The form of an adjective or adverb used to compare two or more things. English comparatives are formed with the suffixes -er/-est or the words more/most.

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English language proper sentence [duplicate]

Which is correct of the following two sentences, one of which contains 'I', the other 'me'. That is the point of the question. In all other respects the sentences are the same. Someone bigger than ...
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1answer
361 views

Avoiding ambiguity of “more” + complex comparative

As hours flew by, we kept building more and more sophisticated fireworks than I'd planned. At best this is a garden path sentence. Without the "...than I'd planned" it gets completely ambiguous ...
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2answers
5k views

“Much more simple” or “much more simpler” [closed]

Which is the correct sentence? It is much more simple to resolve the memory leak issues. It is much more simpler to resolve the memory leak issues.
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3answers
1k views

Multivariant or Multivariate?

When testing performance or the output of different combinations of elements against one another - is it correct to say it's a "multivariant" test? Or is it a "multivariate" test?
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4answers
658 views

How to say something like “A is x times as much likely …”? [duplicate]

How to accurately, unambiguously and concisely say something in the following cases: case 1. "The predictor is significant, with 1.5615 times as much likely to get higher scores when it is true." ...
4
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2answers
5k views

Smaller vs. less vs. lesser

I am confused as to some of the vocabulary that can be used to compare numbers and quantities, and would very much appreciate some clarification. I suppose it is safe to say that 1 is smaller than ...
4
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4answers
564 views

Describing event with “greatest” date value

I'm struggling with a way to describe one of a series of datetime values that has the greatest value. My first thought would be to call it the "latest", but the suggests that the event is in the ...
12
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1answer
473 views

“not as” versus “less”

English speakers seem to prefer "less powerful" over "not as powerful", and "not as big" over "less big". There's at least a ten-to-one ratio in both cases—See this Google Ngram. There also seems to ...
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4answers
122 views

Position of “than”

Which of the following sentence structures is correct, or sounds better? They grow at a faster rate up to three years after treatment than comparable plants. They grow at a faster rate than ...
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1answer
2k views

“more” is to “less” as “er” is to what?

Excerpt from Cambridge Dictionary of American English: If you want to use an adjective or adverb to say that a quality is of a higher degree, you can usually add -er (one-syllable adjectives) to ...
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1answer
6k views

What are the comparative and superlative forms of 'lively'?

My teacher taught me that to form the comparative and superlative degrees of a mono- or di- or tri-syllabic word, I should add 'more' and 'most', e.g.: lively -more lively-most lively I know ...
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0answers
272 views

Etymology Moderne of … “sick”, “bad”, and words we hardly consider being the opposite any more [closed]

Somewhat prosaically, it was stated that the origin (or at least the coining practice likely used) of the word "sick" to mean "awesome", or "cool", or "astounding" ... itself used the word "cool", ...
12
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2answers
741 views

Does English have half-graded antonyms?

In a recent question about comparatives, a dispute arose in the comments about gradable antonyms like useful/useless where English speakers strongly prefer to use comparative forms only for half of ...
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3answers
2k views

“worse” vs. “less better”

What is the right way to convey the meaning that I want to say? Your job is worse than mine, so I am not going to quit my job. Is there a better choice to say this? Should I use less better than ...
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0answers
30 views

Which one is correct, 'I like this more' or 'I like this better'? [duplicate]

I feel that using 'I like this name more' is more correct than 'I like this name better'. Since English is not my mother tongue, I am not sure.
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3answers
86 views

“Move slower” vs. “move less”

What is the proper word to fill the blank? The more cars there are on a given road, the __ the traffic will move. The answer is slower. But I wonder whether less is incorrect.
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1answer
778 views

“than do I” vs. “than I do” [duplicate]

I need grammatical explanations for the following two sentence structures: The mistakes children make in learning to speak tell linguists more about how children learn language than do the ...
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1answer
1k views

“Less fast” vs. “less faster” [closed]

Which one is correct? He runs less fast than I. He runs less faster than I.
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53 views

“Taller than me” or “taller than I”? [duplicate]

Which one is correct here and why? He is taller than me. He is taller than I.
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1answer
522 views

Most is adjective or adverb, comparative or superlative in the following phrase?

In the following phrase, from the 1971 film "The Devils" by Ken Russell, what is "most"? An adjective or an adverb? And in what form, comparative or superlative? I conjure thee, most frightful ...
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2answers
260 views

Is 'worse' the only comparative that has neither -er nor more?

There was a question recently about comparatives and it got me thinking about how comparatives are formed. There are those that take -er and those that use more to indicate comparison, but is worse ...
5
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2answers
777 views

Comparative adverbs

"Officially" (or so I believe) English doesn't have comparative adverbs (a single word rather than "more" + an adverb), but faster is in common usage as one, for example: Do it faster When ...
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2answers
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Usage of “no more” in a sentence

I would need help with the following sentence: It may be no more difficult to claim in words a feeling not felt than one that is. The “no more” is related to the whole sentence or just to the ...
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1answer
765 views

Explaining the comparative form of “numb” [closed]

The most common definition I have of numb is: "Deprived of the power of sensation." "Deprived of feeling or responsiveness." These definitions show up in nearly the same form in multiple ...
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2answers
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much and more comparative superlative

I know that much is used with uncountable nouns and more with countable nouns. There is no connection between much and more with the comparative and superlative, right? For example, if we take the ...
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1answer
2k views

“more close to” [closed]

For this sentence, By allowing the customization of user interface, the user interface are more close to the need of user, since every user has different style of preferences. Is it correct to ...
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1answer
575 views

Use of comparative degree when no comparison is being done

I have studied in my academics that we can use comparative degree when comparison is being done. But today I came across use of comparative degree without any comparison. Is it correct to use ...
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2answers
970 views

Is the account balance “less” or “smaller” when we compare two amounts?

