Collocation refers to the appearance or occurrence of groups or pairs of words, particularly when more frequent than random chance would suggest.

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50 views

Can someone be “chosen voluntarily”? Does it make sense to you?

"The students were chosen voluntarily for the study". I saw this phrase in an article and it made me wonder. The author clearly means that the students voluntarily participated in the study, but has ...
0
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1answer
34 views

achieve a contract vs win a contract

I am wondering if my understanding of these two phrases is correct. Could you confirm this? make a contract = create a contract achieve a contract = win a contract Thank you.
0
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0answers
24 views

I have a doubt v. I'm in doubt [migrated]

I would like to check if my idea is correct. It sounds to me as if the first is when one has a question to be asked, while the second means the person is not sure. Here are two cases: In a ...
0
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2answers
79 views

Does the verb 'to provide' collocate with the word 'feature'?

In a computer science report, is it correct to say the following sentence: A certain package provides multiple features. In other words, does the verb to provide collocate with the word feature? ...
1
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2answers
119 views

Lexical collocation of “former”

Imagine that you are the president of a company, and there was another person playing the same role before you. How should I describe the former president using the expression like "He was the ...
4
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4answers
8k views

Is “with respect to” wrong?

My English professor suggested yesterday that the expression "with respect to", despite being frequently used is simply wrong. He said that one should rather use "in respect of", which in turn is not ...
1
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1answer
461 views

Difference between “in” and “of” when used with the complement 'the department'

I used the following two expressions: in: students in the department of: students of the department What is the difference, if any, between them?
19
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3answers
4k views

Why is it “ladies and gentlemen” instead of “gentlemen and ladies”? [duplicate]

Is there a specific reason for this? After all, it is "boys and girls", rather than "girls and boys". If the boy (male) comes first here, why doesn't it come first in "ladies and gentlemen"?
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3answers
68 views

Should I seek employment 'from' a company or 'at' a company?

I'm having a hard time distinguishing between the two words. I'm unsure of seeking employment "from" or seeking employment "at" a company. The particular sentence I have in mind is this "[some ...
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3answers
34k views

“Gain/acquire/gather/get experience”

According to my Longman dictionary, gain experience and get experience seem to mean the same: gain/get experience: The programme enables pupils to gain some experience of the world of work. But ...
2
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2answers
4k views

Why “knowledge of English” and not “English knowledge”?

Why is the following sentence correct: "A candidate with a good knowledge of English is required for this teaching position." And NOT this sentence: "A candidate with good English knowledge is ...
1
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1answer
62 views

Using “some” to describe units of time

"some minutes, some years, some seconds" are grammatically incorrect. But "a few minutes, a few years, a few seconds" works. I'm trying to teach a non-native speaker this nuance but "it just sounds ...
0
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1answer
21 views

Can I use 'better beauty'? [closed]

By 'better beauty' I mean sth like cruelty free beauty, 'way to a better beauty'. I want to use it in the name for some kind of blog. English is my second language, but I don't know whether it sounds ...
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2answers
2k views

“Have trust in” vs. “have trust for”

What is the appropriate preposition for the following sentence? Is having trust in your employer important to you? Is having trust for your employer important to you?
0
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3answers
365 views

demanded by or demanded for

I doubt about the correct preposition here. Which sentence should I use if it is the engineers themselves who are clamouring for the equipment? This instrument is highly demanded for engineers ...
1
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1answer
25 views

“bear witness for ” VS “bear witness to”?

Is there any difference between "bear witness for Lord Jesus" and "bear witness to Lord Jesus"? These two expressions can be found on the Internet ; they look familiar, but I'm not sure whether they ...
6
votes
2answers
23k views

“Starting with” vs. “starting from”

I would like to ask about the difference between the two phrases starting with and starting from. Take the following two sentences for example: Please give me all the names starting with A. ...
3
votes
3answers
450 views

Meaning of “rendition” in the phrase “rendition camp”

In the movie series XIII the main character was imprisoned in something they called "a rendition camp in Romania". In the movie it looked just like a prison. He was put there on the order of NSA or ...
5
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6answers
28k views

“Excel at something” vs. “excel in something”

I've come across a question while writing an exam Roger really excelled ___ sports A) at B) on C) in D) for My first thought was 'in', later I remembered using 'at' also. I've ...
3
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1answer
58 views

“The lack of consensus impedes the process of necessary enhancements” [closed]

America's infrastructure is crumbling, and a lack of consensus in the government impedes the process of necessary enhancements that should be carried out nationwide. I'm not too sure about the ...
0
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1answer
59 views

“Quest of providing” vs. “quest for providing” [duplicate]

Which sentence is correct and why? In our quest of providing unparalleled value to our customers. In our quest for providing unparalleled value to our customers. I understand that the ...
2
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4answers
84 views

Why do adjectives such as; ‘proud’, ‘aware’, ‘capable’, and ‘afraid’ collocate with the preposition 'OF'? [closed]

The preposition of is used in all the following: be proud of; be aware of; be afraid of; be fond of; be capable of; be jealous of; be envious of, etc. I know it might sound ridiculous, but I have ...
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2answers
40 views

Does “stalemate” collocate with “cause” and “issue”?

Does the following sentence sound right, as far as style is concerned? "His behaviour will cause a stalemate in this issue" Please don`t hesitate and suggest any better-sounding collocations, if you ...
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3answers
90 views

forget or forget about?

