The form of an adjective or adverb used to compare two or more things. English comparatives are formed with the suffixes -er/-est or the words more/most.

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Tests have shown that the quality of locally produced cars is somewhat higher than imported vehicles

I know that "higher than that of imported" would be better, but how wrong is it as it is? Tests have shown that the quality of locally produced cars is somewhat higher than imported vehicles.
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14 views

How to refer something you said before in order to make a comparison?

I want to say this I have always been amazed by "something". Being a part of it is as amazing as that "something". However I want to say it in a shorter way without saying "something". Let me try I ...
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62 views

What is the term for comparatives that cannot be formed with -er and -est?

Is there a term to describe the case where using "-er" and "-est" is incorrect to form a comparative because it is formed by using "more" or "most"? For example: more difficult instead of ...
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46 views

Is “preciser” a valid comparative of “precise”?

I encountered preciser as a comparative of precise and thought it was incorrect. However, some reputable online dictionaries (1, 2) return hits for "preciser". But they do not explicitly list the ...
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2answers
49 views

Tallest vs Loftiest [closed]

How is the usage of the two words different? I think they mean one and the same. Are they?
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2answers
191 views

Negative Comparatives & Superlatives

An Adjective can, in general, be converted to Comparative (-er) & Superlative (-est) ; for example : good better best happy happier happiest Now Superlative means "Highest in quality", ...
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481 views

Can I say “more funny” or “most funny” instead of “funnier” or “funniest”?

Could you please provide a reference to your answer whatever it is? I know that "funnier" and "funniest" are more correct, but I want to know whether the less common versions are considered errors or ...
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3answers
270 views

Too less vs too little [closed]

Consider these two sentences: One week is too little to observe a measurable weight loss. One week is too less to observe a measurable weight loss. When I uttered (2) in casual speech, my ...
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2answers
360 views

as best I can vs as well as I can [duplicate]

I have to say I have an issue with the phrase "as best I can". After all, "best" is the superlative form of "well" and does not belong in the comparative construction "as... as" - not to mention that ...
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2answers
116 views

“how quicker” vs. “how much quicker”

I'm trying to settle a debate with my girlfriend. She says "how quicker" is incorrect and you should always use "how much quicker". Which of these is [more?] correct? See how quicker the cars ...
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9answers
3k views

Does “is potentially faster” imply “is not slower”?

Someone said to me, "X is potentially faster than Y". Without any clarification at that point, I immediately assumed that the speaker thought that X was at least not slower than Y. It was revealed in ...
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2answers
83 views

What is the difference between “at least as surprising as” and “more surprising than”?

According to Wikipedia, P value is defined as "the probability that data at least as surprising as the observed sample results would be generated under a model of random chance" Why is it stated ...
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1answer
79 views

“Twice (adj.)-er” vs. “two times (adj.)-er” vs. “twice/two times as (adj.) as”

Suppose we are comparing a particular characteristic (that takes comparative -er) of two items, A and B. Compared to B, A displays double that characteristic. There are multiple ways we can express ...
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1answer
68 views

Proper way to say “more and bigger”

I want to communicate (in written language) that "there are more pictures and bigger pictures if you click the link", without writing "pictures" twice and sounding silly. Is the construction "more ...
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2answers
76 views

What is the proper construction of this comparative?

This sentence appeared in a recent New Yorker article written by the copy chief there: I find it easier to use the serial comma consistently rather than stop every time I come to a series and ...
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2answers
131 views

Double Comparatives

I'm learning English comparatives of Adjectives and Adverbs. I have 2 questions relating to "double comparatives" Firstly, should I use: (1) The better you are at English, the more chances you ...
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103 views

Usage of comparative with a set of adjectives

Today I heard in a video a phrase that puzzled me a bit, specifically "...a more just and fair system..." My previous understanding is that it should had been "fairer and juster" but now I have ...
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3answers
169 views

Are there cases where it is correct to use “more” with a monosyllabic adjective?

In general, it appears monosyllabic adjectives in English form the comparative by the -er suffix. Are there any cases where a monosyllabic adjective can be preceded by more but still be grammatical ...
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1answer
59 views

Can 'more + [adjective] + [plural noun]' be ambiguous sometimes?

The government would have to take more fundamental steps to address the minority's disquiet. Is this sentence ambiguous? May the implied meanings include: The government should increase the ...
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2answers
6k views

“Poorer” vs. “more poor”

As a non-native speaker I am curious about the everyday usage of more poor in contrast to poorer. The dictionary dictates poorer as the correct form, with some allowing both forms. According to ...
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2answers
271 views

Which is correct: “A is higher as compared that” OR “A is high as compared to”?

The weight of A is higher as compared that of its counterparts. The weight of A is high as compared to that of its counterparts. Which word is more suitable —'high' or 'higher'?
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1answer
112 views

“Major”, “Minor”: Any words for gauging more importance or less? [closed]

I am writing a list of descriptions of how much or how little importance is attached to an issue under discussion or to a product feature under consideration. I would like to have three or four ...
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1answer
78 views

“largest of any mammal” vs. “largest of all mammals”

A: This animal is the largest of any mammal. vs. B: This animal is the largest of all mammals. What are the subtle differences between A and B?
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2answers
229 views

I will learn better English — should it be “I will learn English better.”

