The form of an adjective or adverb used to compare two or more things. English comparatives are formed with the suffixes -er/-est or the words more/most.

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2
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35 views

“I've got more to do than wait” or “I've got more to do than **to** wait”? [duplicate]

I did some reading in other places online about using the bare infinitive after the word "than," and while in a lot of cases it seems correct, I'm having a hard time telling whether it's correct in ...
0
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2answers
91 views

Phrases to describe different conditions

For example, I measure test scores for different groups of students. When I present the results, should I say: Here are test scores with respect to different student groups. Or: Here are ...
1
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1answer
51 views

That of Tokyo vs. one of Tokyo?

The climate of Sapporo is colder than one of Tokyo. The climate of Sapporo is colder than that of Tokyo. Which is correct?
3
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6answers
2k views

In mathematics, when referring to pure numbers is largest or biggest correct?

When referring to a list of number is largest or biggest correct? For example, I want to find the biggest number in an array. Or should it be the largest number. Finally, would either biggest or ...
0
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1answer
143 views

Archaic gradation words/constructs synonymous to “more” and “less”?

Are there any adverbs/pronouns (or sentence constructs) that fulfilled the gradation role of more and less in Early Modern English, that currently fell out of use or exist only in marginal, archaic or ...
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1answer
401 views

“Too low for the price” or “too less for the price” [closed]

Too low for the price Too less for the price Please suggest which one is correct grammatically. Scenarios: The cost for 15 minute show was Rupees 50. It is too low for the price. I ...
0
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1answer
2k views

Lesser number vs. smaller number [duplicate]

I am wondering about the correct use of lesser/smaller in the following phrase: This library has a smaller/lesser number of books than the National Library. I did find another thread on nearly ...
7
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4answers
47k views

Conundrum: “cleverer” or “more clever”, “simpler” or “more simple” etc

I know the rule for making the comparative and superlative form for two-syllable words ending in y, replace the -y with i and use -er and -est: hap.py → happier → (the) happiest ti.dy → tidier → ...
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4answers
1k views

Can I use “lighterweight”?

The word "lightweight" simply means, "relatively light in weight." If I want to compare two lightweight objects, can I say: Is A lighterweight than B? Dictionaries don't seem to accept this as a ...
3
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1answer
137 views

Can you ever drop the first ‘as’ in “as . . . as” constructions?

I have wondered if dropping the first as is permissible and grammatical while using comparison: Ian Bell was organised and elegant as ever, prospering with several uppercuts over the slips. I ...
22
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6answers
4k views

Phrase: “Colder than a witch’s kiss!”

The following was used in a radio broadcast (The Adventures of Harry Lime, 14th December 1951, episode 20 “An Old Moorish Custom”) as Harry was hit on the back of his head with a rifle butt by a giant ...
4
votes
2answers
18k views

Comparative or superlative use of the word “far”

Which sentence is correct? The quarterback threw the ball farthest than anyone else on the team. The quarterback threw the ball farther than anyone else on the team. The quarterback threw the ball ...
4
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3answers
13k views

Should I write: “areas becoming denser” or “more dense”?

I am trying to describe how cities have been affected by the growing population in terms of the density of bodies. This is how I have it at the moment but I am unsure whether it should be "more ...
0
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1answer
60 views

Use of “more” with more than two items

Suppose we were to say that "California is one of the more pleasant states on the West Coast in terms of weather." Is this grammatically incorrect because there are more than two states on the West ...
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2answers
2k views

What is the comparative form of the adverb “nicely”?

The adjective nice can be inflected: nicer, nicest. Can the derived adverb nicely be inflected as well, or does it only have the absolute form?
0
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0answers
42 views

English language proper sentence [duplicate]

Which is correct of the following two sentences, one of which contains 'I', the other 'me'. That is the point of the question. In all other respects the sentences are the same. Someone bigger than ...
0
votes
1answer
442 views

Avoiding ambiguity of “more” + complex comparative

As hours flew by, we kept building more and more sophisticated fireworks than I'd planned. At best this is a garden path sentence. Without the "...than I'd planned" it gets completely ambiguous ...
2
votes
2answers
6k views

“Much more simple” or “much more simpler” [closed]

Which is the correct sentence? It is much more simple to resolve the memory leak issues. It is much more simpler to resolve the memory leak issues.
2
votes
3answers
2k views

Multivariant or Multivariate?

When testing performance or the output of different combinations of elements against one another - is it correct to say it's a "multivariant" test? Or is it a "multivariate" test?
-1
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4answers
769 views

How to say something like “A is x times as much likely …”? [duplicate]

How to accurately, unambiguously and concisely say something in the following cases: case 1. "The predictor is significant, with 1.5615 times as much likely to get higher scores when it is true." ...
5
votes
3answers
7k views

Smaller vs. less vs. lesser

I am confused as to some of the vocabulary that can be used to compare numbers and quantities, and would very much appreciate some clarification. I suppose it is safe to say that 1 is smaller than ...
4
votes
4answers
616 views

Describing event with “greatest” date value

I'm struggling with a way to describe one of a series of datetime values that has the greatest value. My first thought would be to call it the "latest", but the suggests that the event is in the ...
12
votes
1answer
525 views

“not as” versus “less”

English speakers seem to prefer "less powerful" over "not as powerful", and "not as big" over "less big". There's at least a ten-to-one ratio in both cases—See this Google Ngram. There also seems to ...
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4answers
123 views

Position of “than”

Which of the following sentence structures is correct, or sounds better? They grow at a faster rate up to three years after treatment than comparable plants. They grow at a faster rate than ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

“more” is to “less” as “er” is to what?

