2
votes
1answer
34 views

Using “respectively” with “and” vs. “or”

Is it acceptable usage to use "or" with "respectively", or is it possible only with "and"? Example: If the light changes from red to blue or from blue to red, you must catch or throw the ball, ...
-1
votes
1answer
75 views

“Putative” vs. “surrogate” [closed]

How similar or different is "putative" to "surrogate"? The term "surrogate father" is common, "putative father" is fairly so, too. But what may be the difference in connotation?
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Qualifying a profile

Which of these adjectives is better used to qualify a profile (the width of an elongated object, such as in crossing profile)? low or small large or high Low crossing profile seems more common ...
0
votes
2answers
93 views

Do we “resolve a doubt” or “dispel a doubt”?

When writing in a academic setting (think of a letter to your professor), what is the most appropriate way of saying this? I will be grateful if you could resolve this doubt in your paper. I ...
2
votes
2answers
209 views

Do I take a small nap or a light nap?

I heard a friends say that he's going to take a small nap. Is this correct usage? I thought we only take light naps.
0
votes
3answers
209 views

Is there a difference between “anatomic” and “anatomical”?

I want to say "anatomical context". Google tells me that anatomical in that context is preferred. An online dictionary claimed that American English does not have anatomic but only knows anatomical.
1
vote
1answer
547 views

Which is correct — “email me [on/at] x@y.com”? [duplicate]

Which variant is the correct one: email me on xxx@xxx.com email me at xxx@xxx.com email me to xxx@xxx.com Or should another preposition go there?
2
votes
1answer
493 views

“Take on responsibility” vs. “take up responsibilty”

I now have to take _ additional responsibility. Are both on and up grammatically correct? Is there a difference in meaning? When to use which one?
2
votes
2answers
262 views

What is the difference between the adjectives/adverbs “broad” and “wide”? the nouns “breadth” and “width”? [duplicate]

Broad and wide are near synonyms but only near, since "a broad smile" is a more common collocation than "a wide smile", and you can say "eyes wide open" but not "eyes broad open". Breadth and width ...
2
votes
3answers
310 views

Do you “hit” or “press” a button?

I am currently writing an user manual for a software tool, providing step-by-step usage instructions. I am aware that pressing a button is a perfectly fine expression. However, I'm trying to find ...
0
votes
2answers
774 views

“Following a suggestion” vs. “taking a suggestion”

I am going to be following your suggestion. I am going to be taking your suggestion. Do they mean the same thing? If not, what is the difference between them? If they do mean the same thing, ...
3
votes
4answers
302 views

“Enter a market” vs. “break into a market”

Could you please shed light on the difference, if any, between "enter" vs. "break into" a market? Are they synonyms and interchangeable, or does the latter of the two imply more force?
0
votes
4answers
282 views

Do you shoot a gun or fire a gun? [closed]

He shot a gun. He fired a gun. Do these sentences mean the same thing? I often hear the former, but it has always felt wrong to me (as if another gun were the target). 
2
votes
3answers
2k views

“Excel at something” vs. “excel in something”

I've come across a question while writing an exam Roger really excelled ___ sports A) at B) on C) in D) for My first thought was 'in', later I remembered using 'at' also. I've ...
3
votes
3answers
84 views

“Build a PC”, “assemble a PC”, or something else?

When you have all the parts of a PC and you need to connect them into a working PC, which is the appropriate verb to describe this action: build, assemble or something else?
2
votes
4answers
110 views

What do you do to a gap?

I failed to find a way to reconcile the gap between reality and my ideal. I tried two expressions, 'bring down the gap' and 'overcome the gap', but I realized that the gap cannot be brought ...
5
votes
5answers
322 views

Does a laser “etch” things, or does it “engrave” them?

Which (if any) of these adjectives would you use for describing a surface that has been cut using a laser beam: a laser-etched surface a laser-engraved surface a laser-(something else) surface a ...
3
votes
2answers
721 views

“High aspirations” vs. “large aspirations”

When you intend to say someone has a strong desire to achieve something high or great, is it proper to say they have "high aspirations"? Or would it be "large aspirations", or something else?
0
votes
3answers
93 views

“Seek the truth in X” vs. “seek the truth with X”

Ran into the phrase to seek the truth in love meaning "seek truth without hurting others in the process". I feel it should be "with" rather than "in." No rule in this case?
-1
votes
2answers
83 views

“Intense stress” vs. “high stress”

Capable of performing under intense stress without compromising quality of service. Capable of performing under high stress without compromising quality of service. Which is best suited ...
0
votes
4answers
113 views

does “sluggish” have a negative connotation?

Context: The Processing Speed for situations requiring immediate attention is sluggish I'd like to know if this sounds acceptable in a neuropsychological report, or if there's a more suitable word. ...
0
votes
1answer
79 views

suitable positive alternative to unimpaired (e.g. in neuropsychological function)

I'm translating a neuropsychological assessment report into English and I'm not sure which word/phrase to use here: The neuropsychological functions related to the performance of volitional and ...
4
votes
3answers
10k views

“Elder brother” or “older brother”?

I've read both forms in newspapers and online news: elder brother and older brother. What's the difference between them? When should I use which?
-1
votes
2answers
136 views

“Confined in the case”, “confined on the bus”

The preposition “to” is widely used in the phrase “be confined to”. My question is, can I use “in” or “on” in the following sentences? Someone is confined in the case. Someone is confined on ...
0
votes
1answer
102 views

we take safety measures, do we also 'take' control measures?