Somehow, I think "better English" is incorrect, because I think there isn't better English; English is English. But I hear this phrase from other ESL students a lot. Is this correct way of saying it? ...
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158 views

Is “no other” + comparative grammatically correct?

There is no other harsher critic than yourself. I'm really stumped on this one. The more I read it the less correct it sounds. I think the word harsher is making the sentence sound fairly off ...
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1answer
2k views

When to use more or -er [duplicate]

Is there a rule as to when I use "more" in a sentence or "-er"? For example, "I think it would be more fun/funner if we stayed home tonight." I know the correct usage in this sentence but is there a ...
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3answers
5k views

What’s the opposite of “wider”? [closed]

What is the opposite of wide and wider? For instance, is the corresponding opposite to sentence one below really sentence two? The Ipad2 is wider than the iPad Air. The iPad Air is narrower than ...
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3answers
8k views

Comparative and Superlative for little?

What is the comparative and superlative for little?
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529 views

Why is my English “worlds better” than yours but never “the best by worlds”?

In speech when making comparisons we can say: It is far better than It's way better than It's miles better than It's worlds better than For instance, British restaurant food is ...
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2answers
482 views

Less-experienced vs less experienced employee

As an Android developer with 3 years of experience, I also help less experienced team members. Do I need to put a hyphen between "less" and "experienced"?
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2answers
153 views

Illogical comparative

I have a little problem of understanding how to pick the preposition of "at" ,"of" or "in" in Illogical comparative : e.g. The climate in the north is colder than that of the south. Why do we us ...
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38 views

Would it be possible to note similarities with in comparison with?

In comparison with is used to show contrasting ideas. I wonder whether this phrase could be used to note similarities as well, especially with words like: similar, the same, alike. Would you, for ...
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2answers
1k views

What is wrong with mixing “taller” and “tallest” like this?

Although the towers appear identical, the west tower is the tallest, standing 16 feet taller than the east tower. What might be wrong? Does it have to do with comparative and superlative degrees? ...
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404 views

Comparative adjectives cannot have -er ending

Questions on the use of lesser have appeared on here before, but I was reading a book on grammar which states the following (I omitted parts to keep it brief, but I retained what I think are the ...
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2k views

Wording: closest date vs nearest date?

Which sounds more natural? The closest date is ... or The nearest date is ... Context: It is a variable name in a software application I rewrite, which - in short - expresses the most ...
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2answers
2k views

Is “oftener” obsolete?

Does any native speaker of the English Language ever use oftener instead of more often?
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7k views

“More drunk” or “drunker”?

I am at a party. I drink wine till I'm drunk. Then I drink some more. So am I more drunk now, or drunker?
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2answers
103 views

“Greater Good”: Why the comparative?

I’ve often heard the expression Greater Good and have always come across the very same question about it: why the comparative form instead of the superlative form?
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16answers
15k views

A word that means 'most important'?

I tried to find a single word that means "most important", but I couldn't. I want it to be able to express what's missing below: If you get hurt, the _ thing to do is to stay calm. It would ...
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3answers
764 views

Comparative or superlative to describe a quality of a member of a set of two things?

For example, 'he's the bigger of the two guards' or 'he's the biggest of the two guards'? The comparative indicates that something is bigger/more difficult than another member. If there's only two ...
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81 views

what the logical/physical pair means?

In English, we often use logical/physical pair to describe something, like in powerdesigner, there are two type of data models: logical data model and physical data model what's this words ...
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3answers
615 views

Is there a difference between “less ambiguous” and “more unambiguous”?

Relevant examples: If you make the following changes your sentence will be less ambiguous. If you make the following changes your sentence will be more unambiguous. Do these sentences have ...
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1answer
67 views

“To hear” or “hearing” [duplicate]

Nothing is so happy as to hear from your family. Nothing is so happy as hearing from your family. Which is more natural for native speakers?
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35 views

“I've got more to do than wait” or “I've got more to do than **to** wait”? [duplicate]

I did some reading in other places online about using the bare infinitive after the word "than," and while in a lot of cases it seems correct, I'm having a hard time telling whether it's correct in ...
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2answers
86 views

Phrases to describe different conditions

For example, I measure test scores for different groups of students. When I present the results, should I say: Here are test scores with respect to different student groups. Or: Here are ...
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50 views

That of Tokyo vs. one of Tokyo?

The climate of Sapporo is colder than one of Tokyo. The climate of Sapporo is colder than that of Tokyo. Which is correct?
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6answers
2k views

In mathematics, when referring to pure numbers is largest or biggest correct?

When referring to a list of number is largest or biggest correct? For example, I want to find the biggest number in an array. Or should it be the largest number. Finally, would either biggest or ...
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1answer
138 views

Archaic gradation words/constructs synonymous to “more” and “less”?

Are there any adverbs/pronouns (or sentence constructs) that fulfilled the gradation role of more and less in Early Modern English, that currently fell out of use or exist only in marginal, archaic or ...
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1answer
385 views

“Too low for the price” or “too less for the price” [closed]

Too low for the price Too less for the price Please suggest which one is correct grammatically. Scenarios: The cost for 15 minute show was Rupees 50. It is too low for the price. I ...
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1answer
2k views

Lesser number vs. smaller number [duplicate]

I am wondering about the correct use of lesser/smaller in the following phrase: This library has a smaller/lesser number of books than the National Library. I did find another thread on nearly ...