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7
votes
2answers
10k views

“Fall”, “fell”, “felled”

How is the causative form of fall used in English? In the present tense, often enough, A tree falls in the woods, but a logger falls trees as well. but in the past tense, A tree fell in the ...
3
votes
0answers
117 views

meaning of bare infinitivals

[i] I saw her clean the room. [ii] He helped me do the work. [iii] She made me clean the room.         What makes you think so?         ...
1
vote
0answers
83 views

Diagramming Sentences with Causative Verbs and Predicate Adjectives

So I was recently relearning how to diagram sentences, but I ran across a sentence that had a causative verb and a predicate adjective and I had no idea how to diagram it. This is my best guess, but ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

Causative infinitive “get”

I have the following sentence: I've got a lot of things to get done by this weekend. Is it correct? Is to get done a valid causative form?
0
votes
1answer
84 views

Question about the proscribed use of “have” along with “get” or “be” [duplicate]

I have asked before and been told that along with the usage of have, there shouldn't be any other words like be or get, as the have already conveys the meaning on its own. Example 1: She never had ...
1
vote
2answers
208 views

use of the verb “make” [closed]

The following is part of a blog post in The Huffington Post: In the perfect world we would all be morning people. We would wake up calm, refreshed and ready to tackle the day. But this isn’t a ...
4
votes
2answers
50 views

Why does “enjoy” (almost) not have a causative sense?

Its etymology confirms that the en- is the same prefix as in enshrine, encourage, encircle, etc., which would normally suggest a causative sense. But rather than "to give joy to", the predominant ...
10
votes
2answers
536 views

has scientists excited or has excited scientists?

I saw the following on the Facebook page of Time. Is "has scientists excited" or the perfect version "has excited scientists" correct? What's the difference if both are correct? The recent ...
0
votes
2answers
49 views

“Made look better” vs. “made to look better”

Results are made to look better by... Results are made look better by... Are both correct? Is there another way of phrasing this sentence?
3
votes
1answer
766 views

Usage of infinitives in this sentence

In my academics I learned that we use infinitives (to + verb 1st form). So I was surprised when someone told me this sentence is incorrect. I am not able to figure it out why this sentence is ...
-2
votes
2answers
183 views

permit vs cause causality

On English causality: Does the superset of permissive action always incorporate the possibility of direct causative action? That is if I translate a statement as X permitted Y but X actually caused Y ...
3
votes
10answers
971 views

Is this grammatical construction an imperative for the third person?

Is the construction 'Let + subject + verb' considered as an order/imperative for the third person: Let every man count his days when it is intended to mean 'must'/'is ordered to'?
7
votes
2answers
1k views

Is “want” a causative verb?

I've always held on to the definition that Causative Verbs express how the Noun before the Verb influences the execution of an action. Similarly, the Longman Student Grammar of Spoken and Written ...
14
votes
2answers
401 views

What’s going on with “drink > drench”? Is it like “passage > passenger”?

Edit: I am looking for a particular linguistic term for this process (which here uses terminal palatalization to indicate such) of turning passive verbs like drink into active verbs like drench. I ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Causative verb using have/has

I can understand the causative form (quite less frequently, we simply say causal verb) with make and get but when used with have/has, it sometimes makes me think differently. Of course, I can ...
0
votes
3answers
628 views

What is the difference between remember and remind [closed]

Could someone explain the difference between these two words? Here is an example of using each. Your hair and eyes remind me of your mother. I can remember people's faces, but not their names.