Clauses are smallest grammatical unit that can express a complete proposition

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Clause confusion

I am studying SFL grammar and I have this sentence that I need to break down into clauses and say what type of clauses they are. Studies show that when caught by fishermen, sea trout are more ...
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Clause identification problem

The sentence is as follows: "All we do is just fight." My opinion is the only essential component that a clause should have is a verb. Therefore, an analysis of the sentence above would be that ...
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32 views

Should I use 'which' or 'that' in my sentence?

I can imagine this might be a duplicate, but even looking at the questions asked, I'm still not sure when I should use which or that. I'm uncertain whether or not I should use 'that' or 'which' in my ...
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23 views

Is adding a that clause to these clauses valid?

I am unsure whether I can use that-clauses or zero-that-clauses like this: I noticed (that) when we heard (that) to make noise would be forbidden was surprising. I told him (that) what I saw ...
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34 views

Adverbial clause modification with an infinitive

Given the sentence I am unable to join you while I am on vacation "While I am on vacation" is an adverbial clause supplying the time when this sentence is true. But, does this clause modify the ...
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Can “which” be used as a conjunctive pronoun in the appositive clause? [migrated]

In my second language learning class the teacher kept telling us that the pronoun "which" cannot be used in the appositive clause; I disagree with this. Here's why: The problem which one should ...
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36 views

Should you follow parallelism even if you're only connecting 2 clauses/phrases?

Is the following sentence parallel? "The program commenced with the speaker explaining the definition of recollection, which means reuniting with God and that we need to have faith in Him." If I ...
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Verbs that can be used with “that” clause

Are there restrictions on verbs that can be used with a that clause? (I've been searching for some time and can't find a definite answer, but the first answer in this post and this link to tensed ...
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2answers
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Comma usage and properly identifying clauses in sentence

I cannot figure out whether or not I need a comma between the word "cigarettes" and "according" in the following sentence: More college students are using marijuana daily than smoking cigarettes ...
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It saves you endless agony - Correct?

My sentence reads: It may not save you bucks, but, it surely saves you endless agony. Is this correct? Or, do you suggest any alterations?
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39 views

Adverbial clauses or Gerunds! Which one is this?

In my King James Bible, I have found some words which look like Gerunds but they really are not, or at least they don't make sense when they get turned into nouns. Take a look at these examples: ...
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23 views

agree on that clause?

I wrote this sentence one day. "I agree with the author on that the structure of the poem is unusual." I read it again and found it a little strange. I knew that that-clauses cannot be used after a ...
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Should I use commas to delimit a clause that starts with “related to”

I have the following comment in my programming code: pop and store data related to nested objects from validated_data I wonder, should the related to nested objects clause be surrounded by ...
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1answer
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Comma before where when the clause is at the end of the sentence

Please tell me if I should place a comma before the word where in the two sentences below. I would like to work for you since I’m interested in working in a leading international school with ...
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2answers
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Does this sentence exemplify an adverbial clause?

On the Wikipedia page for 'Dependent clause,' on the subject of 'Dependent words,' there is provided an example which supposedly presents an adverbial clause, viz., "Wherever she goes, she leaves an ...
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3answers
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Nonfinite clauses with infinitives

In the sentence, "He loves to travel," "to travel" is described as a nonfinite clause (source). However, one of the rules regarding clauses is that they must at least contain a subject and a verb. So ...
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“People of different kind” or “People of different kinds”

Which of these clauses are correct? "People of different kind" or "People of different kinds" A sample sentence: This brings up the issue of how well our sample represents people of different ...
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1answer
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Some clause structure about “SOURCE said that CLAUSE”?

Suppose we have the following sentences: John believes that people are good. Steve knows that France is in Europe. Now, in these sentences we have some clause (e.g. People are good, France ...
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Can an independent clause have an implied (or null) subject?

I'm trying to determine whether a clause with an implied subject can be considered independent - specifically in the case of compound sentences. For example: "I was tired, but went to the party ...
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1answer
39 views

Using a comma to seperate these clauses? [closed]

English is my second language. A co-worker who edits my work wrote the following two phrases: This way, workers can install the guardrail for the next level from a lower platform eliminating the ...
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1answer
37 views

Do I need a comma after the “or”s? [closed]

It shall not be published in any document or broadcasted or transmitted in any way.
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1answer
41 views

Proper punctuation when using “as is” to make a comparison

I'm wondering what the proper punctuation is when using "as is" to make a comparison. Example: "Venus and Mars are planets, as is Earth when referring to the whole world." I've noticed in this ...
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3answers
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How to punctuate an example indicated by “say”

I'm wondering how commas should be placed around the word "say" and the following clause in a sentence like this: If you have, say, a bucket, that you would like to fill with water, then ... ...
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adverbials part II… I left the building with him…

Can one say a. I left the kitchen with the water running. b. I went to his house with my brother in jail. c. I went out of the bedroom with her naked. d. I left the building with my brother ...
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5answers
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“With tiredness and underperformance the result” - Two adjacent noun phrases

Does anyone know what sort of grammar rule is applied in this sentence (the bold part)? I've never seen this before: ... something we should all spend roughly one-third of our time doing, but ...
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1answer
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How do you use “as it causes”? [closed]

The researchers concluded that glare slows down reading because people cannot properly view what is on the computer, as it causes them to take more time to try to figure out what they are reading. ...
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1answer
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Non-finite clause complementation of complex transitive verbs

This question has been bothering me for a while. It came up when I was reading Chapter 16 of "A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language." How to explain the grammatical structure of the ...
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Am I using in “which in turn” correctly?

