The form of an adjective or adverb used to compare two or more things. English comparatives are formed with the suffixes -er/-est or the words more/most.

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Is there a linguistic term the type of solecism of using “more X” when “Xer” is the established comparative?

So I posted a joke on Facebook, and one of the peanut gallery chimed in that where I'd used vaster, he would have preferred more vast. Leaving aside the question of whether vaster itself is ...
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4answers
107 views

“It is better to X than to Y” - the structure of a difficult comparative sentence

Take the following sentence: It is better to underestimate your abilities and overestimate your risks than to go in a direction that actually involves more uncertainty than you can justify. For ...
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4answers
101 views

more unhealthy vs. unhealthier

First off, I'm not a native speaker but this question isn't about the rules themselves but rather usage in the USA. I learnt that you should say 'unhealthier' (and the Oxford + Longman dictionaries I ...
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1answer
37 views

Use of the adjective “young” in the comparative form

Is correct to use the adjective "young" for objects? For example, in a sentence like this: "This painting is younger than that one.", I think it would be better to use "new" for "painting", but then, ...
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27 views

Can I use a comparative adjective as a noun?

Can I use a comparative adjective as a noun, as in the following sentence: "The older told him to stop." Or do I have to use "one", as in: "The older one told him to stop." Thanks in advance!
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58 views

“It's as same watch as the one I lost.” - What is wrong with the sentence?

Are the following sentences grammatically correct? If not, what's wrong with them? It's as same watch as the one I lost. It's the same watch as I lost.
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1answer
52 views

“How much is faster the train than the car?” [closed]

How much is faster the train than the car? How much is the train faster than the car? Which one is correct?
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2answers
85 views

Comparative form of shy [duplicate]

I've been looking for this answer a lot and people say diferent things are true. Is it shyer and the shyest, shier and shiest or more shy and the most shy? According to Merriam-Webster dictionary it's ...
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1answer
49 views

Can ungradable adjectives be used as gradable?

I was under the impression that ungradable adjectives cannot have comparative forms in any circumstances, because there are no degrees in those adjectives. But I found a quotation from George Orwell ...
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2answers
66 views

What is the base form called of a superlative or comparative adjective? [duplicate]

Motivation: I'm doing a text-mining project and I'd like to map all forms of an adjective to their "base-form". Example: bigger -> big biggest -> big stronger -> strong strongest ...
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2answers
240 views

“I have more bikes and cars than him” [closed]

I have more bikes and cars than him. Gotham has more traffic lights and large roads than Paris. Are these right or wrong? Note: I didn't compare the size of their roads. I compared the ...
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1answer
87 views

a shorter time/less time

This takes less time than that. This takes a shorter time than that. Why is 'a' necessary is the second and not the first example?
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the duplicated expression “over more than”

There are over more than 3,000 people in the stadium. What do you think about this duplicated expression "over more than"? Does the redundant wording serve to intensify? Or is it wrong?
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1answer
109 views

How can you describe “percentage” in a sentence?

I need to compare two system and explain that one is faster than the other specifying the percentage, so is the following correct? in fact new system computes the whole dataset the 10% percent ...
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1answer
64 views

“Human feelings are quite complex than of animals” - What should I put after “than”?

I want to write something meaning "humans have more complicated feelings than animals have." I wrote the following but I am not sure if "of" is the correct choice or not. Nevertheless, human ...
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1answer
92 views

Thoughts on today's article on “farther” vs “further”?

See the article for context. Seems like a plausible suggestion to me, but I'm curious what others think. Consider the house, tree, and sunflower in the illustration at the top of this post. The ...
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1answer
60 views

Comparative words after the subject

I'm really having trouble figuring out how to describe a clause describing a subject which contains a comparative adjective (or an adjective of equality). For example: Children [shorter than four ...
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2answers
128 views

“I am extremely smarter than you.”

Is "I am extremely smarter than you." a grammatically OK sentence? It sounds awkward, but is there a grammatical issue? Please note that I am not asking if it could sound better, nor am I asking for ...
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0answers
25 views

comparatives - “easier” or “more easy”, “friendlier” or “more friendly” [duplicate]

Yes, this is a question that people keep repeating about comparatives, especially with these adjectives: easy, pretty, friendly, lively. I know the rule about two-syllable adjectives ending in /i/ ...
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1answer
130 views

Comparative adjectives

I have a question concerning use of more in comparative sentences when used with adjectives. I was more furious about my cat's death than you thought I would be. Usually, or always, when more ...
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1answer
4k views

Is “I am more than happy to help you” grammatically correct?

Ok, I often hear my American teacher says "I am more than happy to help you". I am not sure it is grammatically correct. Ok, there is no problem to say "I am happy to help you" or "I am very happy ...
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1answer
114 views

Is there a word for “conjugating” an adjective?

Verbs can be conjugated to past/future tenses. Nouns can be pluralized. Adjectives also have comparative and superlative forms. For example fast, faster, and fastest. What is the word that describes ...
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1answer
54 views

Help explain what “miseries were as vast as the sky” mean [closed]

I'm totally confused about the use of this phrase in this situation: After Margaret Sanger saw the worst of many women who had to do abortion with abortionists, they suffered from physical pains ...
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1answer
47 views

comparative/superlative usage

Here's the question my little bro asked me the other day. The price of the vest is _ than the dress or the jacket. A.lower B.the higher C.more expensive D.cheaper To me, ACD seems to all fit but B.
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2answers
71 views

Is there an adjective equivalent for “more succinct”?

