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1answer
124 views

What is the most common collocation to describe the seven trumpets blown in Revelation?

Revelation 8:1-2 (of the Bible) says the following (KJV): And when he had opened the seventh seal, there was silence in heaven about the space of half an hour. And I saw the seven angels which ...
4
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3answers
10k views

“Elder brother” or “older brother”?

I've read both forms in newspapers and online news: elder brother and older brother. What's the difference between them? When should I use which?
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2answers
135 views

“Confined in the case”, “confined on the bus”

The preposition “to” is widely used in the phrase “be confined to”. My question is, can I use “in” or “on” in the following sentences? Someone is confined in the case. Someone is confined on ...
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4answers
236 views

Preposition for “to be qualified”

Would you please tell me whether the following fragment is grammatically correct? ...led me to be qualified in various science Olympiads. For instance, I ranked 21st among... I know that ...
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2answers
63 views

“Delinquent” to describe something non-monetary

Can delinquent be used to describe something like a school assignment? You still have some delinquent assignments. Or does the word only apply to monetary matters?
0
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1answer
102 views

we take safety measures, do we also 'take' control measures?

Someone provided me with a PowerPoint presentation and instructed me to convert it into a word document with sentences rather than point form notes. Here is what the PowerPoint slide said: "Control ...
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1answer
58 views

“is” or “play” for a role?

i heard someone say "Music is such an important role in my life." I have always thought "role" should be used with "play / have / take", so it goes like "Music has an important role in my life." Is it ...
0
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1answer
42 views

“Arguments to the topic” or “arguments for the topic”?

I'm not sure whether it is possible to say "arguments for the topic" or "arguments to the topic" when I want to express opinions that would relate to the given topic.
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5answers
427 views

Is “almost exactly” correct English?

Is the collocation "almost exactly" grammatical, when one is trying to express that something is almost at the edge of being exact? E.g.: ...and it's almost exactly like...
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1answer
1k views

Is it “query on …” or “query about …”

Which is grammatically correct? Query on Physics Final Query about Physics Final Say if this was a subject field in an email you're about to send to a teacher. Which would be better ...
1
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2answers
3k views

“Nervous” vs. “anxious”

Are these words interchangeable? When would you use one over the other? For example, is it correct to say you "feel nervous" or "feel anxious"? Is it correct to say you are an "anxious person" or a ...
0
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1answer
116 views

“Dedicated”, “intended”, or something else in “tomorrow is dedicated for the registration”

Tomorrow is [dedicated/intended/?] for the registration. The context is the first day at a university. Does either sound okay? If they both sound weird, what verb is a better fit?
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1answer
91 views

“Gained the academic title of professor”

I have a bit of a problem finding the right way to say/write the following: Gained the academic title of professor of xxx. Is the choice of gained fine, or should I use some other verb that is ...
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12answers
1k views

What vivid verb should I use when someone “turns into” a zombie?

In conversation, when someone says they appreciate my brain, I need an effective comeback. I was going to say, "I hope that you are not turning into a zombie with your love for my brain." But I feel ...
4
votes
1answer
448 views

Is “with respect to” wrong?

My English professor suggested yesterday that the expression "with respect to", despite being frequently used is simply wrong. He said that one should rather use "in respect of", which in turn is not ...
0
votes
2answers
205 views

“The distance is great” vs. “high” vs. “large”

I don't want to change the structure of the sentence. So please tell me which adjective works better in this sentence — great, high or large. Due to the resolution of cameras, vehicles are not ...
1
vote
1answer
195 views

What does “putting your head into my mouth” mean?

The following passage is from the novel Ivanhoe by Walter Scott. "By St Dunstan," answered Gurth, "thou speakest but sad truths; little is left to us but the air we breathe, and that appears to ...
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2answers
523 views

“Hold the hope” vs. “keep the hope”

I'm trying to decide whether I should use "hold the hope" or "keep the hope" in a composition I'm preparing. It seems to me they are equivalent. Personally I like "hold the hope" better because sounds ...
3
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2answers
498 views

Where did the expression “achievement unlocked” come from?

Why achievement is unlocked? Achievement is not a lock, door or safe. You don't get anything after unlocking. I have an assumption that it came from gaming history, word "unlocked" just transferred ...
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4answers
160 views

Electrical/electric [duplicate]

Which is correct: Electric power engineering student Electrical power engineering student
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0answers
15 views

“An answer to the question” vs. “an answer for the question” [duplicate]

Which is grammatical: She had no answer to the question. She had no answer for the question.
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2answers
84 views

Usage of “convivial”

Is "convivial" a formal and uncommon word? Can I say "a convivial community"?
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3answers
76 views

“Hospitable transition”

In a resignation letter, would it be right to say: Please let me know how I can assist to make a hospitable transition. Specifically, does the combination "hospitable transition" make sense in ...
1
vote
1answer
103 views

“Come of a royal family” vs. “comes from a royal family”

Is it correct to say "She comes of a royal family"? Or should it be "She comes from a royal family"? Both sound correct to me. Could someone explain?
1
vote
2answers
138 views

A dictionary that systematizes commonly accepted combinations of words

Where can I find a dictionary that contains words along with their commonly accepted "neighbors"? I had one, but it's not for English language. The structure of this dictionary is the following. Take ...
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0answers
1k views

List of collocations in English [closed]

Does anybody know of source (probably NLP study) of comprehensive list of collocations in English (not only the frequent one). Additionally, does anybody know the approximate estimate of the total ...
0
votes
2answers
101 views

What is the difference between “in times of” and “in time of”

All the two phrases, "in time of" and " in times of" are in use on the Internet. But I can not distinguish between them correctly. Here are some examples I have come across: How did Hawkwood ...
2
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3answers
520 views

What is the correct verb for 'driving' a ferry?

