Questions or inquiries relating to nouns that refer to a group as a whole.

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1answer
23 views

Is the word 'group' singular or plural in sentence: “My group of tenth-graders is/are so well behaved?” [duplicate]

I have read similar questions on this forum and as per best of my knowledge it should be considered plural because it's referring to every student of class. I read this sentence in my grammar book: ...
0
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0answers
36 views

“group have” vs “group has” [duplicate]

Do you say: That group has dogs or That group have dogs I'm not too sure which one is right. I'm just confused because I'm not sure whether the word, group, is plural or not
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7answers
72 views

Collective term for driving, flying and walking systems/hardware?

Not sure if this is the correct place to ask but it is about the English language. I am looking for a collective word that describes the movement hardware for a robot. I am making a game where the ...
0
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1answer
28 views

About the usage of the collective nouns such as media

Is it grammatical to say the following: There are six media widely used: newspapers, radio, TV, books, theater, comics. To be specific, is it correct to place the number six right before ...
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2answers
38 views

Ownership by other people, but not a collective

How do we write the possessive form for "people?" For instance, let's say that I manage money for other people. The people are individuals, here, not a collective (a people). Which is correct, and ...
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5answers
82 views

Is there a word for a group of shapes?

Is there a word for a collection of shapes? For example: one triangle, two squares and three circles.
2
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2answers
42 views

Canadian English and collective nouns subject/verb agreement

Please, forgive me if this has already been asked. I did a quick search and found nothing specifically regarding Canadians, but a kind redirection would be helpful if this is a repeat. I understand ...
1
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1answer
76 views

American versus British collective nouns with plural verbs

"The group are all here." The British seem more inclined to use a plural verb ("are") in sentences like this than Americans are. At some time in the past it struck me that there are some singular ...
4
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3answers
110 views

Collective nouns treated as singular and plural in the same sentence

I have a problem with a sentence in a news announcement I'm writing. This is the sentence: 1) Company X is expanding and hires Person Y as their new CEO. I've previously understood that it is ...
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1answer
50 views

Does orchestra need “the” before it?

Does the sentence It requires full orchestra and progressively adds each of the four brass bands need the between "requires" and "full"?
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2answers
94 views

What is the name of a group of foods that are not cuisine, cooking technique or ingredient specific?

What would the name for a list of foods that are not specific to cuisine, cooking technique or ingredient? This is a question about how to precisely categorize foods using plain English. A curry is ...
3
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3answers
121 views

Is “troop” unique among English words in meaning both a group and an individual member of that kind of group?

The term "troop" can mean a group of soldiers, or it can mean an individual soldier (perhaps in this usage it was originally short for "trooper"). In fact, in modern usage, the plural "troops" almost ...
4
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1answer
57 views

What is the correct possessive form of “One of the guys”? [closed]

Which one should it be? One of the guys' One of the guy's EDIT: Never mind, I think I answered my own question. I realized it would probably be related to the object being possessed. E.g.: "One ...
1
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1answer
62 views

Classification of Band as a Collective Noun [duplicate]

The band of musicians was playing.- here band is a collective noun. The musical band is popular among teenagers.- Can I say band is a collective noun in this context?
2
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3answers
206 views

What is the term for a group of liches?

What is the term for a group of liches? In fantasy fiction, a lich (/ˈlɪtʃ/; cognate to Dutch lijk, German Leiche, Norse lík and Swedish lik all meaning "corpse") is a type of undead creature. ...
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4answers
223 views

What do you call a group (collective noun) of programmers? [closed]

What do you call a group (collective noun) of programmers? I've raise this questions on programmers group but nobody could give me a definitive answer. Probably the ones that make sense are ...
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1answer
117 views

Collective Noun: Is the possessive with “children” singular or plural? [duplicate]

Which is preferred: Children will have their picture displayed. OR Children will have their pictures displayed. The actually photographs of children not drawings
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0answers
30 views

Hoard of bugs was/were squashed? [duplicate]

Is hoard of bugs to be treated as singular or plural? ...and what we mean by that is that a hoard of bugs were squashed relentlessly in this release ...and what we mean by that is that a ...
0
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0answers
10 views

Has and have usage difference [duplicate]

Three teenage boys have now been released on bail, the London Metropolitan Police have stated. Why it is not "Police has stated"?
7
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1answer
981 views

Are “streak” and “ambush” really the collective nouns for tigers?

I am interested in British English collective nouns for tiger. The wikipedia offers "streak" and "ambush". However, when I search google ngrams I get nothing at all for "streak of tigers" or "ambush ...
0
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0answers
287 views

Is there a collective term for restaurants, cafes, bars, pubs and clubs?

I'm looking for a parent category name for restaurants, cafes, bars, pubs and clubs? If the category had included hotels i'd have called it hospitality... but it doesn't.
48
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3answers
3k views

Etymology of “a pride of lions”

Etymonline does not hesitate to assume that "a pride of lions" is the same word as pride, noun of adjective proud. There would be other possibilities, e.g. a connection with Latin praeda (prey). A ...
2
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2answers
1k views

“Sport” vs “Sports” Origin

I was recently reading this article on the use of "math" vs. "maths" as a collective noun (Americans use the former, Brits the latter). However, the trend seen in "math/maths" is reversed in ...
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2answers
156 views

Nouns and pronouns [closed]

When I am writing about the United States and refer to "the states", do I say: "states began using their police powers" or "states began using its police powers"?
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0answers
9 views

Is it “brown bowl set” or “brown bowls set”? [duplicate]

