1
vote
2answers
73 views

“Poorer” vs. “more poor”

As a non-native speaker I am curious about the everyday usage of more poor in contrast to poorer. The dictionary dictates poorer as the correct form, with some allowing both forms. According to ...
-1
votes
2answers
43 views

Which is correct: “A is higher as compared that” OR “A is high as compared to”?

The weight of A is higher as compared that of its counterparts. The weight of A is high as compared to that of its counterparts. Which word is more suitable —'high' or 'higher'?
2
votes
1answer
56 views

When to use more or -er [duplicate]

Is there a rule as to when I use "more" in a sentence or "-er"? For example, "I think it would be more fun/funner if we stayed home tonight." I know the correct usage in this sentence but is there a ...
0
votes
2answers
134 views

Less-experienced vs less experienced employee

As an Android developer with 3 years of experience, I also help less experienced team members. Do I need to put a hyphen between "less" and "experienced"?
2
votes
2answers
170 views

What is wrong with mixing “taller” and “tallest” like this?

Although the towers appear identical, the west tower is the tallest, standing 16 feet taller than the east tower. What might be wrong? Does it have to do with comparative and superlative degrees? ...
-1
votes
1answer
158 views

Comparative adjectives cannot have -er ending

Questions on the use of lesser have appeared on here before, but I was reading a book on grammar which states the following (I omitted parts to keep it brief, but I retained what I think are the ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

“More drunk” or “drunker”?

I am at a party. I drink wine till I'm drunk. Then I drink some more. So am I more drunk now, or drunker?
4
votes
3answers
417 views

Comparative or superlative to describe a quality of a member of a set of two things?

For example, 'he's the bigger of the two guards' or 'he's the biggest of the two guards'? The comparative indicates that something is bigger/more difficult than another member. If there's only two ...
-1
votes
1answer
235 views

“Too low for the price” or “too less for the price” [closed]

Too low for the price Too less for the price Please suggest which one is correct grammatically. Scenarios: The cost for 15 minute show was Rupees 50. It is too low for the price. I ...
0
votes
1answer
425 views

Lesser number vs. smaller number [duplicate]

I am wondering about the correct use of lesser/smaller in the following phrase: This library has a smaller/lesser number of books than the National Library. I did find another thread on nearly ...
7
votes
3answers
9k views

Conundrum: “cleverer” or “more clever”, “simpler” or “more simple” etc

I know the rule for making the comparative and superlative form for two-syllable words ending in y, replace the -y with i and use -er and -est : hap.py → happier → (the) happiest ti.dy → tidier → ...
3
votes
3answers
5k views

Should I write: “areas becoming denser” or “more dense”?

I am trying to describe how cities have been affected by the growing population in terms of the density of bodies. This is how I have it at the moment but I am unsure whether it should be "more ...
0
votes
1answer
184 views

Avoiding ambiguity of “more” + complex comparative

As hours flew by, we kept building more and more sophisticated fireworks than I'd planned. At best this is a garden path sentence. Without the "...than I'd planned" it gets completely ambiguous ...
2
votes
3answers
838 views

Multivariant or Multivariate?

When testing performance or the output of different combinations of elements against one another - is it correct to say it's a "multivariant" test? Or is it a "multivariate" test?
4
votes
2answers
3k views

Smaller vs. less vs. lesser

I am confused as to some of the vocabulary that can be used to compare numbers and quantities, and would very much appreciate some clarification. I suppose it is safe to say that 1 is smaller than ...
10
votes
1answer
362 views

“not as” versus “less”

English speakers seem to prefer "less powerful" over "not as powerful", and "not as big" over "less big". There's at least a ten-to-one ratio in both cases—See this Google Ngram. There also seems to ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

“more” is to “less” as “er” is to what?

Excerpt from Cambridge Dictionary of American English: If you want to use an adjective or adverb to say that a quality is of a higher degree, you can usually add -er (one-syllable adjectives) to ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

What are the comparative and superlative forms of 'lively'?

My teacher taught me that to form the comparative and superlative degrees of a mono- or di- or tri-syllabic word, I should add 'more' and 'most', e.g.: lively -more lively-most lively I know ...
4
votes
0answers
227 views

Etymology Moderne of … “sick”, “bad”, and words we hardly consider being the opposite any more [closed]

Somewhat prosaically, it was stated that the origin (or at least the coining practice likely used) of the word "sick" to mean "awesome", or "cool", or "astounding" ... itself used the word "cool", ...
-2
votes
1answer
450 views

Most is adjective or adverb, comparative or superlative in the following phrase?