Your current account balance is $X smaller/less than is required I have read that when we are talking about amount we say small amount. So in my case what word would be right to use?
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1answer
219 views

meaning and usage of “in order the more” [closed]

I have just come across a phrase I have never seen before: I do not so in order to undermine the status of xy but, on the contrary, in order the more securely to identify certain aspects. A ...
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1answer
730 views

Comparative, superlative using “one of”

Which is correct: Today is one of the warmer days this month. Today is one of the warmest days this month. I hear the first used almost exclusively on television news.
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Morbid curiosity about “more better”

I have a grammatical question regarding one of the worst pieces of grammar imaginable. One of my students made the argument that better things could be considered a single item. Is it possible for the ...
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2answers
497 views

Is “faster speed”, “faster performance” correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is 'low speed' finally proving its merit? Recently in a mayor presentation of upcoming product I saw slide talking about "faster performance". Then in BBC ...
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2answers
1k views

-er rather than -lier as an adverbial comparative form

In modern German, one can make tief into the comparative tiefer, regardless of whether the word is used as adjective or adverb. In English, I now have a sentence in which I want to do the same thing ...
10
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3answers
6k views

Speak Slower or Speak Slowlier?

AFAIK the correct grammar for "speak slow" is "speak slowly" (slowly being an adverb). Please correct me if I am mistaken. But in daily life I have not heard anyone saying "Speak slowlier". I think ...
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3answers
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two times or twice

In the 1980’s the rate of increase of the minority population of the United States was nearly twice as fast as it was in the 1970’s. In the 1980’s the rate of increase of the minority population of ...
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5answers
976 views

Use of “The better”?

Disclamer: English isn't my first language. I learned during my English courses (a few years ago), that there is, as in French (which is my first language), a comparative and superlative version for ...
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1answer
741 views

Then or Than, Which to use when comparing time? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it absolutely necessary to use “than” over “then” in a comparison? Which sentence is grammatically correct? "I have been here for less ...
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1answer
199 views

Best way to represent comparative information in paragraph form?

Let's say normally I have a table, and the left hand column has a requirement in it, and the right hand column has how the requirement is fulfilled. But because of a lack of support for tables, I ...
2
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4answers
96 views

X are equivalent to Y in Z

I'm pretty new to English StackExchange, and English is not my first language, so I'm not even sure what tags to look for. So, I apologize if this has been discussed before. I'm writing up a blog and ...
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4answers
30k views

“Much more easy” versus “much easier”

My mom and I are having a dispute on much more easy versus much easier. For example, consider the sentence: It's [much more easy]/[much easier] to do action X than action Y. I say that much ...
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2answers
5k views

Usage and correctness of the term “Better than Best”

I have heard the term "Better than Best" used at few places. How is it different than saying just "best"? For example : a) He is better than the best. b) He is the best. 1) How are (a) and (b) ...
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3answers
688 views

How do you say “more to the east”? Easter, Easterer, Easterner, Easternerer?

One can sure write “east to you” or “more to the east”, but if I'm located in London and you're in Berlin, can I say that you're “easter” than me?
2
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2answers
716 views

Can any adjective be used as comparative?

I was talking with my friends the other day about what is heathy to eat, I brought up the fact that something can be healthy if you compare it to something that is not healthy. You could say a ...
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4answers
7k views

“More than (what) meets the eye”

Is it correct to say more than what meets the eye? More than meets the eye sounds incorrect, but I've seen a lot of people use it and that confuses me. What acts like an object to the phrase which ...
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3answers
618 views

Is it incorrect to use non-comparative adjectives while comparing two things?

Is it required to use comparative adjectives while comparing two things like this? Wireless networks, compared to wired networks, suffer from slow(er) connection speed, long(er) delay, and (more) ...
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4answers
2k views

“Younger” or “youngest”

I came across an odd-looking usage in the paper today... The wife of President Assad listens to her husband yesterday with her two younger children The sentence suggests that she has some other ...
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2answers
2k views

Is there a comparative form of the word “different?” [closed]

Does the adjective "different" have a comparative form? If so what is it?
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3answers
1k views

comparative construction used with pronouns, especially 'her'

I was recently pulled up by a colleague when I made a statement along the lines of I am a better player than her. My colleague suggested the correct statement should be better player than she is ...
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2answers
822 views

Justification of “more perfect” [closed]

I've just read this interesting article. We were being constantly told back in school years that we couldn't use "more" to modify "perfect". I kept feeling guilty using "more perfect" until I read ...
5
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0answers
190 views

“Prefer tea to/over coffee” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct: “prefer X to Y” or “prefer X over Y”? Which is correct? I prefer tea to coffee. I prefer tea over coffee.