Collocation refers to the appearance or occurrence of groups or pairs of words, particularly when more frequent than random chance would suggest.

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2answers
133 views

“Intense stress” vs. “high stress” [on hold]

Capable of performing under intense stress without compromising quality of service. Capable of performing under high stress without compromising quality of service. Which is best suited ...
0
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0answers
49 views

Is “dissecting the anatomy of x” a correct expression? [closed]

I wonder whether one can dissect anatomy, or if dissection is something you say of anatomy, or something like that.
0
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2answers
57 views

collocation with over, down, out [duplicate]

I'm completely confused when it comes to the combinations with over | down | out: Thank you for coming over | Thank you for coming down | Thank you for coming out. Come over here | Come ...
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6answers
82 views

What is the verb used with 'repentance' when the subject is God responding to someones repentance?

A person repents to God. Then God responds to their prayer and (v) their repentance. What verb goes here? What is the correct collocation? The only examples I can find on the internet are : 'I was ...
5
votes
2answers
91 views

“Please be considerate of…” vs. “please be considerate to…”

We have a sign on a door at work which slams when people aren't careful. It originally read: Please be considerate of those here and close this door quietly. Someone crossed out the of and ...
13
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5answers
129k views

What is the difference between “sardonic” and “sarcastic”?

Basically, sardonic and sarcastic both stand for mocking gestures, but what is the difference in their contextual use? Are there any other words that represent a similar gesture?
3
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3answers
82 views

“Attendant with” vs. “attendant to” vs. “attendant of”

Can the adjective attendant be used with the prepositions with, to, or of, and, if so, which is preferable? For example, I could say, "This manual describes the operation of the product and its ...
0
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1answer
78 views

Qualifying a profile

Which of these adjectives is better used to qualify a profile (the width of an elongated object, such as in crossing profile)? low or small large or high Low crossing profile seems more common ...
1
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1answer
71 views

“it took quite a lot of courage to..” What is the collocation?

I need some help! I've found this sentence in my CAE book. There was a word missing, I wrote "took". My answer was correct. In my opinion John needed a lot of courage to sing that time. However, the ...
0
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1answer
63 views

“Habitat selection in/of birds”, “concept in/of statistics”, “theme in/of evolution”

It seems to me that in and of work equally well in sentences such as these: Habitat selection in birds is frequently studied. Habitat selection of birds is frequently studied. ...
0
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2answers
59 views

What's the difference between 'there are two parts of it' and 'there are two parts to it'?

My student asked me the above question and I'm not quite sure what the correct answer is. Any advice would be hugely appreciated.
6
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12answers
1k views

What vivid verb should I use when someone “turns into” a zombie?

In conversation, when someone says they appreciate my brain, I need an effective comeback. I was going to say: "I hope that you are not turning into a zombie with your love for my brain." But I ...
0
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3answers
145 views

Connotation of the phrase “bidding big”

Is it correct to say that a bid is "big"? What connotations does the phrase bidding big come to the average native speaker's mind? Is the phrase, "bidding big" positive or negative? Is it daring or ...
0
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2answers
80 views

Irradiate, illuminate and shine to mean “throw light”

All the three words are used to mean "throw light" in a document explaining principles of a barcode reader which I am checking. They are all used in sentences to explain "Throw LED to barcode". I ...
4
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3answers
2k views

Is “with respect to” wrong?

My English professor suggested yesterday that the expression "with respect to", despite being frequently used is simply wrong. He said that one should rather use "in respect of", which in turn is not ...
1
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1answer
159 views

What is the most common collocation to describe the seven trumpets blown in Revelation?

Revelation 8:1-2 (of the Bible) says the following (KJV): And when he had opened the seventh seal, there was silence in heaven about the space of half an hour. And I saw the seven angels which ...
0
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0answers
23 views

Is a value something to “indicate” the valued thing?

Sorry for the confusing title. I came across the below sentence, and am wondering if the word "indicate" collocates with the word "value" as in this case: The PCS (Print Contrast Signal) is a ...
1
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1answer
115 views

“In my career as” — is “as” correct here?

I have this fragment: ... the experience and knowledge gained will be helpful in my career as a neuropathologist. Is the "as" here okay? It somehow does not sound right to me. Obviously I want ...
0
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4answers
316 views

If I can “fall in” love, can I “fall in” depression?

In Italian we say essere innamorato (to be in love) whereas the English idiom, to fall in love, expresses the idea of abandoning control, of letting oneself go. mi sono innamorato (I am in ...
1
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2answers
49 views

Can “probability” be used interchangeably with “rate”?

In a document about a barcode reader, I came across an expression "scanning probability" to indicate the percentage of successful reading of barcodes by the barcode reader in question. I would use ...
0
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1answer
46 views

“A teaching assistant in/of/for Applied Quantitative Methods”

I am a Teaching Assistant in/of/for Applied Quantitative Methods Which preposition is correct this context? And why?
3
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4answers
1k views

“To be assigned to” usage question

Many years ago I translated a document and wrote "he was assigned to an operation" (context: hospital operation, the assignee is undergoing one). An English professor who volunteered to copyedit my ...
0
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1answer
440 views

What does “putting your head into my mouth” mean?

The following passage is from the novel Ivanhoe by Walter Scott. "By St Dunstan," answered Gurth, "thou speakest but sad truths; little is left to us but the air we breathe, and that appears to ...
2
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1answer
66 views

“What X is this?” vs. “What's this X?”

What's the difference between "What color is this?" and "What's this color?". If someone is asking a kid, which one is more appropriate? Should he use "Which" instead of "What"?
5
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4answers
27k views

“Elder brother” or “older brother”?

