ago, I read to her a message I was sending to my cousin on her behalf ending with: "... the birthday of your youngest." [implying her child] She ...
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39 views

Definite Article in front of the word 'better' [closed]

Is it wrong to have 'the' in front of the word 'better'? Can someone help me sort this confusion out? Case in point: "Ella is the better of the two sisters" vs "Ella is the best of the two sisters". ...
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How do you say “more to the east”? Easter, Easterer, Easterner, Easternerer?

One can sure write “east to you” or “more to the east”, but if I'm located in London and you're in Berlin, can I say that you're “easter” than me?
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Should the usual way to construct a comparative sentence be singular or plural?

Let's say I want to compare two animals A rabbit runs faster than a turtle or Rabbits run faster than turtles. Which one should I prefer?
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What phrase can I use to compare a situation to something which is never going to happen?

My sentence is: There is a rule that you must come to training unless....? I need something like 'pigs flying outside the window' but more formal.
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What are sentences like “the longer X, the more Y” called and can they be used in formal written English?

What is the type of sentence exemplified below called? Is it appropriate to use it in a scientific paper and formal written English in general? 1. The more pronounced the variation, the more the ...
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2answers
71 views

sooner than possible vs as soon as possible [closed]

I wonder if someone could help me. I always use "as soon as possible" but in many occasions I've also heard "sooner than possible", which I would never use because it seems quite weird to me. Am I ...
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2answers
78 views

Can I say “No other mountains in Europe are higher than Mont Blanc”?

In my text book there is a sentence No other mountain in Europe is higher than Mont Blanc. Can it be paraphrased as No other mountains in Europe are higher than Mont Blanc. ? If so, is ...
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2answers
60 views

Are both comparisons correct?

I thought that the error was C because I thought the comparison should have been: Because sound waves travel faster in liquids than in gases, the speed of sound in water is greater than that of ...
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1answer
54 views

Send a “smaller” message or send a “shorter” message? [closed]

I would like to know which comparative is correct when saying something like the following. The maximum size of a message is 150 words. Please send a [smaller|shorter] message. Thank you very ...
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3answers
247 views

more unhealthy vs. unhealthier

First off, I'm not a native speaker but this question isn't about the rules themselves but rather usage in the USA. I learnt that you should say 'unhealthier' (and the Oxford + Longman dictionaries I ...
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55 views

Is there a linguistic term the type of solecism of using “more X” when “Xer” is the established comparative?

So I posted a joke on Facebook, and one of the peanut gallery chimed in that where I'd used vaster, he would have preferred more vast. Leaving aside the question of whether vaster itself is ...
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4answers
132 views

“It is better to X than to Y” - the structure of a difficult comparative sentence

Take the following sentence: It is better to underestimate your abilities and overestimate your risks than to go in a direction that actually involves more uncertainty than you can justify. For ...
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1answer
80 views

Use of the adjective “young” in the comparative form

Is correct to use the adjective "young" for objects? For example, in a sentence like this: "This painting is younger than that one.", I think it would be better to use "new" for "painting", but then, ...
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32 views

Can I use a comparative adjective as a noun?

Can I use a comparative adjective as a noun, as in the following sentence: "The older told him to stop." Or do I have to use "one", as in: "The older one told him to stop." Thanks in advance!
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“It's as same watch as the one I lost.” - What is wrong with the sentence?

Are the following sentences grammatically correct? If not, what's wrong with them? It's as same watch as the one I lost. It's the same watch as I lost.
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Smaller vs. less vs. lesser

I am confused as to some of the vocabulary that can be used to compare numbers and quantities, and would very much appreciate some clarification. I suppose it is safe to say that 1 is smaller than ...
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3answers
4k views

Is “oftener” obsolete?

Does any native speaker of the English Language ever use oftener instead of more often?
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Is “I am more than happy to help you” grammatically correct?

Ok, I often hear my American teacher says "I am more than happy to help you". I am not sure it is grammatically correct. Ok, there is no problem to say "I am happy to help you" or "I am very happy ...
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“How much is faster the train than the car?” [closed]

How much is faster the train than the car? How much is the train faster than the car? Which one is correct?
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Is “very less” correct English?

