4
votes
3answers
148 views

Comparative or superlative to describe a quality of a member of a set of two things?

For example, 'he's the bigger of the two guards' or 'he's the biggest of the two guards'? The comparative indicates that something is bigger/more difficult than another member. If there's only two ...
2
votes
0answers
34 views

“I've got more to do than wait” or “I've got more to do than **to** wait”? [duplicate]

I did some reading in other places online about using the bare infinitive after the word "than," and while in a lot of cases it seems correct, I'm having a hard time telling whether it's correct in ...
-1
votes
4answers
317 views

How to say something like “A is x times as much likely …”? [duplicate]

How to accurately, unambiguously and concisely say something in the following cases: case 1. "The predictor is significant, with 1.5615 times as much likely to get higher scores when it is true." ...
-2
votes
4answers
4k views

“More than (what) meets the eye”

Is it correct to say more than what meets the eye? More than meets the eye sounds incorrect, but I've seen a lot of people use it and that confuses me. What acts like an object to the phrase which ...
1
vote
2answers
560 views

Do I need to use comparative degree?

Maybe it's a little long story. Maybe it's a little longer story.
6
votes
6answers
3k views

Use of the superlative when only two items are present

When speaking with my mother a couple of days ago, I read to her a message I was sending to my cousin on her behalf ending with: "... the birthday of your youngest." [implying her child] She ...