Generally speaking, I want to say that x is equivalent to y but one is more succinct than the other, in a single word if possible (because ironically "more succinct" is not very succinct). E.g: 4 is ...
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75 views

Comparative… Marginally, Substantially and Exceedingly above average

Is my understanding of the use of "Marginally", "Substantially" and "Exceedingly" correct as per the depiction below?
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229 views

Can I use “more younger” in a sentence? [closed]

For example: Who looks more younger in this image, me or you?
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750 views

Much more better

Is it correct to say " much more better "? You know the -er ending in better means more already so it seems redundant , "Like saying something twice" Although I heard it frequently I was wondering if ...
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1answer
38 views

comparative correlative with 3 parts

Is it possible to construct a comparative correlative sentence with 3 parts? e.g., The more he walks, the less energy he has, the more tired he gets. or must it be split into 2 parts, e.g., ...
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431 views

Can we use “elder to” as a comparative adjective?

As I understand, in comparative form of Adjectives, elder is used of persons, and older is used of both persons or things. One other feature of elder is that it is not used with than. However, it is ...
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3answers
51 views

The rhetorical effect of “no more … than” construction

The following is a part of the section 15.70 of A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language (Longman). Rachel is no more courageous than Saul(is). The sentence implies that both ...
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5answers
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the idiomatic use of “no more than” and “no less than”

I have questions about the use of no more than and no less than . The following is the item 14. phrase of the word more from COBUILD online dictionary. You use no more than or not more than when ...
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1answer
81 views

Correct structure of a comparative-type sentence with dependent clauses

The original sentence says: "The greater the amount of total suspended solids the higher the turbidity of the water." I think it feels off because it lacks a verb. Would the following be an ...
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84 views

the meaning of “they should not look nearly as different as they do”

The three species (Man, the chimpanzee and the gorilla) share almost 99 percent of their DNA, and on that basis, surely, they should not look nearly as different as they do. Am I right in ...
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How can something be “fuller” or the “fullest”?

Consider the definition for full (Source): full [foo l] adjective, fuller, fullest. completely filled; containing all that can be held; filled to utmost capacity: a full cup. ...
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4answers
168 views

Can something be “blacker” than something else? How common are single-word comparatives and superlatives for color-designating adjectives?

Merriam-Webster implies that the comparative and superlative for black are blacker and blackest. However, my native British colleague says he would never used blacker, only more black. How common is ...
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1answer
269 views

No higher than vs not higher than [closed]

I came across this weird uncommon usage in a documentation page. Can anyone help me understand the meaning/stipulation here? It says "value x can be no higher than "some value" Does it mean that "x" ...
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Tests have shown that the quality of locally produced cars is somewhat higher than imported vehicles

I know that "higher than that of imported" would be better, but how wrong is it as it is? Tests have shown that the quality of locally produced cars is somewhat higher than imported vehicles.
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73 views

How to refer something you said before in order to make a comparison?

I want to say this I have always been amazed by "something". Being a part of it is as amazing as that "something". However I want to say it in a shorter way without saying "something". Let me try I ...
3
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1answer
86 views

What is the term for comparatives that cannot be formed with -er and -est?

Is there a term to describe the case where using "-er" and "-est" is incorrect to form a comparative because it is formed by using "more" or "most"? For example: more difficult instead of ...
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1answer
1k views

Is “preciser” a valid comparative of “precise”?

I encountered preciser as a comparative of precise and thought it was incorrect. However, some reputable online dictionaries (1, 2) return hits for "preciser". But they do not explicitly list the ...
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56 views

Tallest vs Loftiest [closed]

How is the usage of the two words different? I think they mean one and the same. Are they?
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1k views

Negative Comparatives & Superlatives

An Adjective can, in general, be converted to Comparative (-er) & Superlative (-est) ; for example : good better best happy happier happiest Now Superlative means "Highest in quality", ...
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1answer
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Can I say “more funny” or “most funny” instead of “funnier” or “funniest”?

Could you please provide a reference to your answer whatever it is? I know that "funnier" and "funniest" are more correct, but I want to know whether the less common versions are considered errors or ...
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3answers
2k views

Too less vs too little [closed]

Consider these two sentences: One week is too little to observe a measurable weight loss. One week is too less to observe a measurable weight loss. When I uttered (2) in casual speech, my ...
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2answers
3k views

as best I can vs as well as I can [duplicate]

I have to say I have an issue with the phrase "as best I can". After all, "best" is the superlative form of "well" and does not belong in the comparative construction "as... as" - not to mention that ...
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2answers
188 views

“how quicker” vs. “how much quicker”

I'm trying to settle a debate with my girlfriend. She says "how quicker" is incorrect and you should always use "how much quicker". Which of these is [more?] correct? See how quicker the cars ...
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Does “is potentially faster” imply “is not slower”?

Someone said to me, "X is potentially faster than Y". Without any clarification at that point, I immediately assumed that the speaker thought that X was at least not slower than Y. It was revealed in ...
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2answers
138 views

What is the difference between “at least as surprising as” and “more surprising than”?

According to Wikipedia, P value is defined as the probability that data at least as surprising as the observed sample results would be generated under a model of random chance Why is it stated ...
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183 views

“Twice (adj.)-er” vs. “two times (adj.)-er” vs. “twice/two times as (adj.) as”

Suppose we are comparing a particular characteristic (that takes comparative -er) of two items, A and B. Compared to B, A displays double that characteristic. There are multiple ways we can express ...