I've read both forms in newspapers and online news: elder brother and older brother. What's the difference between them? When should I use which?
2
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3answers
845 views

“Brunette” vs. “brown” and “blonde” vs. “yellow”

Why is that we never use these terms interchangeably? I.e. one wouldn't say "I've painted my walls a deep brunette". Why is it that "brunette" and "blonde" are used exclusively in reference to hair ...
4
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4answers
398 views

Verb used with “threshold”

I am wondering what verb collocates with threshold. I can think of verbs such as surpass, cross, pass, but I am not sure if they are correct to use here. The threshold I am referring to is not a ...
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1answer
120 views

“The accomplishments we achieve will allow us to grow as individuals.” Is this correct?

I do not think the verb "achieve" collocates with "accomplishment" as it seems redundant. Any alternative verb suggestion would be welcome.
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2answers
123 views

Does one say “subscribe to insurance” or is “enroll” or “buy” a more fitting verb?

This is for use in an apartment lease. The lease is translated from Japanese for reference only for expats living in Japan, and will not be legally binding. "The Second Party shall, for the duration ...
5
votes
1answer
11k views

“No point in” vs. “no point of” vs. “no point to”

Point in, point of, point to. (Point in the sense of "purpose".) What are the differences among these — in meaning? in usage (each is used in certain constructions or with certain ...
14
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5answers
1k views

What does a door do on its hinge?

In general sense of the language we would say that a door "opens" or "closes". But I am looking for a one-word answer (preferably) that would indicate its motion around the hinge. Does it swivel, ...
6
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5answers
3k views

“desert island” versus “deserted island”

What is the difference between "a desert island" and "a deserted island"? Are they synonyms?
2
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5answers
14k views

”Demand in/on/for something”

I am not sure whether to use in, on, or for after the word demand in the following sentence: The continuing demand on high-quality software that is reusable and easy to maintain and modify after ...
4
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2answers
784 views

“Prices of” vs “prices for”

I came across two different sentences, from The Wall Street Journal, both containing the word "prices" but with different prepositions, "of" and "for". Here are the two sentences. Audi Cuts ...
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2answers
2k views

Is there a difference between “depressive” and “depressing”?

Is news depressing or depressive? In what situations would you use these two words? According to dicionary.com: depressive - tending to depress depressing - serving to depress; inducing a ...
0
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2answers
139 views

Can the verb 'judge' collocate with 'of'? [closed]

I saw this sentence in an essay: Children’s cognitive development is on the preoperational stage, so they cannot consider as logical and judge of dangerous events. I would say "judge sth" or ...
2
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2answers
538 views

Do I take a small nap or a light nap?

I heard a friends say that he's going to take a small nap. Is this correct usage? I thought we only take light naps.
2
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3answers
68 views

Word for “quietly accumulating shares of stock by traders when the stock is at a lower price”?

I'm looking for a word or expression that means "the act of quietly accumulating shares of stock by traders when the stock is at a lower price"?
0
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2answers
1k views

“Download from” vs. “download off”

I usually download music off the web. I usually download music from the web. What is the difference in between off and from in these sentences? Which one is more suitable in this ...
5
votes
5answers
1k views

Does a laser “etch” things, or does it “engrave” them?

Which (if any) of these adjectives would you use for describing a surface that has been cut using a laser beam: a laser-etched surface a laser-engraved surface a laser-(something else) surface a ...
3
votes
1answer
80 views

Collocations for “compromise”

Fairly simple one this time: What’s the best collocation with compromise if I want to say that it has been reached and, hopefully, is going to last long? I’m looking for the most natural, the “first ...
0
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2answers
2k views

Is it “restricted to” or “restricted from”? [closed]

I came across this sentence: The power to rule was restricted to ministers, and it was restricted from king. What is the difference between "restricted to" and "restricted from" here?
3
votes
2answers
654 views

“Explain the reason why”

Is it natural to say "he explained the reason why he was late"? I suspect that it doesn't make sense. But I reckon "That is the reason why he's sick" is acceptable with "the reason". Could it be ...
2
votes
1answer
119 views

Using “respectively” with “and” vs. “or”

Is it acceptable usage to use "or" with "respectively", or is it possible only with "and"? Example: If the light changes from red to blue or from blue to red, you must catch or throw the ball, ...
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1answer
98 views

“Putative” vs. “surrogate” [closed]

How similar or different is "putative" to "surrogate"? The term "surrogate father" is common, "putative father" is fairly so, too. But what may be the difference in connotation?
0
votes
2answers
851 views

Do we “resolve a doubt” or “dispel a doubt”?

When writing in a academic setting (think of a letter to your professor), what is the most appropriate way of saying this? I will be grateful if you could resolve this doubt in your paper. I ...
2
votes
5answers
108 views

A word meaning collaborate [closed]

Looking for a short(ish) word approximating "collaborate." The word might also be a clever metaphor or symbol for the idea of collaborating / working as one.
0
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2answers
88 views

Which preposition to use with “forum”

I would hugely appreciate your help thinking through the tagline for a new online forum we are creating. The current version reads: A Forum on Our Economy, National Security and Sustainability. ...
1
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2answers
99 views

Rephrasing “patient with suspected cancer” [closed]

Is it possible to form a sentence like A patient who is suspected for/with/?? cancer and if so, what is the correct preposition after suspect?
0
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1answer
141 views

What do “a bare foot” and “flat on his belly” mean in this context?

In the opening prologue to the novel A Game of Thrones, two sentences left me with questions: The great sentinel was right there ať the top of the ridge, where Will had known it would be, its ...