The form of an adjective or adverb used to compare two or more things. English comparatives are formed with the suffixes -er/-est or the words more/most.

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comparative construction used with pronouns, especially 'her'

I was recently pulled up by a colleague when I made a statement along the lines of I am a better player than her. My colleague suggested the correct statement should be better player than she is ...
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2answers
840 views

Justification of “more perfect” [closed]

I've just read this interesting article. We were being constantly told back in school years that we couldn't use "more" to modify "perfect". I kept feeling guilty using "more perfect" until I read ...
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0answers
190 views

“Prefer tea to/over coffee” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct: “prefer X to Y” or “prefer X over Y”? Which is correct? I prefer tea to coffee. I prefer tea over coffee.
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5answers
1k views

The comparative of “environmentally friendly”

When using the comparative with environmentally friendly would it be correct to say environmentally friendlier, or more environmentally friendly?
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7answers
2k views

Why “Greater Toronto” rather than “Great Toronto”

Many big cities have their names preceded by Greater. Why not just Great? Does Greater indicate that the city is ambitious to expand itself? Why is Greater not used for country names such as Great ...
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2answers
671 views

Does a comparative always need to compare with something?

As I understand it, comparatives compare with something. So something that is colder is more cold than another thing. However, can't a word like colder be used as an adjective without being compared ...
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2answers
296 views

“At least as much as skilled as”

Is this sentence right? Xs need to be at least as much as skilled as Ys. If not what should it be?
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3answers
3k views

Increasingly + positive or increasingly + comparative?

For instance, would you rather say "It became increasingly hard" or "It became increasingly harder"? From my understanding, both are possible, but their meaning is slightly different. The first ...
2
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2answers
751 views

Does “No more” by necessity imply there was some before?

If I say "I have no more apples" do I have to have had some apples to begin with? Is there an instance where I could start with none and still say I had no more sensically?
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6answers
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Are the rules regarding absolute modifiers too absolute?

A common grammar lesson that was taught to me in the US and that I've had to teach abroad in EFL classrooms is that we're not to use adverbs of emphasis with absolute modifiers, just as we're not ...
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3answers
6k views

Is “very less” correct English?

Is using very less correct English? My friend suggests it should be very little. Are they both correct, or is there a difference?
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5answers
7k views

What is the opposite of “Could you talk a little louder”?

In a conversation, when I don't hear someone, I usually say: Could you talk a little louder please? However, what should I say if: Someone is being very loud in the other room when talking on ...
2
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1answer
166 views

“Are you happier?”

I was reading an English book. This is a snippet of a conversation below: But please tell us... do you like your job? Are you happier? I am confused at happier. Why not use happy?
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3answers
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Is there a difference between “quicker” and “more quickly”

This is a follow up to this question: What is the difference between "quicker" and "faster"? "Quicker" is an adverb, as are "more" (in this context) and "quickly". So is there a ...
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12answers
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What is the difference between “quicker” and “faster”?

What is the correct word to use here and why: I will get there quicker [than you] vs. I will get there faster [than you] There must be similar adverbs for "slower".
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5answers
2k views

Are there any “-nk-” or “-nc-” words in English where there isn't a “ng” before the “k” sound?

In words like think and lank, we actually seem to be saying "thing-k" and "lang-k." Can anyone thing-k of any words or rules for sound use where this doesn't happen?
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5answers
8k views

“Lower number” vs. “smaller number”

Is −9 a smaller number than −8? And is −9 a lower number than −8? What is the difference between lower and smaller here?
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1answer
5k views

What's the comparative for the word “modern”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “More clear” vs “Clearer”, when to use “more” instead of “-er” What's the comparative for the word modern?
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0answers
131 views

Using superlatives for comparing two things [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Use of the superlative when only two items are present Is it strictly incorrect to use the superlative when comparing only two things? i.e. I have two sisters. Mary ...
2
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1answer
376 views

Am I right using “as” for equality and “than” to point out differences?

I would like to know whether I am right when I use "as" meaning: similar, equal or equivalent, and the comparative, "than", to point out a difference between the nouns.
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2answers
776 views

Multiple comparatives of different types: how to choose?