I'm struggling to find a reason for making it "brown bowl set" without the plural? Please note that this is just a product description on an e-commerce site and the phrase won't be used in a full ...
0
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2answers
60 views

Collective word for these people

I am looking for a word to describe people such as barber, ironsmith, tailor, carpenter etc. People with miscellaneous specialty who would move to a village to serve others who are normally into ...
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2answers
135 views

word describing name and birthday collectively

i'm looking for a word that would exclusively denote the person's name and birth data it should be analogous with words such as contacts denoting entities such as email, phone number, address ...
0
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1answer
93 views

Collective noun for words that describe something they themself contain or are

Is there a collective noun for words that describe something that this word itself contains or is? Here are some examples of what I mean: ‘noun’ is a noun itself; ‘háček’ contains a letter with a ...
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3answers
88 views

Collective term for physical as opposed to virtual (digital) destinations

I am looking for a word or phrase that encapsulates the following collection of nouns in the sense that they are all physical, proper entities, and that you can go inside them: Words that apply to ...
1
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1answer
117 views

Is “Were there cattle on the road?” grammatically correct?

Is Were there cattle on the road? grammatically correct? What is the rule regarding the usage of was and were around collective nouns ?
3
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2answers
3k views

Using 'her' vs. 'its' to refer to a country

I am currently reading Liddell Hart's "History of the Second World War", and I'm wondering why he sometimes uses her/she when talking about Japan. In my understanding of English, it should be its or ...
11
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4answers
15k views

What is the collective noun for a group of scorpions?

I was reading Walter O'Brien's AMA on Reddit and came across this: oscarveli: How did you choose your hacker name? O'Brien: It was chosen for me in high school as I was a very docile person ...
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1answer
138 views

American English: collective noun + verb when collective noun is plural? [duplicate]

I'm struggling with grammar and the name of a group of clinics; let's say that there are five dental clinics colocated in the same building, and the name of that group is Foo Dental Clinics. There's a ...
7
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14answers
7k views

What is a group of cars on the road called?

For rental agencies and companies, the cars owned would be a fleet. Several cars escorting a VIP would be a motorcade. However, what if I want to say: I dislike being the lone driver in an empty ...
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5answers
498 views

Word for a group of similar photos?

Is there a single word or phrase that means a group of very similar photos, such as when a photographer takes a burst of 7-8 shots with the hope of catching the right instant, or to get the best ...
3
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1answer
83 views

Can more options use “is”

So I've been learning German on Duolingo (great app by the way if you want to learn a language). I know you guys don't want translations here, but this is more about the English. Of course, not all ...
4
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3answers
705 views

Collective noun for lightning(s) / thunderbolts

What is the collective noun for lightning(s) / thunderbolts? A ________ of thunderbolts/lightning(s) Can we use the plural form of lightning with a collective noun? Or should it stay in ...
1
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3answers
116 views

What word means a “collection of diaries”?

I like to collect diaries but I couldn’t find any word for this hobby nor for what a collection of diaries is called. If anyone knows please share.
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0answers
40 views

Plural/singular form for a company in American English? [duplicate]

Somewhere on the internet a guy claims that in American English it's proper to use the singular form for conjugating the predicate of group terms such as company, band, team etc. In British English, ...
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3answers
456 views

Can I say “stuffs” as a plural noun?

I know that "stuff" is a collective noun, but other collective nouns like "family" can be pluralized, but "stuffs" doesn't sound quite right to me. However, the spell check on my browser says that ...
0
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2answers
61 views

Can collective nouns technically refer to only one noun?

For those who don't know, collective nouns are words like "family" that refer to a group of things. As I understand it, "stuff" is also a collective noun; that is confirmed by this question. ...
2
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1answer
115 views

Can 'trains' be used as a synonym for 'postponement'

Was solving a cryptic crossword clue recently which reads Coaches for postponement (6) The answer is 'trains' obvious from coaches , but dont get the postponement reference. The solution ...
2
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4answers
336 views

Collective term for data sizes (bytes, kilobytes, megabytes etc.)

As you will probably work out from my profile, I'm a software developer. This is sort of a software development question, but I think this is more suited to English language too. Feel free to migrate ...
0
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0answers
3k views

Family go vs family goes? [duplicate]

I am wondering which one is current? -my family go... - my family goes... Which is correct?
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2answers
87 views

“Led Zeppelin was” vs. “Led Zeppelin were” [duplicate]

Led Zeppelin were an English rock band formed in London in 1968. (Source.) Is "were" really the right word here? It feels like it should be "was". After reading the answers and my own ...
1
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1answer
134 views

Question on usage of “clientele”

Between these two sentences, which (if either) is correct in American English: Our clientele range from a small non-profit to a billion dollar corporation... or Our clientele ranges from a ...
18
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4answers
2k views

Surely *some* wordsmiths must love America[ns]?

People who like/admire English or French (the languages and/or the people and their culture) are easily identified as Anglophiles or Francophiles. I'm not sure there are so many Germanophiles, but ...
5
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8answers
664 views

Is there a single word which means “a person, and all of his ancestors”, or “a person, and all of his descendants”?

There are a lot of words describing ancestral relationships between people, such as: parent grandparent great-grandparent any of the above can be described as an "ancestor". child grandchild ...
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2answers
375 views

What is a collective noun for “a set of policies”?

I'm having trouble find a collective noun (or similar word) that describes a "set or collection of [business] policies" for some documentation I'm writing for my domain of work (without going into ...
1
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2answers
127 views

What does an atomizer spray?

What does an atomizer spray? A spritz? A drop? Something else? I'm helping a friend write marketing copy, and we'd like to give the instruction "spray two drops onto your hand", and we would ...