The windows do not block out sun light which in turn causes problems such as glares, eye damage, and skin damage for students.
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126 views

Difference between an adjective clause and a noun clause in apposition to a noun or a pronoun?

What is the difference between an adjective clause and a noun clause in apposition to a noun or a pronoun? I am confused because the examples I found are quite similar. Noun clause in apposition to a ...
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What to call a brief sentence that comes before/after the main clause with only a comma

Here is my passage. I believe I'm doing it right, but I'm not sure why. Does this have a specific name? It doesn't seem like an interjection to me, so I'm not sure why I'm so comfortable using a ...
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2answers
35 views

Identifying parts of a sentence

How do the bolded sections of the sentences below function grammatically? (taken from David McCullough's John Adams) Philadelphia, the provincial capital of Pennsylvania on the western bank of the ...
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5answers
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What meaning “Chip on their shoulder” takes here?

The context is below. Bansal is the famous coaching center to clear Engineering Entrance test. Bansal students had a chip on their shoulder, even though they weren't technically even in a college ...
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1answer
43 views

Non finite clauses

I wonder if you guys can help me? I'm really struggling to identify non-finite clauses as the online definitions (infinitives and -ing forms) don't seem adequate to explain them. For example, in the ...
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4answers
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Clause Question

I was going through a reading and this construction confused the student: “Will we be able to talk?” I asked, my eyes red and swollen from crying, a balled up tissue squeezed tightly between my ...
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42 views

‘the condition that <noun> be <adjective>’

In a scientific paper, I am using a phrase that is something like ‘the condition that all the numbers be positive’. I was wondering what kind of construction this is (the ‘be’) and how it compares to ...
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The use of comma before 'and'

Here's a sentence that's quite confusing to me: You should provide a strategy that is based on the criteria specified in the document,and a formula calculating the return. What are the two parts ...
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3answers
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“… a risk that it exists or will exist” - Sentence Wording

in the following piece of legislation, can you tell me if the correct grammar is being used? "A person acts recklessly within the meaning of section 1 of the Criminal Damage Act 1971 with respect to ...
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1answer
1k views

Must a coordinating clause always have a subject?

E.g., (1) You are getting yourselves into a very dangerous situation; get out of there at once. The imperative following the first clause has an implied subject, so would this mean it is a ...
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2answers
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Can the verb “include” be followed by a clause?

Is this structure correct? We guarantee to everyone high-standard care, which includes, for example, our client centre is open for you even of weekends and technical support is available ...
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How to analyse the sentence: “Crap” is just a way for old people to say “rap”

“Crap” is just a way for old people to say “rap” By means of clause elements, I am thinking: Crap: subject is: copula just: adverbial And then I don't really know... is 'a way for old people ...
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2answers
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If or since, does it make a difference?

In these sentences below, does it makes a difference if I replace if with since? 1)If you are unemployed, why did you leave your last job? 2)If you are innocent, why did you flee? 3)If you are a ...
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1answer
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Is this really just a problem with an adverb clause lacking a subordinating conjunction?

Here is the example sentence “While I knew you were angry,” stammered the fellow, huffing along behind his beleaguered friend, “this was not what I had in mind.” I figure that the "huffing along ...
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1answer
65 views

Help with what MS Word insists is a comma splice

I usually either accept or work around Word's grammar suggestions (I hate having red/blue lines in my documents) but this particular suggestion has me stumped. The sentence is "Striding forward with ...
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2answers
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Specifying notation with introductory clauses

When writing technical papers I often write sentences like: Where m denotes the proper mass of an object and c denotes the speed of light, the object's rest energy is given by E=mc2. However I ...
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Adverbial or complement

I'm currently learning about the adverbial and complement components of a clause. My book says that "CEO" is the complement in this sentence: "The company made him CEO". I took this to mean ...
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5answers
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Is this a noun clause or an adverbial?

I'm interested in the following question: I want to visit where my grandmother was born. To me it seems like a noun clause because I could replace the clause with a noun. For example: I want to ...
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1answer
42 views

Is this comma correctly used? [closed]

I love to dance and sing, to laugh and play. Is this punctuated correctly? They are dependent clauses and all...
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1answer
57 views

Is the structure “This is because… and so…” grammatically correct?

For example, in the sentence: This is because he was smart, and he worked hard, and so he was very rich. Is this structure correct? If not, how can the sentence be corrected?
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Comma usage; introductory clauses [closed]

In order to, successfully fulfil the aim of the Partial Dispute Act, Section 1019bb DCPR stipulates that there is no direct remedy against a decision in subproceedings. Should the comma after In ...
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Clause boundaries

I have a quick question that I hope you can help with. I'm looking at the sentence 'Simon found it extremely difficult to compete with the bigger children even after gaining the uphill advantage.' ...