The captain of a ferry appears to steer or drive it. What is the correct verb for this?
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3answers
5k views

“Cool water” vs. “cold water”

We often use "cool water". But can we use "cool water" or "cold water"? Which is correct? Examples: I drink cool water only. People always like cool water. In the above examples, ...
1
vote
1answer
270 views

“Function defined on/over the set A”

For the mathematically inclined fellows: If f is a function whose domain is the set A, do you say that f is defined on A or over A? Do both prepositions apply here or is the use of one of them ...
1
vote
2answers
335 views

“Have trust in” vs. “have trust for”

What is the appropriate preposition for the following sentence? Is having trust in your employer important to you? Is having trust for your employer important to you?
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votes
2answers
1k views

“The later part of the 20th century” vs. “the latter part of the 20th century”

For the sentence fragment: "...during the later part of the 20th century" using "latter" sounds better to me: "...during the latter part of the 20th century" But most websites I find have ...
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3answers
423 views

Make/take a photograph?

In English we say "take a photograph" whereas in some other languages one would say "make a photograph". The French say "take" even though they "make" far more often than we do in English, and ...
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votes
1answer
1k views

Proper adjective to use with the word “chance” (“low”, “small”, “slim”, etc.)

What is the proper adjective to use with the word chance? Can chance be low, small, slim? What would be your suggestion?
1
vote
2answers
779 views

Why “knowledge of English” and not “English knowledge”?

Why is the following sentence correct: "A candidate with a good knowledge of English is required for this teaching position." And NOT this sentence: "A candidate with good English knowledge is ...
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2answers
3k views

“Starting with” vs. “starting from”

I would like to ask about the difference between the two phrases starting with and starting from. Take the following two sentences for example: Please give me all the names starting with A. ...
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2answers
2k views

Grammaticality of “a high number of”

Is the phrase "a high number of" considered correct? Or is it only correct to say "a large number of"? Example: Japan has a high number of active volcanoes.
2
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2answers
124 views

Can I bother someone “for” something?

If I want someone (in this case, a Professor) to do something for me that they don't need to do (in this case, a second opinion on another Professor's paper), can I ask whether I can "bother them for ...
2
votes
2answers
7k views

Is it “expert in” or “expert on”?

When would you use "expert in" and when would you use "expert on"? A quick google search yields about the same for both, but I have a feeling "expert in" can occur in sentences somehow with a ...
3
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2answers
8k views

“In the market” or “on the market”

I am trying to help a friend of mine proofreading an English email and she has a preposition there that I am not completely certain is correct. The original sentence was this: [Name of the ...
1
vote
1answer
223 views

Prepositions used with “command line” and “shell”

I found the following variations on the use of "command line" and "shell" in computing and wonder which are correct and how to use them appropriately. Command line: is it "at the command line" or ...
0
votes
2answers
887 views

“Download from” vs. “download off”

I usually download music off the web. I usually download music from the web. What is the difference in between off and from in these sentences? Which one is more suitable in this ...
0
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1answer
83 views

Does “approbate one's flaws” make sense?

I'm going for a little stronger word than accept and I like the word approbate. To approbate my flaws. Does it work?
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1answer
69 views

Using 'show' with 'treatment'

Is it proper to say 'show special treatment' for example in "He showed him special treatment."? I know it sounds more natural to say, "He took a special interest in him because of his background." ...
-1
votes
1answer
134 views

Which is the preposition to go with “best”? Is it “best at”?

Is it right to say: We take pride in doing what we are best at, delivering unsurpassed levels of service, so our customers can do what they are best at.
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votes
2answers
11k views

“Sneak peek on” vs. “sneak peek at”

I would like to post a screenshot of my upcoming app. What is correct to say, "sneak peek on" or "sneak peek at"? Here is a sneak peek on my app for iPhone. Here is a sneak peek at my app for ...
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2answers
78 views

What can we do with a problem? [closed]

We could solve a problem, obviously. Is it possible to use "break", "beat", "hit", "crack" with the meaning of "solve"? I'm trying to find some more emotional equivalent.
0
votes
1answer
173 views

“Quench thirst” vs. “still thirst” when “thirst” is used figuratively

Do I say "quenched my thirst" or "stilled my thirst" when I speak of something that I desire and not actual thirst? E.g. a thirst for a new car or something.
3
votes
1answer
165 views

Can something “hold a property”

In academic writing, it is common to refer to or prove properties about the main object of an article. If I prove a property for (some object), I know I can use the phrase: Property X holds for ...
0
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2answers
93 views

“leverage 'x' with 'y'”?

I read through other questions regarding the use of "leverage" and wonder if you can "leverage one resource with another? For example "Leverage our resources with your own to help you gain market ...