I have an eight-month-old daughter. Her experiments in mobility led me to contemplate phrases like the dirtier and messier, the better. What happens if one (but not both) of the adjectives ...
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2answers
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The meaning of “no more … than”

These two attitudes are no more contradictory than those two. Which of the following interpretations is right (or give me a better one if possible): Relatively, these two attitudes are not ...
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2answers
609 views

Do I need to use comparative degree?

Maybe it's a little long story. Maybe it's a little longer story.
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3answers
139 views

Is “more mainstream” a valid thing to write?

I'm writing a report talking about how a certain technique in my field has become 'more mainstream', but that phrase looks rather wrong. Is it a valid thing to say? Can something become "more ...
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3answers
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What is the correct usage of 'worse' and 'worst'?

I've noticed a lot of people who, according to the way I was taught, misuse the words 'worse' and 'worst'. The way I understand it, 'worse' is for comparisons, and 'worst' is the superlative. But more ...
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3answers
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Differences between “audio” and “sound”?

What is the difference between "audio" and "sound"? Is it possible that a beeping noise could be considered one but not the other?
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2answers
590 views

Omitted words in a comparison

The moon was smaller than yesterday. Is this correct, and the "how large it was" was just omitted and implied, as in The moon was smaller than (how large it was) yesterday. or is this a ...
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6answers
1k views

“More perfect” versus “less imperfect”

"More perfect" is presumably bad English (Preamble to the US Constitution notwithstanding), since something is either perfect (and thus can't be improved) or not. "Less imperfect", however, seems ...
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4answers
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Is 'uniquer' a word?

My spellcheck doesn't complain about 'uniquer'. Is it a valid word? Since unique means "one of a kind", 'uniquer' has no valid definition, but that doesn't prevent it from being a valid dictionary ...
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2answers
719 views

An adjective to describe a substance consisting of smaller-size grains

What adjective you would use to describe a substance consisting of grains of smaller size compared to those of another substance? For example, "Milk powder is ______er than sugar". Addition: And if ...
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7answers
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Use of the superlative when only two items are present

When speaking with my mother a couple of days ago, I read to her a message I was sending to my cousin on her behalf ending with: "... the birthday of your youngest." [implying her child] She ...
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6answers
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“Like something more” or “like something better”

When people like something more than something else, it's common for me to hear them say they like it better than something else. Is this proper English? I've always thought the word more fits better, ...
3
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1answer
2k views

Comparative and superlative adverbs?

I'm a native speaker of English, and I don't know how many times I've wanted to say "happilier" instead of "more happily", or "happiliest" instead of "most happily". Is there any record of such ...
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2answers
11k views

Is there a comparative form of “well”?

Is there a word that means "more well", in the same way that "better" means "more good"? In common parlance most people just use "better" for this purpose, but this seems incorrect and is a nagging ...
2
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1answer
991 views

“A less preferred approach”

I want to indicate that one approach to solve a problem is less preferred than another approach. How to phrase it correctly? Is it grammatically correct to state it this way? Modeling x and y ...
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5answers
375 views

formation of comparisons

Is it incorrect to phrase a comparison in the following way: Men are prone more than women to depression. Or must the adjective always follow more? Men are more prone than women to ...
3
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1answer
655 views

Rules for single-word comparatives and superlatives [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “More clear” vs “Clearer”, when to use “more” instead of “-er” Are there any rules for which words are allowed to have ...
11
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4answers
16k views

What are sentences like “the longer X, the more Y” called and can they be used in formal written English?

What is the type of sentence exemplified below called? Is it appropriate to use it in a scientific paper and formal written English in general? 1. The more pronounced the variation, the more the ...
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5answers
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Is “such a cooler” proper English?

I'm trying to say something like "that's such a cooler design". Is there more valid expression that expresses the same thing? Or is this okay English? I guess "that design is so much cooler" would ...
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6answers
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Mass nouns and counts nouns. Does getting it wrong ever matter?

Less/fewer, too much/too many, amount/number... When people get these things wrong, it bugs me. But I cannot think of a situation where mistaking a mass noun for a count noun (or vice versa) would ...
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5answers
241k views

“More clear” vs “Clearer”: when to use “more” instead of “-er”?

Which one of these adjectives is correct? I can see that both of them are being used, I'm just not sure which one is grammatically correct. Are there any general rules to follow as to the use of one ...