Is using very less correct English? My friend suggests it should be very little. Are they both correct, or is there a difference?
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2answers
520 views

Comparative form of shy [duplicate]

I've been looking for this answer a lot and people say diferent things are true. Is it shyer and the shyest, shier and shiest or more shy and the most shy? According to Merriam-Webster dictionary it's ...
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5answers
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the idiomatic use of “no more than” and “no less than”

I have questions about the use of no more than and no less than . The following is the item 14. phrase of the word more from COBUILD online dictionary. You use no more than or not more than when ...
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The rhetorical effect of “no more … than” construction

The following is a part of the section 15.70 of A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language (Longman). Rachel is no more courageous than Saul(is). The sentence implies that both ...
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1answer
61 views

Can ungradable adjectives be used as gradable?

I was under the impression that ungradable adjectives cannot have comparative forms in any circumstances, because there are no degrees in those adjectives. But I found a quotation from George Orwell ...
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119 views

What is the base form called of a superlative or comparative adjective? [duplicate]

Motivation: I'm doing a text-mining project and I'd like to map all forms of an adjective to their "base-form". Example: bigger -> big biggest -> big stronger -> strong strongest ...
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242 views

“I have more bikes and cars than him” [closed]

I have more bikes and cars than him. Gotham has more traffic lights and large roads than Paris. Are these right or wrong? Note: I didn't compare the size of their roads. I compared the ...
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222 views

a shorter time/less time

This takes less time than that. This takes a shorter time than that. Why is 'a' necessary is the second and not the first example?
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the duplicated expression “over more than”

There are over more than 3,000 people in the stadium. What do you think about this duplicated expression "over more than"? Does the redundant wording serve to intensify? Or is it wrong?
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1answer
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“Human feelings are quite complex than of animals” - What should I put after “than”?

I want to write something meaning "humans have more complicated feelings than animals have." I wrote the following but I am not sure if "of" is the correct choice or not. Nevertheless, human ...
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71 views

Comparative words after the subject

I'm really having trouble figuring out how to describe a clause describing a subject which contains a comparative adjective (or an adjective of equality). For example: Children [shorter than four ...
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184 views

How can you describe “percentage” in a sentence?

I need to compare two system and explain that one is faster than the other specifying the percentage, so is the following correct? in fact new system computes the whole dataset the 10% percent ...
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4answers
216 views

Can something be “blacker” than something else? How common are single-word comparatives and superlatives for color-designating adjectives?

Merriam-Webster implies that the comparative and superlative for black are blacker and blackest. However, my native British colleague says he would never used blacker, only more black. How common is ...
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5answers
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Morbid curiosity about “more better”

I have a grammatical question regarding one of the worst pieces of grammar imaginable. One of my students made the argument that better things could be considered a single item. Is it possible for the ...
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Thoughts on today's article on “farther” vs “further”?

See the article for context. Seems like a plausible suggestion to me, but I'm curious what others think. Consider the house, tree, and sunflower in the illustration at the top of this post. The ...
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2answers
138 views

“I am extremely smarter than you.”

Is "I am extremely smarter than you." a grammatically OK sentence? It sounds awkward, but is there a grammatical issue? Please note that I am not asking if it could sound better, nor am I asking for ...
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3k views

“worse” vs. “less better”

What is the right way to convey the meaning that I want to say? Your job is worse than mine, so I am not going to quit my job. Is there a better choice to say this? Should I use less better than ...
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comparatives - “easier” or “more easy”, “friendlier” or “more friendly” [duplicate]

Yes, this is a question that people keep repeating about comparatives, especially with these adjectives: easy, pretty, friendly, lively. I know the rule about two-syllable adjectives ending in /i/ ...
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2answers
583 views

Can we use “elder to” as a comparative adjective?

As I understand, in comparative form of Adjectives, elder is used of persons, and older is used of both persons or things. One other feature of elder is that it is not used with than. However, it is ...
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Are the rules regarding absolute modifiers too absolute?

A common grammar lesson that was taught to me in the US and that I've had to teach abroad in EFL classrooms is that we're not to use adverbs of emphasis with absolute modifiers, just as we're not ...
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“How perfect is that?” [duplicate]

Is this proper usage ? seems to me "perfect" is like "best" (it can't be more or less "perfect or "best").