Apart from the difference between forget it and forget about it, what do you forget and what do you forget about? Do you forget a face, someone's birthday or your date who is waiting for you? Do ...
4
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4answers
835 views

Construction of to cheat

I am not a native speaker and I would like to write a sentence using the verb "to cheat on". The situation I want to describe is that someone (Mr X) has lied to someone else (Mr Y) convincing Mr Y to ...
6
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4answers
9k views

“desert island” versus “deserted island” [closed]

What is the difference between "a desert island" and "a deserted island"? Are they synonymous?
2
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2answers
2k views

The meaning and use of “no more than”

I'm always confused about the meaning and use of no more than versus no more ____ than. They're sometimes like comparatives, but sometimes also like collocation. How should I distinguish ...
3
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1answer
84 views

To light a cigarette

I've heard "to light a cigarette" being used a couple of times, but I am still in doubt about two things: Is this common both in American English and British English? Are there other ways to say it ...
5
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2answers
77 views

Is 'external' in 'external appearance' redundant when talking about a person's looks?

Recently, I came across an essay titled "should we judge people by their external appearance?" The title made me think whether or not 'external' is redundant in this sentence. Oxford Collocations ...
2
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2answers
17k views

“Nervous” vs. “anxious”

Are these words interchangeable? When would you use one over the other? For example, is it correct to say you "feel nervous" or "feel anxious"? Is it correct to say you are an "anxious person" or a ...
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3answers
98 views

Adjectives that describe the language used in a literary text [closed]

In order to analyse a poem, I often need to comment on the diction used. So far, I've been using words, such as colloquial, everyday,simple. Could you provide some adjectives that describe the ...
0
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1answer
83 views

“Feel bad about someone” versus “feel bad for someone”

Does the sentence "I feel bad about you" have the same meaning as "I feel bad for you"?
3
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3answers
41 views

How to say I have played the main story of a game?

I just played a game from the start to the end of main story, there are many other challenges in the game left untouched, so I think I can't say 'game completed', can I? I know the following possible ...
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1answer
168 views

“Rise in” vs. “rise of”

What’s the difference between "rise in" and "rise of"? Specifically, I am looking at the sentence: The rise __ juvenile crime is attributed to three factors. Which preposition should I choose?
2
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1answer
3k views

prepositions - “increase of” vs “increase in”

Which one is correct or if both are correct, is there any difference? The change is a 10 percent increase of tuition The change is a 10 percent increase in tuition
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2answers
49 views

Is it acceptable to modify “bonus” with “positive”

Before I jump to my question, a short note about cloze tests from Wikipedia A cloze test (also cloze deletion test) is an exercise, test, or assessment consisting of a portion of text with certain ...
2
votes
2answers
43 views

“Guide for” or “guide of” [closed]

I am struggling with the correct preposition going after guide. Which sentence is correct? "that dog served as a guide for blind people" or "that dog served as a guide of blind people".
0
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1answer
65 views

How to congratulate regarding an event [duplicate]

I wanted to simply say congratulations to my friend for his university graduation. But I was kind of stuck for choosing the correct terms. Congratulations on your graduation or Congratulations for ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

In the adjective+preposition collocation, can any other word occur in between them?

I am hungry for breakfast is an example of such collocation while I have lived by the bay area isn't because it has a slightly different grammatical pattern. My question is whether there ...
8
votes
5answers
74k views

What's the difference between “speak” and “talk”, grammatically speaking?

There are a number of questions e.g. What is the difference between “speaking” and “talking”? and “Speak to” vs. “Speak with” that deal with the slightly different connotations of the words "speak" ...
0
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1answer
165 views

What's the difference between 'once' and 'one day'? [closed]

I've just come across these two phrases: "A friend told me one day that he was..." "A friend once told me that he was..." What are the differences between those two phrases in terms of meaning? And ...
4
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3answers
376 views

The train commenced its journey - Is it bad word choice?

Commence means -begin,start. The train commenced its journey... Is the usage of commence flawed? What is the most striking difference between the three forms: Commence,start, and begin?
0
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2answers
155 views

“Satisfied with” vs. “satisfied by” vs. “satisfied in”

He was satisfied with his test result. He was satisfied by his test result. He ws satisfied in his test result. Is there any difference between these?
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Are prior, previous, and preceding interchangeable?

If I have four moments in time (A, B, C, D), where moment D is the present, would previous, preceding, and prior be interchangeable as adjectives to refer to moments A-C? Is one of them more likely to ...
-1
votes
1answer
93 views

“Prefer … to” vs. “prefer … rather than”

Can we use "prefer" and "rather than" together? E.g., I prefer walking rather than driving.
1
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1answer
25 views

Business English: contracted forum?

I would like to know your opinions regarding the use of the term "contracted forum". The context is a long-term project for which steering committee meetings are being conducted. At one time, the ...
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3answers
50 views

A collocation meaning “one has anger”

In the sentence "[...] once anger prevails our consciousness we should immediately distract ourselves to avoid its subsequent effects.", I have directly translated from Turkish, but I was told that ...
0
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0answers
33 views

Difference between Collocational Dictionary and Idiomatic Dictionary and Expressions Dictionary

I am happen to be a hard seeker of different expressions and/or word combinations meanings. so I came across collocation dictionary and idiomatic and expressions dictionaries. is there a difference ...
7
votes
4answers
15k views

“Take a degree” or “do a degree”

In university I learned that we say to do a degree in X but I saw many other sources where it says to take a degree in X. Which is correct? Is there a regional difference?
0
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0answers
23 views

Can I use “this project stretches the ambition of…”

As non-native English user, I am writing an academic research article. I would like to know if we can use "this project stretches the ambition of xxx theory which addresses the issue of..." if no, ...