Excerpt from Cambridge Dictionary of American English: If you want to use an adjective or adverb to say that a quality is of a higher degree, you can usually add -er (one-syllable adjectives) to ...
3
votes
1answer
7k views

What are the comparative and superlative forms of 'lively'?

My teacher taught me that to form the comparative and superlative degrees of a mono- or di- or tri-syllabic word, I should add 'more' and 'most', e.g.: lively -more lively-most lively I know ...
4
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0answers
283 views

Etymology Moderne of … “sick”, “bad”, and words we hardly consider being the opposite any more [closed]

Somewhat prosaically, it was stated that the origin (or at least the coining practice likely used) of the word "sick" to mean "awesome", or "cool", or "astounding" ... itself used the word "cool", ...
12
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2answers
782 views

Does English have half-graded antonyms?

In a recent question about comparatives, a dispute arose in the comments about gradable antonyms like useful/useless where English speakers strongly prefer to use comparative forms only for half of ...
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3answers
2k views

“worse” vs. “less better”

What is the right way to convey the meaning that I want to say? Your job is worse than mine, so I am not going to quit my job. Is there a better choice to say this? Should I use less better than ...
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3answers
90 views

“Move slower” vs. “move less”

What is the proper word to fill the blank? The more cars there are on a given road, the __ the traffic will move. The answer is slower. But I wonder whether less is incorrect.
0
votes
1answer
941 views

“than do I” vs. “than I do” [duplicate]

I need grammatical explanations for the following two sentence structures: The mistakes children make in learning to speak tell linguists more about how children learn language than do the ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

“Less fast” vs. “less faster” [closed]

Which one is correct? He runs less fast than I. He runs less faster than I.
0
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0answers
54 views

“Taller than me” or “taller than I”? [duplicate]

Which one is correct here and why? He is taller than me. He is taller than I.
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1answer
560 views

Most is adjective or adverb, comparative or superlative in the following phrase?

In the following phrase, from the 1971 film "The Devils" by Ken Russell, what is "most"? An adjective or an adverb? And in what form, comparative or superlative? I conjure thee, most frightful ...
8
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2answers
271 views

Is 'worse' the only comparative that has neither -er nor more?

There was a question recently about comparatives and it got me thinking about how comparatives are formed. There are those that take -er and those that use more to indicate comparison, but is worse ...
5
votes
2answers
834 views

Comparative adverbs

"Officially" (or so I believe) English doesn't have comparative adverbs (a single word rather than "more" + an adverb), but faster is in common usage as one, for example: Do it faster When ...
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2answers
2k views

Usage of “no more” in a sentence

I would need help with the following sentence: It may be no more difficult to claim in words a feeling not felt than one that is. The “no more” is related to the whole sentence or just to the ...
0
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1answer
865 views

Explaining the comparative form of “numb” [closed]

The most common definition I have of numb is: "Deprived of the power of sensation." "Deprived of feeling or responsiveness." These definitions show up in nearly the same form in multiple ...
1
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2answers
32k views

much and more comparative superlative

I know that much is used with uncountable nouns and more with countable nouns. There is no connection between much and more with the comparative and superlative, right? For example, if we take the ...
0
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1answer
3k views

“more close to” [closed]

For this sentence, By allowing the customization of user interface, the user interface are more close to the need of user, since every user has different style of preferences. Is it correct to ...
3
votes
1answer
618 views

Use of comparative degree when no comparison is being done

I have studied in my academics that we can use comparative degree when comparison is being done. But today I came across use of comparative degree without any comparison. Is it correct to use ...
0
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2answers
1k views

Is the account balance “less” or “smaller” when we compare two amounts?

Your current account balance is $X smaller/less than is required I have read that when we are talking about amount we say small amount. So in my case what word would be right to use?
1
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1answer
257 views

meaning and usage of “in order the more” [closed]

I have just come across a phrase I have never seen before: I do not so in order to undermine the status of xy but, on the contrary, in order the more securely to identify certain aspects. A ...
3
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1answer
876 views

Comparative, superlative using “one of”

Which is correct: Today is one of the warmer days this month. Today is one of the warmest days this month. I hear the first used almost exclusively on television news.
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5answers
6k views

Morbid curiosity about “more better”

I have a grammatical question regarding one of the worst pieces of grammar imaginable. One of my students made the argument that better things could be considered a single item. Is it possible for the ...
1
vote
2answers
663 views

Is “faster speed”, “faster performance” correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is 'low speed' finally proving its merit? Recently in a mayor presentation of upcoming product I saw slide talking about "faster performance". Then in BBC ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

-er rather than -lier as an adverbial comparative form

In modern German, one can make tief into the comparative tiefer, regardless of whether the word is used as adjective or adverb. In English, I now have a sentence in which I want to do the same thing ...
11
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3answers
7k views

Speak Slower or Speak Slowlier?

AFAIK the correct grammar for "speak slow" is "speak slowly" (slowly being an adverb). Please correct me if I am mistaken. But in daily life I have not heard anyone saying "Speak slowlier". I think ...
4
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3answers
7k views

two times or twice

In the 1980’s the rate of increase of the minority population of the United States was nearly twice as fast as it was in the 1970’s. In the 1980’s the rate of increase of the minority population of ...
8
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5answers
1k views

Use of “The better”?

Disclamer: English isn't my first language. I learned during my English courses (a few years ago), that there is, as in French (which is my first language), a comparative and superlative version for ...