Someone provided me with a PowerPoint presentation and instructed me to convert it into a word document with sentences rather than point form notes. Here is what the PowerPoint slide said: "Control ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

“Arguments to the topic” or “arguments for the topic”?

I'm not sure whether it is possible to say "arguments for the topic" or "arguments to the topic" when I want to express opinions that would relate to the given topic.
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Is it “query on …” or “query about …”

Which is grammatically correct? Query on Physics Final Query about Physics Final Say if this was a subject field in an email you're about to send to a teacher. Which would be better ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

“Nervous” vs. “anxious”

Are these words interchangeable? When would you use one over the other? For example, is it correct to say you "feel nervous" or "feel anxious"? Is it correct to say you are an "anxious person" or a ...
0
votes
1answer
119 views

“Dedicated”, “intended”, or something else in “tomorrow is dedicated for the registration”

Tomorrow is [dedicated/intended/?] for the registration. The context is the first day at a university. Does either sound okay? If they both sound weird, what verb is a better fit?
0
votes
1answer
92 views

“Gained the academic title of professor”

I have a bit of a problem finding the right way to say/write the following: Gained the academic title of professor of xxx. Is the choice of gained fine, or should I use some other verb that is ...
0
votes
2answers
205 views

“The distance is great” vs. “high” vs. “large”

I don't want to change the structure of the sentence. So please tell me which adjective works better in this sentence — great, high or large. Due to the resolution of cameras, vehicles are not ...
0
votes
2answers
530 views

“Hold the hope” vs. “keep the hope”

I'm trying to decide whether I should use "hold the hope" or "keep the hope" in a composition I'm preparing. It seems to me they are equivalent. Personally I like "hold the hope" better because sounds ...
0
votes
4answers
160 views

Electrical/electric [duplicate]

Which is correct: Electric power engineering student Electrical power engineering student
0
votes
0answers
15 views

“An answer to the question” vs. “an answer for the question” [duplicate]

Which is grammatical: She had no answer to the question. She had no answer for the question.
1
vote
1answer
104 views

“Come of a royal family” vs. “comes from a royal family”

Is it correct to say "She comes of a royal family"? Or should it be "She comes from a royal family"? Both sound correct to me. Could someone explain?
0
votes
3answers
5k views

“Cool water” vs. “cold water”

We often use "cool water". But can we use "cool water" or "cold water"? Which is correct? Examples: I drink cool water only. People always like cool water. In the above examples, ...
1
vote
1answer
273 views

“Function defined on/over the set A”

For the mathematically inclined fellows: If f is a function whose domain is the set A, do you say that f is defined on A or over A? Do both prepositions apply here or is the use of one of them ...
1
vote
2answers
337 views

“Have trust in” vs. “have trust for”

What is the appropriate preposition for the following sentence? Is having trust in your employer important to you? Is having trust for your employer important to you?
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“The later part of the 20th century” vs. “the latter part of the 20th century”

For the sentence fragment: "...during the later part of the 20th century" using "latter" sounds better to me: "...during the latter part of the 20th century" But most websites I find have ...
11
votes
3answers
429 views

Make/take a photograph?

In English we say "take a photograph" whereas in some other languages one would say "make a photograph". The French say "take" even though they "make" far more often than we do in English, and ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

“Starting with” vs. “starting from”

I would like to ask about the difference between the two phrases starting with and starting from. Take the following two sentences for example: Please give me all the names starting with A. ...
2
votes
2answers
7k views

Is it “expert in” or “expert on”?

When would you use "expert in" and when would you use "expert on"? A quick google search yields about the same for both, but I have a feeling "expert in" can occur in sentences somehow with a ...
3
votes
2answers
8k views

“In the market” or “on the market”

I am trying to help a friend of mine proofreading an English email and she has a preposition there that I am not completely certain is correct. The original sentence was this: [Name of the ...
1
vote
1answer
226 views

Prepositions used with “command line” and “shell”

I found the following variations on the use of "command line" and "shell" in computing and wonder which are correct and how to use them appropriately. Command line: is it "at the command line" or ...
0
votes
2answers
889 views

“Download from” vs. “download off”

I usually download music off the web. I usually download music from the web. What is the difference in between off and from in these sentences? Which one is more suitable in this ...
-1
votes
1answer
69 views

Using 'show' with 'treatment'

Is it proper to say 'show special treatment' for example in "He showed him special treatment."? I know it sounds more natural to say, "He took a special interest in him because of his background." ...
-2
votes
2answers
11k views

“Sneak peek on” vs. “sneak peek at”

I would like to post a screenshot of my upcoming app. What is correct to say, "sneak peek on" or "sneak peek at"? Here is a sneak peek on my app for iPhone. Here is a sneak peek at my app for ...
0
votes
1answer
173 views

“Quench thirst” vs. “still thirst” when “thirst” is used figuratively

Do I say "quenched my thirst" or "stilled my thirst" when I speak of something that I desire and not actual thirst? E.g. a thirst for a new car or something.
1
vote
7answers
316 views

Proper verb to use with “test”

Assume that somebody has created a test/quiz like this one. Has he developed the test? put it together? wrote it? something else? What verb would you use?
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

“Take advantage” vs. “make advantage”

I'm worried that 'take advantage' could have a slightly negative connotation. Could you say "make advantage [of a situation]"?