In the following phrase, from the 1971 film "The Devils" by Ken Russell, what is "most"? An adjective or an adverb? And in what form, comparative or superlative? I conjure thee, most frightful ...
-1
votes
2answers
864 views

Usage of “no more” in a sentence

I would need help with the following sentence: It may be no more difficult to claim in words a feeling not felt than one that is. The “no more” is related to the whole sentence or just to the ...
3
votes
1answer
500 views

Use of comparative degree when no comparison is being done

I have studied in my academics that we can use comparative degree when comparison is being done. But today I came across use of comparative degree without any comparison. Is it correct to use ...
11
votes
5answers
4k views

Morbid curiosity about “more better”

I have a grammatical question regarding one of the worst pieces of grammar imaginable. One of my students made the argument that better things could be considered a single item. Is it possible for the ...
0
votes
2answers
294 views

Is “faster speed”, “faster performance” correct? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is 'low speed' finally proving its merit? Recently in a mayor presentation of upcoming product I saw slide talking about "faster performance". Then in BBC ...
8
votes
5answers
815 views

Use of “The better”?

Disclamer: English isn't my first language. I learned during my English courses (a few years ago), that there is, as in French (which is my first language), a comparative and superlative version for ...
2
votes
2answers
613 views

Can any adjective be used as comparative?

I was talking with my friends the other day about what is heathy to eat, I brought up the fact that something can be healthy if you compare it to something that is not healthy. You could say a ...
5
votes
3answers
522 views

Is it incorrect to use non-comparative adjectives while comparing two things?

Is it required to use comparative adjectives while comparing two things like this? Wireless networks, compared to wired networks, suffer from slow(er) connection speed, long(er) delay, and (more) ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

“Younger” or “youngest”

I came across an odd-looking usage in the paper today... The wife of President Assad listens to her husband yesterday with her two younger children The sentence suggests that she has some other ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Is there a comparative form of the word “different?” [closed]

Does the adjective "different" have a comparative form? If so what is it?
6
votes
5answers
1k views

The comparative of “environmentally friendly”

When using the comparative with environmentally friendly would it be correct to say environmentally friendlier, or more environmentally friendly?
20
votes
7answers
2k views

Why “Greater Toronto” rather than “Great Toronto”

Many big cities have their names preceded by Greater. Why not just Great? Does Greater indicate that the city is ambitious to expand itself? Why is Greater not used for country names such as Great ...
7
votes
3answers
2k views

Increasingly + positive or increasingly + comparative?

For instance, would you rather say "It became increasingly hard" or "It became increasingly harder"? From my understanding, both are possible, but their meaning is slightly different. The first ...
18
votes
6answers
2k views

Are the rules regarding absolute modifiers too absolute?

A common grammar lesson that was taught to me in the US and that I've had to teach abroad in EFL classrooms is that we're not to use adverbs of emphasis with absolute modifiers, just as we're not ...
2
votes
1answer
163 views

“Are you happier?”

I was reading an English book. This is a snippet of a conversation below: But please tell us... do you like your job? Are you happier? I am confused at happier. Why not use happy?
14
votes
12answers
12k views

What is the difference between “quicker” and “faster”?

What is the correct word to use here and why: I will get there quicker [than you] vs. I will get there faster [than you] There must be similar adverbs for "slower".
7
votes
4answers
6k views

“Lower number” vs. “smaller number”

Is −9 a smaller number than −8? And is −9 a lower number than −8? What is the difference between lower and smaller here?
0
votes
1answer
4k views

What's the comparative for the word “modern”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “More clear” vs “Clearer”, when to use “more” instead of “-er” What's the comparative for the word modern?
3
votes
2answers
649 views

Multiple comparatives of different types: how to choose?

I have an eight-month-old daughter. Her experiments in mobility led me to contemplate phrases like the dirtier and messier, the better. What happens if one (but not both) of the adjectives ...
3
votes
3answers
133 views

Is “more mainstream” a valid thing to write?

I'm writing a report talking about how a certain technique in my field has become 'more mainstream', but that phrase looks rather wrong. Is it a valid thing to say? Can something become "more ...
2
votes
3answers
11k views

What is the correct usage of 'worse' and 'worst'?

I've noticed a lot of people who, according to the way I was taught, misuse the words 'worse' and 'worst'. The way I understand it, 'worse' is for comparisons, and 'worst' is the superlative. But more ...
5
votes
4answers
2k views

Is 'uniquer' a word?

My spellcheck doesn't complain about 'uniquer'. Is it a valid word? Since unique means "one of a kind", 'uniquer' has no valid definition, but that doesn't prevent it from being a valid dictionary ...
3
votes
2answers
606 views

An adjective to describe a substance consisting of smaller-size grains

What adjective you would use to describe a substance consisting of grains of smaller size compared to those of another substance? For example, "Milk powder is ______er than sugar". Addition: And if ...
6
votes
5answers
2k views

Is “such a cooler” proper English?

I'm trying to say something like "that's such a cooler design". Is there more valid expression that expresses the same thing? Or is this okay English? I guess "that design is so much cooler" would ...
42
votes
5answers
166k views

“More clear” vs “Clearer”: when to use “more” instead of “-er”?

Which one of these adjectives is correct? I can see that both of them are being used, I'm just not sure which one is grammatically correct. Are there any general rules to follow as to the use of one ...