4
votes
2answers
447 views

“Prices of” vs “prices for”

I came across two different sentences, from The Wall Street Journal, both containing the word "prices" but with different prepositions, "of" and "for". Here are the two sentences. Audi Cuts ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Qualifying a profile

Which of these adjectives is better used to qualify a profile (the width of an elongated object, such as in crossing profile)? low or small large or high Low crossing profile seems more common ...
0
votes
2answers
166 views

Do we “resolve a doubt” or “dispel a doubt”?

When writing in a academic setting (think of a letter to your professor), what is the most appropriate way of saying this? I will be grateful if you could resolve this doubt in your paper. I ...
11
votes
11answers
3k views

“School Students” — what, like there's any other kind of student?

I think this might be a Pennsylvania thing: every so often, you'll see a van or small bus labeled, not "School Bus" or anything sane normal like that, but "School Students". Whenever I see a van ...
2
votes
2answers
247 views

Do I take a small nap or a light nap?

I heard a friends say that he's going to take a small nap. Is this correct usage? I thought we only take light naps.
0
votes
2answers
958 views

“Following a suggestion” vs. “taking a suggestion”

I am going to be following your suggestion. I am going to be taking your suggestion. Do they mean the same thing? If not, what is the difference between them? If they do mean the same thing, ...
-1
votes
2answers
146 views

Can a regret be expressed? [closed]

I know that interest, dissatisfaction, condolence, apologies can all collocate with express, but I am not sure if regret can. I am thinking about the following sentence in particular: I would like ...
0
votes
3answers
93 views

“Seek the truth in X” vs. “seek the truth with X”

Ran into the phrase to seek the truth in love meaning "seek truth without hurting others in the process". I feel it should be "with" rather than "in." No rule in this case?
-1
votes
2answers
87 views

“Intense stress” vs. “high stress”

Capable of performing under intense stress without compromising quality of service. Capable of performing under high stress without compromising quality of service. Which is best suited ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

Is it correct to say “source to” instead of “source of”?

Is it correct use to as preposition in the following sentence? Books are the best source to knowledge. I have mostly seen of as being used with source, for example "source of knowledge". But I ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

“Arguments to the topic” or “arguments for the topic”?

I'm not sure whether it is possible to say "arguments for the topic" or "arguments to the topic" when I want to express opinions that would relate to the given topic.
0
votes
1answer
93 views

“Gained the academic title of professor”

I have a bit of a problem finding the right way to say/write the following: Gained the academic title of professor of xxx. Is the choice of gained fine, or should I use some other verb that is ...
0
votes
3answers
79 views

“Hospitable transition”

In a resignation letter, would it be right to say: Please let me know how I can assist to make a hospitable transition. Specifically, does the combination "hospitable transition" make sense in ...
1
vote
3answers
5k views

“Cool water” vs. “cold water”

We often use "cool water". But can we use "cool water" or "cold water"? Which is correct? Examples: I drink cool water only. People always like cool water. In the above examples, ...
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

Proper adjective to use with the word “chance” (“low”, “small”, “slim”, etc.)

What is the proper adjective to use with the word chance? Can chance be low, small, slim? What would be your suggestion?
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Grammaticality of “a high number of”

Is the phrase "a high number of" considered correct? Or is it only correct to say "a large number of"? Example: Japan has a high number of active volcanoes.
0
votes
1answer
84 views

Does “approbate one's flaws” make sense?

I'm going for a little stronger word than accept and I like the word approbate. To approbate my flaws. Does it work?
-1
votes
1answer
73 views

Using 'show' with 'treatment'

Is it proper to say 'show special treatment' for example in "He showed him special treatment."? I know it sounds more natural to say, "He took a special interest in him because of his background." ...
3
votes
1answer
173 views

Can something “hold a property”

In academic writing, it is common to refer to or prove properties about the main object of an article. If I prove a property for (some object), I know I can use the phrase: Property X holds for ...
2
votes
1answer
62 views

“To consolidate cost”

Is it correct to use the expression "consolidate cost" when you add cost figures in a specific period of time? The context is a description of what a piece of code is doing: consolidate cost over ...
2
votes
5answers
8k views

”Demand in/on/for something”

I am not sure whether to use in, on, or for after the word demand in the following sentence: The continuing demand on high-quality software that is reusable and easy to maintain and modify after ...
3
votes
1answer
76 views

switch genders or gender?

Recently I read an article on Wired.com "Apple Hires Hacker Who Helped Save Windows From Security Hell", http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2012/12/apple-hires-hacker/ Here is a sentence I'm kind ...
3
votes
3answers
8k views

“Gain/acquire/gather/get experience”

According to my Longman dictionary, gain experience and get experience seem to mean the same: gain/get experience: The programme enables pupils to gain some experience of the world of work. But ...
-1
votes
4answers
2k views

“Big budget” vs. “large budget” — which one to use? [closed]

What is the difference between big and large? I am trying to use one of these words but I'm skeptical which one is the right one. The context I intend to use one of these words in is: Small ...
2
votes
1answer
205 views

“Imitation jewelry” or “costume jewelry”

I've looked up the translation of the word bisutería in Spanish and it translated to imitation jewelry or costume jewelry. Which of the two is mostly used in British English?
6
votes
7answers
38k views

Is there a difference between “vice”, “deputy”, “associate”, and “assistant” as descriptive job titles?

When vice, deputy, associate, or assistant is collocated with a job title, such as vice manager, deputy manager, associate manager, assistant manager, I wonder how to rank or differentiate their ...